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    Reye Syndrome

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    Reye Syndrome Reye Syndrome is an extremely rare, non-contagious disease thought to be triggered by aspirin use. The actual origin of the disease is unknown. Reye's Syndrome, occasionally called Reye-Jacobsen's Syndrome, is known to follow any viral infection. Two of the most common viral infections it precedes is influenza, “the flu”, and chicken pox. A now-familiar warning on bottles of aspirin, most notably Tylenol, is not to give Tylenol to a child who is recovering from the chicken pox, a

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    The Impostor Syndrome

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    The Impostor Syndrome Professor Martine Haas, Organizational Behavior, Cornell University, gave an example of a woman named Vignette who was giving presentations and had to monitor herself in a male dominated setting. She avoided raising her voice at certain times in order not to sound too assertive because she is a woman. Vignette hasn't been the only female or woman who has been faced with this situation. Aside from this type of impression management, there have been many circumstances where

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    Tourette Syndrome

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    Tourette Syndrome People stare at them wherever they go. No one sits next to them on a bus or a train. People sometimes call you rude, offensive, and crazy, and there is nothing you can do to change their minds. This is what life can be like for someone with the disorder Tourette Syndrome. People with Tourette Syndrome are sensitive to repeated "not normal" movements and sounds called tics. Tics are not done on purpose they are difficult and sometimes impossible to control. In mild cases

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    Cinderella Syndrome

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    Cinderella Syndrome I think the time has come for someone to write “Cinderella: The Sequel.” How did we get here? In 1697, French writer Charles Perrault updated an age-old fairy tale about a young woman named Cinderella to appeal to his contemporaries, French nobility and bourgeoisie. So many of the early versions of the tale boasted a very resourceful young woman who played an active role in her destiny. Perrault, however wrote his Cinderella as a well-mannered, docile, selfless women who would

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    Jouubert Syndrome Essay

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    chance of inheriting one abnormal gene. This would make you a carrier. There has always been confusion surrounding exactly what a "Related Disorder” is in relation to Joubert Syndrome. In order to clarify this, the evolution of Joubert syndrome in the medical world needs to be understood. The history of Joubert Syndrome is a complex, rich journey. In 1969 Dr. Marie Joubert came across a family with more than one child showing similar symptoms which included abnormal eye movements, ataxia, and retardation

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    Guillain-Barre Syndrome

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    Guillain-Barre Syndrome Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, is a self-limiting disease characterized by areflexia and acute progressive motor weakness of at least one limb. Other symptoms include motor weakness of the extremities and face, loss or reduction of deep tendon reflexes, decreased sensation throughout the body,ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. In severe cases respiratory failure and autonomic dysfunction may occur. Respiratory failure results from

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    Klinefelter Syndrome

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    KLINEFELTER SYNDROME Klinefelter Syndrome is a syndrome in which a person has an additional X- chromosome. It is not life consuming, but rather people who have this syndrome can live perfectly normal lives proper treatment and care. If precautions are taken early on. Dr. Harry Klinefelter and his co-workers at Massachusetts center hospital in Boston in 1942 first identified the syndrome. These men were of the first to publish a report on this syndrome in its whole, so as to not leave any questions

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    Tourette's Syndrome and the

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    Tourette's Syndrome and the "I" Function Tourette's syndrome is characterized by a presentation of verbal and motor tics. The first descriptions of the syndrome, involving symptoms similar to Tourette's, were reported in the nineteenth century. For most of the twentieth century TS was thought to be a psychiatric disorder because of the ability the patients had to suppress their tics. In the past twenty years more biological factors have been introduced in the study of the syndrome, arising from

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    Down Syndrome

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    genetic or congenital defect or disease. One of the most common of these genetic disorders is Down syndrome. This disorder takes its name from Dr. Langdon Down, who was the first to describe it formally, in 1866. Down syndrome is a condition marked by abnormal physical and mental development that is caused by a genetic defect. This genetic defect is caused by an extra chromosome. People born with Down syndrome have 47 chromosomes compared to the normal amount of 46, 23 chromosomes inherited from each parent

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    Edward's Syndrome

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    Down syndrome (Trisomy21) Untreatable 1 in 700-900 PatauSyndrome (Trisomy13) Very limited life rate 1 in 10,000 Edwards' Syndrome (Trisomy18 Newborns have a 40% chance of surviving to age 1 month. Infants have a 5% chance of surviving to age 1 year. Children have a 1% chance of surviving to age 10 years. [Source: patient.co.uk] (patient.co.uk) 1 in 6,000 Survival, and Recurrence Risk Parental Concerns Parental concerns are mostly essential in Edwards’s syndrome. They

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