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    Teaching Techniques in Special Education

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    Teaching Techniques in Special Education In the past two decades many changes have been made in education. Many of these changes have occurred in the special education area. There has been an increase in the number of students who need services in many different areas. Due to the vast array of ability levels and disabilities among students with special needs the teaching techniques and methods used in the classroom must also vary greatly. This is important to effectively facilitate a child’s needs

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    Teaching Techniques for Different Learning Styles As teachers we will be faced with many difficult tasks one of which will be finding creative ways to motivate the children in our classes to learn. There are so many teaching techniques it may be overwhelming for new teachers. With the emphasis on test scores and the “No Child Left Behind” Act many teachers may fear being creative in the classroom. This paper will attempt to explore some creative teaching techniques. Recently there has been

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    student's primary job is to learn. The techniques are what differ among teachers and in turn that shapes the relationship between the two parties. As many of the writers discussed in class, have pointed out, the education experience, from curriculum to academic and extra-curricular programs directs a person's path in life. Is this relationship among teacher and student that important to discuss and analyze? Does a student's education depend on the techniques of the teacher? Alternatively, do students

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    Teaching and teachers have been around for a long time. In the Old Testament, the instruction was provided by the scribes. Even though we don’t have an in-depth description of teaching techniques, we do have an idea that the usual method was rote memory. The teacher’s role was to communicate the message and the hearer was to recite that same message back to the teacher. Teaching then moved to another phase – this next phase was to arouse the listener’s aptitude by presenting problems and to cultivate

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    taught a bedroom full of stuffed animals and filled in imaginary names in our old school books. From the bad bears and loud bunnies to the good puppies and smart kittens, each stuffed animal possessed his or her own personality. The thought of teaching never entered into my mind when I was asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Uncertain about the career field that I desired to pursue, my decisions depended upon the topics that held my interest at the time. Paleontology was the first

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    Standardized Testing After 1965, preparation for mandatory standardized testing began to take over traditional teaching techniques and curriculum plans in the classroom. These tests are designed to measure a student's skill level in relation to other students who take the same test. Schools are being transformed "from centers of learning to centers of test preparation."(Wetzel,Bill) Teaching to the test has caused an uproar between teachers, students, and administrators globally, nationally, state-wide

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    In a sense, knowledge is power. A good aspect of education is it is something that can be achieved and can not be taken away by anyone. As a future teacher, I plan to give my students a well-rounded education. I plan to use different teaching techniques to relay information in a way that will be suiting to each students learning style. One of my goals is to have a developmentally appropriate curriculum where my students can learn on their level. I do not think anyone should be left behind;

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    My Philosophy Statement

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    William James and John Dewey are accredited for developing the characteristically American philosophy that is progressivism. Progressivism relies on the theory that the student should be the focal point. By adjusting the curriculum and teaching techniques to reflect the student’s needs and interests, the teacher is encouraging the student’s desire to learn. Another theory of progressivism is that of a democratic system. Students will fare better in life if they are exposed to the ideas and

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    there are still many great thinkers who are revolutionizing teaching with their philosophies today. In the later part of the twentieth century there was also Paulo Friere who is considered by some to be the greatest thinker of his time and also Maxine Greene who has also greatly changed education in today’s society. Thanks to these great minds along with many others, modern day education was revolutionized. Many of the teaching techniques and ideals that are practiced in the classroom today originated

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    Occupational Therapy

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    might benefit the patient and helps design specific assistive devices. “It is the job of the occupational therapist to innovate plans to overcome the imposed limitations while helping the patient reduce strain and prevent further damage by teaching techniques that conserve energy” (Sasser 75). There are numerous ways to make daily living easier. The most crucial part of therapy is assessing the patient’s environment. All the people, cultural conditions and physical objects that are around them, create

