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    Surfacing by Margaret Atwood In "Surfacing," by Margaret Atwood, the unnamed protagonist acquires a radical perception of reality that is developed through an intense psychological journey on the island that served as her childhood home. Truth can be taken from the narrator's viewpoint, but the reader must explore the inner turmoil plaguing her in order to understand the basis of such beliefs. The narrator's perception of reality can be deemed reliable once all of these factors are understood;

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    The Feminine Quest in Surfacing and Song of Solomon Margaret Atwood in her novel Surfacing and Toni Morrison in her novel Song of Solomon require their heroines to pass through a stage of self-interpretation as a prerequisite for re-inventing the self.  This stage in the feminine journey manifests a critical act typically absent in the traditional male journey, and one that places Atwood and Morrison's heroines at odds with the patriarchal community.  If authors of feminine journeys meet the

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    Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing – Is the Film More Absurd than the Novel? Surfacing, starring Joseph Bottoms, is not only an astute interpretation of Atwood’s work, but it is also a marvellous film in itself. Yes, marvellous. Certainly, it does justice to Atwood’s portrayal of substanceless women, but if it has any clearly defined themes, they are lost on the audience. What more could an audience want but a film that is incoherent and that is filled with vivid imageries? A woman dancing half-naked

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    Ambiguities of Counter-Hegemonic Monologism in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing In his book Ideologies of Epic, Colin Graham looks at the recognisable tendency of Victorian epic poetry to establish or attempt to establish a monologic discourse in relation to the concept of nation, national literature and empire. Epic as genre and the concept of nation, “ . . . desiring to be ‘centripetal’, turning in upon themselves, denying the existence of the ‘other’” (Graham,1), is a phenomenon relevant to monologic

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    Atwood’s Surfacing, Mary Austin’s Land of Little Rain, and Gary Snyder’s The Practice of the Wild Journeys into the wilderness test far more than the physical boundaries of the human traveler. Twentieth century wilderness authors move beyond the traditional travel-tour approach where nature is an external diversion from everyday life. Instead, nature becomes a catalyst for knowing our internal wilderness and our universal connections to all living things. In Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, Mary Austin’s

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    Surfacing

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    What is the point of writing a story? For most authors, writing a story is their way to convey a certain message to their readers. In the story, Surfacing by Margaret Atwood the author express a multitude of different messages. She uses her story as a way to share her thoughts on things such as the subjugation of women, destruction of nature, and the expansion of America. One of her main focuses, however, is to reveal the truth behind marriage. With the help of symbolism, the author displays

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    Achieving Personal Identity in The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood In the novel, The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood, the principal character Marian McAlpine establishes a well-integrated and balanced personality by rejecting the domination of social conventions, and conquering her own passivity. Through this process to self-awareness, Atwood uses imagery and symbolism to effectively parallel Marian’s journey and caricatures to portray the roles of the ‘consuming’ society. As Marian stands at a

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    Colonization in Literature

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    Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, Atwood explores the effects colonization on Quebec’s cultural and social environment. With the expansion of the English language, French subculture has been slowly pushed back and forced to integrate with an Anglophonic culture. Along with integration of culture, comes the loss of the history and traditions that define a people. Atwood does an immense job of showing the obsession starting to possess society to remember and discover these traditions. Surfacing describes the

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    Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood The adolescent years are often associated with turbulence, illusion, and self-discovery; however, Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim and Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman demonstrate that more often than not, the twenties possess these qualities to a greater extent than adolescence. The age period of the twenties often consists of relationships, employment and self issues and using the premise of these uncertain times, Amis and

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    The novel is Set in 1960’s Toronto and the story revolves around Marian Mcalpin and her engagement in different spheres of her life be it her career, personal and emotional life. The storyline and tale of The Edible Woman revolves around Marian Mcalpin, a woman who has graduated and has started working as an interviewer for a food corporation, and has a good-looking boyfriend named Peter Wollander. Peter has an amiable image as he is physically well built, earns good money as a lawyer, and exhibits

