Free The Bedford Reader Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    What are you looking at?

    • 990 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    Jamaica. "Girl." X.J. Kennedy, Dorthy M. Kennedy, Jane E. Aaron. The Bedford Reader. Boston, Ma: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2009. 367-371. Mernissi, Fatema. "Size 6: The Western Women's Harem." X.J. Kennedy, Dorthy M. Kennedy, Jane E. Aaron. The Bedford Reader. Boston, Ma: Bedford/ St. Martin's, 2009. 252-259. Staple, Brent. "Black Men and Public Space." X.J. Kennedy, Dorthy M. Kennedy, Jane E. Aaron. The Bedford Reader. Boston, Ma: Bedford/ St. Martin's, 2009. 208-211.

    • 990 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Mirror or Foil?

    • 1471 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited

    to the creation of a monster, but the monster in essence was still Dr. Jekyll – just a deeply concealed demon that he tried to disguise. The characters, Bedford and Cavor, in H.G Wells’ novel The First Men in the Moon were not that gruesome but they share a commonality with Dr. Jekyll and Hyde; they both are the mirrored form of the other. Bedford and Cavor are Wells’ character creation to represent his critique on society, instead of creating two individual characters he created mirrors, two characters

    • 1471 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Linda. “Everything Isn’t Racial Profiling”. The Bedford Reader Tenth Edition. Ed. Kennedy, Kennedy, and Aaron. Boston, Bedford/St. Martins, 2011. 563-565. Print. Danticat, Edwidge. “Not Your Homeland”. The Bedford Reader Tenth Edition. Ed. Kennedy, Kennedy, and Aaron. Boston, Bedford/St. Martins, 2011. 572-575. Print. Ehrenreich, Barbara. “The Roots of War”. The Bedford Reader Tenth Edition. Ed. Kennedy, Kennedy, Aaron. Boston, Bedford/St. Martins, 2011. 598-601. Print. Khan, Adnan.

    • 1318 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Writing of Alice Munro

    • 1314 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    in her own life. Being a Canadian native, Munro is often compared to great Southern writers such as Faulkner and OíConnor due to her ability to place her characters in confrontation with tradition. Because of her implicit style of writing, many readers can easily relate to the characters, settings, and plots of her stories. Through the use of complex characters, setting, ironic humor, and symbolism, Munro elegantly creates fictional short stories that easily survive in a non-fiction lifestyle.

    • 1314 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Theme Analysis of Killings by Andre Dubus

    • 753 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    suspense is left in the mind of the reader. The title encourages readers to question who and what. It is also an intricate setting for the plot’s mood. It implies that a murder has taken place, but that is all the reader knows. The chronology of the story uses a style called "in media res”, a term used to describe the common strategy of beginning a story in the middle of the action or entering on the verge of some important moment (Meyer 2198). In this story, the readers are shown that murder not only

    • 753 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    English Literacies: A New Perspective

    • 752 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    process; and incorporate conventions for source integration such as paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting. I have a newfound respect and exhilaration for the English discourse. I really enjoyed chapter three: “Literacies: How Have You Become the Reader/Writer You are Today?” The chapter talks about literacy but not just about reading and writing; “[the experts are] more broadly referring to fluency or expertise in communicating and interacting with other people. (Wardle and Downs 328)” In my essay

    • 752 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    In this story, the narrator is a madman who is paranoid of an old man who has a pale blue eye. Through the narration and the actions he makes, the reader can see the true insanity that lives within the narrator. The narrator writes, “The Tell-Tale Heart”, in a personal viewpoint. From this viewpoint, it allows the reader into his mind and the reader can tell he is unstable. He hears things and sees things that

    • 817 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sugar Character Analysis

    • 985 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Prior to Sugar’s first departure from the Bedford house Mary took on a much more distant role in her life, similar to that of the role of the Lacey sisters. Mary may have cared about Sugar, but it was certainly less direct and there was a financial gain to keeping Sugar around. Sugar returns to St. Louis cut up and bloody from a violent client presumably expecting to work for Mary again, however she is greeted by Mercy and becomes aware that the Bedford house is no longer operating as a brothel.

    • 985 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    is, of course, about the whales and marine life. The novel is set during the early to mid 1800s in New Bedford, the largest whaling port at the time. Melville plunges the reader deep into the controversial industry we recognize as whaling by making the novel revolve around one task: getting revenge on Moby Dick, the white whale. Even by just initially setting the stage of Moby – Dick in New Bedford, Melville prepared for commenting on the whaling industry. By pushing limits and by publishing one of

    • 1779 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Origins of Patriarchy

    • 725 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    Comparative Reader. Vol. One: To 1550. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2004. 16-20 Lerner, Gerda. “The Urban Revolution: Origins of Patriarchy”. Worlds of History: A Comparative Reader. Vol. One: To 1550. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2004. 21-28 Shostak, Marjorie. “Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman”. Worlds of History: A Comparative Reader. Vol. One: To 1550. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2004. 10-16. Reilly, Kevin. Worlds of History: A Comparative Reader. Vol. One: To 1550. Boston: Bedford/St.

