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    Prologue and The Canterbury Tales , we can find any number of characters with these behavior distinctions if we examine them. The Knight, for example, is described as a worthy man of "trouthe and honour, freedom and curtesie" (I, 46). He is of a noble rank, and therefore his behavior is one of good reputation (honour). Conversely, Both the descriptions of the Reeve and the Miller in the General Prologue are quite unflattering; their verbal cutting into each other's tales demonstrates the stereotypical

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    At the opening of the Pardoner’s Tale, Chaucer introduces the three main characters and, by his description of them, identifies them as sinners. Also, through emotive lingual and poetic techniques, a mood is set which the rest of the tale can later develop. The Pardoner’s Tale is a sermon against the folly of cupiditas, and the opening serves well to begin that tale. The protagonists themselves, introduced near the outset as "yonge folk that haunteden folye", are clearly established as archetypal

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    Fairy tales help to establish gender roles at a young age to characterize and represent the ideals, values, and roles that each gender should succumb to. They specifically target younger aged audiences; therefore these stories provide children with images in which encompass their roles as either male or female. Females are taught to be kind, sweet, week, honest, self-sacrificing, and beautiful. On the other hand males are taught to be courageous, brave, saviors, and wise. Many of these characteristics

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    her two novels or thirty-two short stories (1).In many of her works, she paradoxically uses styles that are grotesque and brutal to illustrate themes of grace and self-actualization. As O’Connor herself says, “I have found that violence is strangely capable of returning my characters to reality and preparing them to accept their moment of grace” (qtd. in Hawkins 30).Although at times disturbing, O’Connor’s paradox is an effective literary technique, deepening the meaning of her stories.Flannery O’Connor’s

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    action-packed pace, "The Miller's Tale" climaxes with a series of causes and effects and ends rather abruptly with Chaucer's short summary on the sequence of events. On one hand the brusque ending of "The Miller's tale" is appropriate to the nature of The Miller himself, we know him to be a drunk, rude man who, "abide no man for his curtsies," and this ending seems to reflect that behaviour. However on the other hand, as the reader, do we feel "The Miller's Tale," is missing an imperative moral?

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    Secularism v. Spirituality in the Second Nun's Tale In the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer describes the men and women of the Church in extreme forms; most of these holy pilgrims, such as the Monk, the Friar, and Pardoner, are caricatures of objectionable parts of Catholic society.  At a time when the power-hungry Catholic Church used the misery of peasants in order to obtain wealth, it is no wonder that one of the greatest writers of the Middle Ages used his works to comment

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    Canterbury Tales Evaluation The Canterbury Tales is considered one of the greatest works done in the Middle English. Geoffrey Chaucer has all thirty pilgrims tell tales to see who can tell the most moral and entertaining tale. These pilgrims try to tell the best tale to their ability, some do not always follow the script. All of the canterbury tales have different kinds of morals and entertainments that these pilgrims express while on their way to the Canterbury. In The Canterbury Tales chaucer uses

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    cynical novel The Moor's Last Sigh laughs mischievously at the world and shivers from its evils. Weaving a tale of murder and suicide, of atheism and asceticism, of affection and adultery, Rushdie's exquisitely crafted storytelling explains the "fall from grace of a high-born crossbreed," namely our narrator Moraes Zogoiby, also known as "Moor." At the centerpiece of this odd and captivating tale stand the embers of Moor's family: a complex web including a ridiculed political activist, a shrew, a homosexual

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    humans. Her selfishness is on full display throughout the entirety of the story and it ultimately plays a significant role in her untimely death. Her final sense of what’s morally correct in society leaves the reader with an obvious sense of renewed grace which eventually marks the end of the story. In this paper I will discuss how the grandma’s character in “A Good man is Hard to Find” is made to symbolize some of the most obvious imperfections

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    Hard to Find": The Grandmother's Grace Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" tells the metaphorical tale of a family's fatal confrontation with The Misfit, an escaped serial killer. The incidents and characters throughout the story are aspects of a plot intending to symbolize the spiritual grace passed from one human to another, without regard for kindness or evil. The prominent character in O'Connor's story is the grandmother, who embodies this grace. By including imperfections in the

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