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    The Edible Woman was written in the 1960s, when males dominated society. At this period in time post-war feminist movements were trying to conquer and fight that women could do everything a man could do if only they could get the chance to prove so. In The Edible Woman there are three parts to Marian MacAlpin’s life that play a major role throughout the novel, all the parts have a common denominator, which happens to be food. Part one of the story is about how Marian is trying to identify herself

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    Rereading Atwood's Surfacing The class touched on a multitude of different subjects during the class time for the second discussion of the novel, Surfacing. These discussions were much deeper than the previous one, asking questions on motivation and symbolism rather than plot and language. Two of the most popular subjects were characterization and the validity of the narrator and the information she gives the reader. Other topics were discussed including religion, the bird motif that has

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    The Malignant American in Surfacing

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    The Malignant American in Surfacing Before traveling through Europe last summer, friends advised me to avoid being identified as an American.  Throughout Europe, the term American connotes arrogance and insensitivity to local culture.  In line with the foregoing stereotype, the unnamed narrator's use of the term American in Margaret Atwood's Surfacing is used to describe individuals of any nationality who are unempathetic and thus destructive.  The narrator, however, uses the word in the context

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    Surfacing works at two levels i.e. external which is the worldly pursuit of facts, and the internal, which focuses on the spiritual awareness of the protagonist. The external detective story of the narrator’s search for her father is paralleled by an internal search to discover how she has lost the ability to feel, ands the unraveling of her own mystery is the key to the redemption she seeks. The two mysteries intersect when she recognizes that “it was no longer his death but my own that concerned

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    Margaret Atwood's 'Surfacing' Throughout the book the narrator constantly intertwines the past and present as though it is side by side. Atwood shows this in the opening sentence ‘’I can’t believe I’m on this road again’’. The use of the adjective ‘again’ reveals the narrator has been in this place in an earlier life. The narrator seems to repress a lot of her past and continuously contradicts herself, which at times confuses the reader as we can not tell whether she is talking about her

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    Colonialism in Margaret Atwood's Surfacing

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    Colonialism in Margaret Atwood's 'Surfacing' Margaret Atwood's novel 'Surfacing' demonstrates the complex question of identity for an English-speaking Canadian female. Identity, for the protagonist has become problematic because of her role as a victim of colonial forces. She has been colonized by men in the patriarchal society in which she grew up, by Americans and their cultural imperialism, or neo-colonialism as it has come to be known as, and the Euro-centric legacy that remains in her country

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    A Feminist Perspective of Atwood's Surfacing

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    A Feminist Perspective of Surfacing Often referred to as a "feminist / ecological treatise" by critics, Margaret Atwood's Surfacing reflects the politics and issues of the postmodern society (Hutcheon 145). The narrator of the story (who remains nameless) returns to the undeveloped island that she grew up on to search for her missing father; in the process, she unmasks the dualities and inconsistencies in both her personal life and her patriarchal society. Through the struggle to reclaim her

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    The Black and White World of Atwood's Surfacing Many people elect to view the world and life as a series of paired opposites-love and hate, birth and death, right and wrong. As Anne Lamott said, "it is so much easier to embrace absolutes than to suffer reality" (104). This quote summarizes the thoughts of the narrator in Margaret Atwood's novel Surfacing.  The narrator, whose name is never mentioned, must confront a past that she has tried desperately to ignore (7). She sees herself and the

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    The Psychological Journey of the Narrator in Atwood’s Surfacing In Surfacing, a novel by Margaret Atwood, the narrator undertakes three basic journeys: a physical quest to search for her lost father, a biographical journey into her past, and most importantly a psychological journey. The psychological journey allows the narrator to reconcile her past and ultimately leads to the conclusion of the physical journey. In this psychological voyage into her innerself, the narrator, while travelling

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    The Painful and Lonely Journey in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing Not all journeys are delightful undertakings. In Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, the nameless narrator underwent a painful process of shedding the false skins she had acquired in the city, in order to obtain a psychic cleansing towards an authentic self. By recognizing the superficial qualities of her friends, uncovering the meaning of love, and rediscovering her childhood, the narrator was prepared for change. She was ready to take

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