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    is according to a study done by Moore and Kearsley in 1996. Birnbaum quotes, “distance education is defined as planned learning that normally occurs in a different place and requires a well-defined system of delivery that includes modified teaching techniques, alternative modes for communication (i.e. computers), as well as alternative administrative and organizational components.” (Birnbaum, 2001, p. 1)[1] Then, again in 1996, another researcher by the name of Keegan assigned 5 criteria in his

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    Creative Writing in the Composition Classroom

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    piece as they try to argue they side of an in-class debate. Composition classes do not only work on a studentís writing, they also get the students to think through their writing (at least the good ones do). There is a certain well-accepted style to teaching writing in the traditional composition class, and it works very well for many students and teachers. However, should the line of comfort be crossed, and if so, how? Should composition instructors grab a hold of a different writing style, making it

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    Style and its Relationship to Good Writing

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    purpose of educating writers to be better writers. However, their approaches are vastly different, and it’s important to explore each manual to see how, in some cases, they compliment and contradict each other. To better appreciate different teaching techniques and explore which one should be used based on the goals of the writer a study of each of the writing stylebooks is in order. The first impor... ... middle of paper ... ...adability of the text and a concern for the audience that is reading

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    My Philosophy of Education

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    Forming a philosophy of education is not as simple as it might sound. In articulating my teaching philosophy, I assess and examine myself to identify the goals I wish to achieve and accomplish in teaching. It is important to possess a philosophy of education as it guides my instructional decisions and provides stability, continuity, and log-term guidance. I believe that the teaching philosophy represents a clear and distinctive organizing vision of why I am doing what I am doing. Developing a personal

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    Effective Teaching Techniques Taking notes, creating presentations, doing worksheets, group activities, writing essays, and even taking tests are all methods of learning. These methods all do the same thing, but require the student to apply his or her knowledge in a different way. In schools today, there are several different strategies in the teaching and learning method. Every student is unique in their own individual way; Therefore, they each prefer to learn with a strategy that is similar to

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    Teaching Techniques Over Time

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    School. Retrieved December 10, 2013, from Harvey One Room School. www.harveyoneroomschool.com Resource area for teaching. (2013, February). Bridging the engagement gap with hands-on teaching. Retrieved December 10, 2013, from Raft. www.raft.net SMART Technologies. (n.d.). The history of SMART. Retrieved December 10, 2013, from SMART Technologies. www.smarttechnologies.com/history Teaching of Language Arts. (n.d.). Models of Language Arts Instruction, focus on outcomes, language arts standards. Retrieved

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    Learning by Teaching and Increased Exposure in the Classroom The idea of inclusion or mainstreaming has been around the education community for a long time. Both of these ideas involve including students with learning disabilities in regular classrooms to be taught by regular teachers rather than special education teachers. The difference between the two is that inclusion allows for a learning disabled student to be in a classroom for the majority of their day and mainstreaming allows or a learning

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    Benefits of Using Microsoft Excel

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    Benefits of Using Microsoft Excel Since the beginning of the American school system; educators have tried to improve their teaching techniques in order, to be more effective in the classroom. With the recent technological advances we have benefited from in the past couple of decades; the educational system has greatly improved. For the last ten to fifteen years, the school system has successfully phased in the curriculum frequent computer usage in the classrooms, in order to improve the students

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    The Role of Magnocellular Cells in Dyslexia

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    of certain areas of the brain. (What is dyslexia!) Because of this, Dyslexia can not be cured and will never be outgrown. Appropriate teaching methods are taught to help those with dyslexia overcome their weakness by using their strengths. Understanding how this disability works and where it stems from can only help in the search for beneficial teaching techniques. Because there are many different aspects of dyslexia, very few dyslexics show all the signs of the disorder. Understanding some of

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    My Teaching Philosophy

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    My Teaching Philosophy All of my life I have enjoyed helping others. I have also loved the classes I have had with a really good teacher. I think it’s a wonderful feeling to be able to help someone and to know that there is someone there to help me when I need it. I want to help teach the future leaders of this country, as well as those content with just being themselves and staying out of trouble. I honestly believe in Rosseau’s idea that children are born good and that things in society contribute

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