    • 725 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    of the stories are of an interesting comparison because they both end in the perspective of a murderer. In “Killings” the reader is left with a depressed feeling and an irresolvable ending, while in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” the reader is left feeling like the story was somewhat resolved even after all the gruesome fatality. The endings of these stories leave the reader with opposite feelings and Dubus and O’ Connor show their different outlooks on the world through these endings. “Killings”

    • 1135 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    appearance and reality. One function of Dr. Rank in the play is to foreshadow events to come. Upon Rank's introduction in Act I, the reader is immediately given insight into the conflict Nora will face with Krogstad. Rank provides the reader with minute details into Krogstad's past that will help in understanding his desperate blackmail attempt. The reader can begin to see this in Rank's statement to Nora and Mrs. Linde: "Oh, it's a lawyer, Krogstad, a type you wouldn't know. His character

    • 1741 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    To Sell or Not to Sell

    • 661 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide. 12th ed. Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell. Boston: Bedford, 2012. 614-17. Print. Krauthammer, Charles. “Yes, Let's Pay for Organs.” Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide. 12th ed. Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell. Boston: Bedford, 2012. 620-22. Print. Postrel, Virginia. “The Surgery Was Simple; the Process Is Another Story.” 2006. Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide. 12th ed. Ed. Laurie

    • 661 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Yes but no, I say no because in order to move forward as one we must be able to forgive and forget. In Angelou’s essay she stated “my race groaned. It was our people failing; it was another lynching yet another black man hanging on a tree”. (Bedford Reader pg. 104). The thought of Joe Louis losing the fight would have been truly heartbreaking for the African American community at that time, but not because he was a great boxer but because he was a black man. To think that even to this day we make

    • 1047 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    loneliness radiated from whaling communities, such as the island of Nantucket and New Bedford. The book, Captain Ahab Had a Wife, by Lisa Norling recounts the lives of colonial sea wives, whose crucial contributions to the overall success of the whaling industry has been overlooked by historians. The book mainly concentrates on the whaling widows, who resided on the island of Nantucket and on the mainland of New Bedford, which at the time, were the primary whaling communities in New England. As one of

    • 1839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    conflict in a better way, and help the author develop the plot in an interesting manner In addition, symbolism works as an aesthetic glass through which the reader can perceive the beauty and universal appeal of the story. In every culture, heirlooms are a bonding element among family members. Thus, the symbolic meaning of the quilts allows the reader to connect personally with the story, help him reflect on his own family and, possibly, appreciate how past generations have contributed in his or her life

    • 1355 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Successful by Experience: A Modest Proposal

    • 733 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    to authors of political writing. If the writers had not actually gone through what they reported, ethos would not be equally served. Personal experience is one the most important factors in establishing relationships between the speaker, text, and reader in a political writing. Jonathan Swift published “A Modest Proposal” when years of drought led to a crop failure in Ireland causing thousands to starve to death. This tragedy was blatantly ignored by the English. Swift, being raised in Ireland and

    • 733 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach” invites the reader to determine if they, like the speaker, would isolate themselves to preserve their present ideologies; while Wilfred Owen’s poem “Dulce Et Decorum Est” implores the reader to evaluate what they consider to be worthy of glorification. While the two poems are distinctly different in both time period and setting, Arnold’s poem is better interpreted by the extension of the imagery presented in his last stanza by the war setting in Owen’s “Dulce”. The

    • 566 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Many times readers lose interest in stories that they feel are not authentic. In addition, readers feel that fictitious novels and stories are for children and lack depth. Tim O’ Brien maintains that keeping readers of fiction entertained is a most daunting task, “The problem with unsuccessful stories is usually simple: they are boring, a consequence of the failure of imagination- to vividly imagine and to vividly render extraordinary human events, or sequences of events, is the hard-lifting, heavy-duty

    • 602 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In chapter 12, Douglass explains to the readers and gives the details of his long journey from freedom and how he was successful . However, Douglass explains to the readers he was unable to give a complete account of his flight, because disclosing all the facts of the escape would compromise those who helped him and make it more difficult for other slaves to escape. Frederick Douglass also expresses the frustration he’s feeling with the way in which the In the chapter Douglass explains appreciative

    • 1338 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays