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    The Temperance Movement

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    started during the Temperance Movement, when proponents voluntarily abstained from alcohol. This abstention was due to alcohol’s, perceived, moral downfalls. However, slowly, the various provinces reversed their restrictions on alcohol and moved from prohibition to system of coordination. There were several reasons for this change: lack of enforcement, lack of effectiveness in goal, change in public support or thought, and economic factors. It is important to talk about the Temperance Movement to better

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    The Temperance Movement

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    The Temperance Movement Ask this question: What would happen if alcohol was banned from the U.S.? Well, that’s exactly what the Temperance Movement did. During the late 1800’s up until the 1930’s, the U.S. Government decided on the banning of alcohol for drinking. The reason for the movement is that crime rates we’re increasing, most of which were related to drinking. In order to try and get things lower, all bars were closed as well as all alcohol being burned or dumped. In the present day, one

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    The Great National Temperance Drink Coca-Cola Enterprises is the self-proclaimed largest bottler of "liquid, nonalcoholic refreshment" in the world. More than 350 million people live in Coke territory and since late last century most have been addicted to the sweetened water. Anyone who prefers sipping an ice-cold Coca-Cola Classic (or one of their companion sodas such as Diet Coke, Sprite, Mr. Pibb, Cherry Coke, Mello Yellow, etc.) should start deciding how much they are willing to pay for

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    Aristotle, Temperance, Pleasure, and Pain

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    Aristotle, Temperance, Pleasure, and Pain(1) ABSTRACT: Aristotle argues that temperance is the mean concerned with pleasure and pain (NE 1107b5-9 and 1117b25-27). Most commentators focus on the moderation of pleasures and hardly discuss how this virtue relates to pain. In what follows, I consider the place of pain in Aristotle’s discussion of temperance and resolve contradictory interpretations by turning to the following question: is temperance ever properly painful? In part one, I examine the

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    Theme of Temperance in The Faeirie Queene The themes of temperance, that being the employment of restraint, or at least moderation, especially in the yielding to personal appetites or desires, and of intemperance, the submitting to such desires, pervade Book Two of The Faeirie Queene. Prior to describing individual rooms within the Castle of Alma, it is useful to briefly discuss how the idea of the castle functions within the Book. Spenser compares the towers of the structure with towers at Thebes

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    Learning Temperance in Homer’s Odyssey

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    Learning Temperance in Homer’s Odyssey Being a work of importance in the western tradition of philosophy, The Odyssey is much more than some play written by Homer ages ago. Though The Odyssey certainly is a dramatic work and partially intended for entertainment, it also provides insight into the ways of thinking of the time it has been written in. Aside from illustrating the perspective of early Greek philosophy The Odyssey also raises certain questions pertaining to virtues and the morality

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    Temperance Movement

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    Temperance Movement The Temperance Movement, the movement that was both helped and hurt by racism, the movement that was led by women and shut down 7,000 saloons. It all started when Maine adopted the very first state law that prohibited the sale of alcohol. The Temperance Movement involved a couple of different people. First off, it included France Willard. He became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1874. Then months later she had been promoted to the organization of the National

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    Many may say that the Antebellum Temperance Movement was primarily motivated by religious moralism. I tend to take that stance as well. The Antebellum Temperance Movement of the 18th century was focused around the idea that people, mostly men, should abstain from alcohol if they could not drink the spirits in moderation. In this era, many women had suffered greatly because their loved ones would imbibe excessively leaving them short on money, food, and even shelter which left many impoverished and

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    The desire to control alcohol consumption, or advocate temperance, has been a goal of humanity throughout countless periods of history. Many countries have had organized temperance movements, including Australia, Canada, Britain, Denmark, Poland, and of course, the United States. The American temperance movement was the most widespread reform movement of the 19th century, culminating in laws that completely banned the sale of all alcoholic beverages. The movement progressed from its humble local

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    prohibition on alcohol seemed to achieve more success than the temperance movement of the previous century because the prohibition was a political movement, prohibiting the manufacture, transportation and sale of alcohol. On the other hand the Temperance movement was more of a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. The temperance movement was based on opinions, people’s beliefs and even religion. The temperance movement was a temporary fix because for example, Carrie Nation

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    Alcohol was drunk in excess during the colonial periods, by the 1820’s the per capita annual consumption of alcohol was roughly three times the amount today. The Temperance movement was a social movement with the hopes to promote moderation when it came to drinking alcoholic beverages. The movement began to pick up steam around the 1830’s during these years many people formed unions or clubs to help tackle the problem of intemperance together. Though it seemed that in some circles they just wanted

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    The temperance movement gave birth to a new and quite frightening era. They started something bigger than themselves, and that was the launch of the eighteenth amendment. And in reality, it brought nothing but bad things. For example, the eighteenth amendment kick started bootlegging, gangs, and illegal places people went to go and drink. Because alcohol was never illegal until the nationwide prohibition, and without a doubt, it made quite an impact on our well-grounded country (“Prohibition”, Britannica;

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    to experience a series of societal changes, resulting in a time period which is presently referred to as the “age of reform.” Of the various changes which occurred, the temperance reform was one of the most prominent, with it sparking debate as to what the motivation behind it was. The debate lies in whether the antebellum temperance reform was motivated largely due to religious moralism or not. Those on the yes side of the argument believe that the ban on alcohol was primarily a result of the religious

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    a year – three times as much as we drink today – and alcohol abuse (primarily by men) was wreaking havoc on the lives of many.” In the 1800s millions of Americans took a pledge to refrain from drinking alcohol. This was known as the Temperance Movement. The temperance movement was a reaction to the increase of alcohol consumption throughout the nation. The opposition to drinking originally stemmed from heath and religious reformers. These groups were crucial to American society for their efforts to

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    the Temperance Movement was created to solve this growing problem. Led by a group of Christian women, the movement was created to moderate mens’ drinking habitats thus protecting domestic home life. But by the 1820s the movement started to advocate for the total abstinence of all alcohol; that is to urge people to stop drinking completely. The movement was also influential in passing laws that prohibited the sale of liquor in several states. Prohibition became the next step in the temperance movement

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    Temperance is defined as the abstinence from alcoholic drinks. During the Era of Reform this was a concept that continued to grow. During the early 1800s the production and consumption of alcohol began to rise slowly. Temperance emerged as a backlash against the popularity of drinking. In 1826, The American Temperance Society advocated total abstinence from alcohol. People during this time saw drinking as an immoral and irreligious activity that ultimately led to poverty and mental instability. Many

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    Willard in which it provided detailed report of her experience participating in a temperance movement. Frances Willard’s literary piece uplifts the idea of humane purity against foul and slow working toxins that are capable of corrupting the most innocent kind of men, and stresses the importance for men to not be pressured to follow the crowd. Frances Willard’s “We Sang Rock of Ages” essay indicated the temperance movement’s pursuit to heal social morals, abolish the excessive use of alcohol, and

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    The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and the Creation of a Politicized Female Reform Culture In 1879, a group of evangelical churchwomen, all members of the Illinois Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), presented to their state legislature a massive petition asking that Illinois women be granted the right to vote. The architect of this ambitious petition campaign, which resulted in 180,000 signatures of support, was Frances Willard, then president of the Illinois WCTU. In using her

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    to push through physical or emotional hardship, however that may be true, but that is not is not an excuse to give up everyone has the capability to exhibit perseverance along with restraint. Temperance is a vital trait that allows us to maintain self-control but it can be a grueling task to uphold. Temperance is something that can be utilized in many sorts of situations an area

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    Temperance and Allegory

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    fantastic story of romance, heroism, morality, and glory. In book two, Sir Guyon, the knight of temperance, is led into hell, and tempted by the creature known as Mammon, but remains faithful to his temperate values. In stanzas 44-46 of book two, Spenser utilizes techniques of romance poetry to create an allegory between Mammon’s daughter and the Catholic Church, reflecting Reformation ideals of temperance in the Protestant faith. The Faerie Queene is a work that subtly blends aspects of traditional

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