Free Tammany Hall Essays and Papers

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Free Tammany Hall Essays and Papers

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    Plunkitt of Tammany Hall

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    I can that has to be taken for approaches. I sell at my own price later on and drop some more money in the bank. Wouldn’t you? It’s just like lookin’ ahead in Wall Street or in the cof... ... middle of paper ... ...s; Plunkitt and those in Tammany hall made it their business to “know every man, women and child in the district,”(RIORDON, Chapter, 6) because they understood that those were their voting constituents. The reformers came to understand that they needed people like Plunkitt and the

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    power that turned the city around. Under the leadership of William “Boss” Tweed, Tammany Hall, the branch of the Democratic Party in New York, revitalized the city. They funded the building of bridges, hospitals, and parks, and provided financial aid to immigrants, including helping them find jobs and avoid the draft. Despite the negative connotation that comes along with the names William “Boss” Tweed and Tammany Hall, the improvement in the quality of life of New York City in the late 1800s and

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    Plunkitt of Tammany Hall

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    Plunkitt of Tammany Hall 1. Honest Graft and Dishonest Graft- When Plunkitt was tipped off about something in the city or someone wanting to built a park or something, he sees the opportunity and he takes it. He buys up the land before they do. When they see that they are going to need the land, he sells it to them at a much higher price than what he paid for it, giving him a nice profit. That is honest graft. Several politicians are accused of stealing dollars from the state’s treasury, this

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    George Washington Plunkitt of Tammany Hall Everybody is talkin' these days about Tammany men growin' rich on graft, but nobody thinks of drawin' the distinction between honest graft and dishonest graft." With this sentence in the first chapter Plunkitt sets the tone for his short treatise on New York City politics while Tammany Hall ran the show. George Washington Plunkitt was a senator in New York during the turn of the 19th Century to the 20th Century. He was very successful in politics,

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    led the reform committee that brought Tammany to its knees – by the 1960s, the once glorious machine had been destroyed8. The urban political machine was a force that provided stability and growth for the “out-of-control” urban populations. Cities grew at uncontrollable rates and organizations like Tammany Hall instituted public improvements and created millions of jobs for the torrential flow of immigrants into Ellis Island7. It can even be argued that Tammany and other political machines made the

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    George W. Plunkitt of Tammany Hall may have been one of the most arrogant & intelligent men of his time, he saw his opportunities when they arose and he took them as soon as he possibly could. Not only did he make a huge fortune but he made it using, what he called, "honest graft". With this sentence in the first chapter,"Everybody is talkin' these days about Tammany men growin' rich on graft, but nobody thinks of drawin' the distinction between honest graft and dishonest graft." Plunkitt sets the

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    Boss Tweed

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    the community. Political machines were able to restructure the city governments; they also resulted in poorer services, corruption and aggravation of the immigrants and minorities. ("Encyclopedia of American History") He was able to infiltrate Tammany Hall and bribe or smooth-talk any government official that stood in his way. Famously, Tweed is known for the construction of the New York Courthouse. It wasn't until the New York Times wrote an exposé on Boss Tweed that his grafting became publicly

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    and Frank Hague’s had a negative impact on the democratic system. The political machine of New York, known as Tammany Hall, was the largest, and therefore had the greatest impact. Its leader William Tweed, or “Boss Tweed” was one of the most fraudulent leaders. He would often take bribes, illegally set up elections, appoint his friends to the high paying jobs within Tammany Hall, and steal large sums of money from the city. When a newspaper cartoonist tried to expose this in his cartoons

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    what ever

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    Today Tammany Hall is a New York City Landmark not only because of the beauty of this building, but also because of the history of Tammany Hall. The building is now the New York Film Academy building. Although, both of the previously mentioned titles present a positive connotation for Tammany Hall, it does have a dark past in New York history. Tammany Hall was built back in 1929 right at the end of the roaring 20’s; a time period filled with corruption and with wealth. Tammany Hall was constructed

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    The Gilded Age

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    an organization that works to win elections so that the machine can exercise political and civil power. The most notorious political machine was New York City's Tammany Hall, which dominated Party politics in the late 19th century, survived until the 20th, and is most associated with wide spread corruption. "Boss" Tweed of Tammany Hall ran New York in the 1860s and early 1870s and some of his feats of swindling helps explain how the machine system works. It mostly centers around the, then new,

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