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    Sufism

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    Sufism Sufism, otherwise known as Islamic Mysticism, is a branch of Islam. It deals with special powers that are contained in the Qur'an. It is a more philosophical approach, where a person tries to become one with nature, and feel the power of God. The term mysticism can be defined as the consciousness of the One Reality -- be it called Wisdom, Light, Love or Nothing. (Shcimmel 23) A Sufi tries to unite his will with God's will. They try to isolate themselves, so they can fear and become close

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    Sufism Essay

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    The juncture of Islamic and American cultural movements has found a home in the various Sufi traditions that prevalent in the Western world. These subsequent artistic cultural traditions and rituals make Sufism the most culturally dominant and pervasive form of Islam in modern day Western culture – beating out the two largest internationally prevailing sects of orthodox Islam (Sunnism) and Shia’ism. In the following paper, I will assert that there are two primary spheres of Sufi tradition that transcend

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    Sufism Essay

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    Tasawwuff or Sufism is the esoteric and the inward dimension of Islam. It is the mystical aspect of Islam and contrary to popular belief Sufism emerged from the heart of the Islamic revelation. In September 622, Prophet Muhammad migrated from Mecca to Medina in an effort to organize the community and to enable it to fight religious wars against their religious opponents. He considered his own pursuit of faqr—resignation to God’s will and a life of poverty a source of personal pride. It was at the

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    Sufism In India

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    Sufism is also known as Islamic mysticism. It deals with special powers that are mentioned in the Quran. It is a more philosophical approach, where a person tries to become one with nature and feel the power of God. A person who belongs to Sufism is called a Sufi. The word Sufi comes from the Arabic word ‘Suf’ which means wool. Sufism believed that the Quran and Hadith have secret meanings of mysticism. The word mysticism can be defined as the consciousness of the one reality, also called wisdom

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    Sufism Research Paper

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    “Sufism is piety and abstinence…Sufism is being humble and anonymous… Sufism is asking justice from yourself but not from others.” Sufism is a facet of Islam devoted to self-improvement and a lifestyle that fosters a closer relationship to God. Through asceticism, obedience, and zikr, all learned from an older and wiser master, Sufis believe they can reach a higher level of a religious experience than with just the more orthodox methods of Islamic practice. A defining feature of Sufism is the involvement

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    The Islamic Faith Sufism

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    an unconquerable schism between them. The gap, however, is somewhat bridged by a twist on the Islamic faith known as Sufism. The mystic ways of the Sufi society make it very appealing to both Sunnis and Shiites, not to mention the newcomers to the Islamic faith. Sufism uses the quality of unification and the quality of appeal to make it one of the strongest aspects of Islam. Sufism was founded on the belief that Muslims could obtain a 'one-on-one'; relationship with God through mystical practices

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    “The knowledge of God cannot be obtained by seeking, but only those who seek it find it.”(Abu Yazid al-Bistami). This quote sums up the aim of Sufism which is that those who embark on a journey that consists of love and the remembrance of God and living a spiritual and devotional life will attain great reward. Islamic mysticism, otherwise known as Sufism or 'Tasawwuf' is the Islamic science of spirituality that aims to explore and search the 'truth of divine love and knowledge through direct personal

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    Introduction Sufism is often described as being the mystical branch of Islam – a spiritual path that speaks to the very heart of the believer and brings to the fore, a very real sense of God’s immediacy within the context of daily life and religious practice. As a mystical tradition, it propositions a God that has shared His divine essence with mankind – a God who is available to address and dwell within the human condition. By discussing Sufi practice and its development of traditional Islamic precepts

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    II. The Relationship Between Islam and Sufism Though plenty of Muslim scholars have spoken out in favor of Sufism, the prevailing opinion among both Islamic legal scholars and Muslims as that Sufism is bid’ah, (an inauthentic innovation) that is not wholly Islamic, and therefore rejected as an acceptable way to practice Islam. Sufism has always been an ‘alternative’ discourse in the Islamic world “existing in tension with stricter, legalistic elements in the tradition, and there continue to be voices

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    Divinity of Jesus

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    failed to satisfy their deepest spiritual longings and desires. The search for deeper meaning began with a pietistic asceticism, which in turn led to the development of the popular mystical side of Islam - known as tasawwuf or Sufism. The controversial nature of the subject of Sufism becomes evident when one realizes that this short introduction already reveals a viewpoint which the Sufi would strongly disagree with. For, if the Sufi spiritual quest is to be viewed as legitimate, even within Islam itself

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