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    Louis Sullivan

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    Louis Sullivan Louis Sullivan was without a doubt one of the most influential figures in American architecture. He can be credited with lying the foundation of today’s modern skyscrapers. In addition, he has produced some of the most magnificent ornaments seen in 19th and 20th century, which adorned his buildings. On September 3, 1856, Louis Henri Sullivan was born in Boston, Massachusetts. His came from an Irish father and a French mother. Louis led a sheltered childhood as result of the

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    Sullivan vs. Bennett

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    Sullivan vs. Bennett The two texts examined within, present the opposing extremes of views regarding gay and lesbian marriage. The first text entitled Let Gays Marry by Andrew Sullivan examines the intricacies of same sex relationships and why homosexual couples should be allowed to publicly show affection for one another. The second text that will be examined is titled Leave Marriage Alone written by William Bennett. Bennett gives his views on why couples of same sex nature should not be allowed

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    Anne Sullivan Macy

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    Teacher Anne Sullivan Macy By: Helen Keller Year of Publication: 1955 Anne Sullivan Macy Anne Sullivan Macy was born on April 4, 1866 in Feeding Hills, Massachusetts. Her parents were poor Irish immigrants. Anne had trouble with her eyes her whole life. When Anne was eight years old her mother died and two years later her father left. Anne’s younger sister went to live with relatives and Anne and her younger brother Jimmie were sent to the State Infirmary, the almshouse at Tewksbury. They

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    Reviewing Sullivan?s Study of America?s Wine

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    dictionaries and encyclopedias have unknowingly been misleading consumers on the history of “America’s wine,” Zinfandel. In Zinfandel, A History of a Grape and Its Wine, Charles Sullivan, an accomplished viticulture researcher, challenges the popular belief that the grape was originally brought to America by a Hungarian immigrant. Sullivan explores the history of wine to bring forth intriguing facts that prove the popular belief to be wrong. With the help of University of California’s (UC’s) Carole Meredith

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    Louis H Sullivan

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    Louis Henry Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) was an american architect largely active during the industrial revolution. He is often considered the father of skyscrapers and the father of modernism. His art style was largely influenced by the industrial revolution and by Michelangelo’s belief in the spirit of creation. He coined the term “form ever follows function” which became the term form follows function. It is the belief that the form of a building must follow the original

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    Abstract: This essay is focused on how the Chicago fire and the ideas of Louis Sullivan were critical in the development of a new form of architecture in the United States and the societal and social influences that brought it all together. Predating the frequently cited Frank Lloyd Wright and Daniel Burnham, a commonly overlooked name would be that of Louis Sullivan, who is responsible for pioneering an American form of architecture that broke free from

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    Anne Sullivan: A Woman of Strong Conscience When I think of powerful women from the past, Anne Sullivan is one of the first women to pop into my mind. Anne Sullivan was born on April 14, 1866 in Massachusetts. Her real name is Joanna, but she was called Anne throughout her life. When Anne was still young she suffered from a serious illness that left her nearly blind. Anne’s mother died when Anne was only eight and her father left Anne and her two siblings two years later. The children were

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    Anne Sullivan is known as the ‘miracle worker’, mainly because she was one. With her faith in God she enabled blind and deaf Helen Keller to communicate with others and read braille. Sounds impossible, right? Johanna Mansfield Sullivan, known as Anne or Annie all her life, was born on April 14th, 1866 in Feeding Hills, Massachusetts. Annie’s “family” lived there until she was ten. Her mother and father, Thomas and Alice Sullivan, were Irish immigrants, poor and ill. Annie was ill herself. She had

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    According to Andrew Sullivan in the Love Bloat: Why Obsess Over Romance?, there is not such thing called romantic love as we idealized, and his opinion about romantic love is right; there is not such thing called romantic love. In the Love Bloat: Why Obsess Over Romance?, Sullivan says that the concept of romantic love is crock by any serious person before the 19th century. And Sullivan applies Shakespeare’s idea of love—it comes; it goes. If taken too seriously, it kills. Sullivan also gives some his

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    Anne Sullivan: A Great Teacher “A teacher effects eternity'; (Henry B. Adams). A teacher does many things that affect her students. Even though at the time, the student does not understand the wisdom of the teachings. Anne Sullivan is one of those remarkable teachers. Helen Keller became deaf and blind at the age of eighteen months because of a fever. She lived many years not able to communicate with anyone. Helen was allowed, by her family, to do anything she wanted because they did not think

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