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    ‘Sub-Roman’ Britain?

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    term ‘sub-Roman’ Britain is traditionally the name that refers to the period of British history that loosely charts from the end of Imperial Roman rule in AD 410 to the arrival of Saint Augustine and his Christian missionaries in AD 597. However, the date for the definitive end of the period is arbitrary as sub-Roman culture continued to develop in the country that would subsequently be known as Wales and similarly in the west of England in areas such as Cornwall and Cumbria. The term ‘sub-Roman’ has

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    anything turned up to connect the place specifically with King Arthur" (51). This serves to... ... middle of paper ... ...s an Vortigern, probably the same one who exists in Geoffrey of Monmouth's account of Britain. According to Alcock, Vortigern "ruled with a group of consiliarii like a Roman -- or for that matter, a Visigothic -- provincial governor" (357). If there was a Vortigern, it is possible to imagine that there may be a chance that Arthur was a king --- after all, he was related to Vortigern

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    The Legendary Camelot

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    The Legendary Camelot This king lay at Camelot one Christmastide With many mighty lords, manly liegemen, Members rightly reckoned of the Round Table, In splendid celebration, seemly and carefree (Stone 22). This is the only time that Camelot, home of the Arthurian legends, is mentioned in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The fourteenth-century poem seemingly gives no clue as to the location of the castle of King Arthur (Alcock 15). According to the Encyclopedia Brittannica, the "real"

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    the evil. Arthur was created during a tough time for the British people, which suggests that Arthur was a beacon of hope that people could use as inspiration to fight through the struggles and continue living their lives. In Concerning the Ruin of Britain, Gildas never mentions Arthur at any point, contradicting the same narrative that is told in the Annals of Cambriae about the Battle of Badon, which suggests that the two documents are unreliable sources. According to the Annals of Cambriae, in 516

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    sixth and seventh centuries AD, when the Welsh and English kingdoms which were to replace Roman government were only beginning (Hero and Legend, 1). Chroniclers tell us that the fifth century in Britain was a morbid time of slaughter and death. The Britons then were the Celtic people, the modern ancestors of the Welsh. They were on the island for a thousand years, and had formed a major part of the Roman Empire and their educated classes of clergy and aristocracy spoke Latin as well as an early

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    The Real Merlin

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    From the shores of Avalon to the court of King Arthur, tales and accounts of the mystical Merlin abound. Did Merlin really exist, and if so, was he the dark magical wizard of legend or an image conjured up by superstitious townsfolk to explain occurrences they didn't understand? To answer this question, one should first look at the actual accomplishments of the figure Merlin. When was the character introduced and what did he do afterwards? What kinds of feats did this person accomplish to make him

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    The Revolt of Boudicca

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    Boudicca was the Queen of the Iceni tribe and was married to the King of the Iceni, Prasutagus. The Iceni were a tribe of Britons and their territory was in the east of England. No one really knew what Boudicca looked like but Cassius Dio, a Roman historian, said that 'She was huge and frightening to look at with a mass of ginger hair that hung to her knees. Her voice was as harsh as her looks she dressed in a multi-coloured tunic with a thick cloak fastened by a brooch flung over it, and

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    Roman Villas

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    Roman Villas Villas were built across the south of Britain during the occupation of the Romans. These were typically used as farms and also housing estates but others were not. In a villa, typically, you would find mosaic floors, hypocausts, a bath suite, a garden, fountains, fortifications, stone walls, glass windows, courtyards, corridors, a kitchen, farm buildings, painted walls and evidence

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    acknowledgement by the peasantry of the British Church’s political power. The Church’s involvement in politics, though making it more central in a person’s life, also left it more vulnerable to corruption and subsequent criticism. The Church in Britain was a medieval “cradle to grave” institution. People were born Christian, received Baptism shortly after, married under a Christian auspices, and were given their Christian last rites shortly before they died. This type of existence is talked of

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    Informal Romanisation

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    Informal Romanisation Strabo was a Roman historian from the time of 30AD. He described Britain as "weak" and said that the Romans "could have taken and conquered Britain any time". The Romans felt that it "was not worth the price" to invade & conquer Britain. Through the trade links with Gaul and Rome, it "practically made the whole island Roman property". Through trade and influence, Britain gained a large part of the Roman way of life from Roman artefacts. Modern day excavations have

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    Rebellion of Queen Boudica Prasutagus, client king of the Iceni after the Roman invasion of Britain, realised that his province was in danger when he died, so he decided to write up a will, in which he said that the Emperor Nero would receive half, while the other half went to his two daughters (Under British law, if the king had no male heir, he could leave his estate to his daughters, but not in Roman law). The Iceni tribe was ransacked, with even the highest men being treated as slaves

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    This was later to be known as “The Battle of Britain.” As well as the domination over this area, each of the powers would intend to take advantage of being the leader in technical warfare (in this case aeroplanes). The main reason why this battle started and the bombing of English cities, in my opinion, is that Germany was trying to knock Britain out of the war; this was to try to avoid an unmanageable war on two fronts, Russia and Britain. I believe that Hitler was also trying to demonstrate

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    Boudica

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    Twenty years after the invasion, Britain was feeling oppressed by the Roman Empire, none more so than the Iceni tribe. Their late king, Prasutagus, had left the Icenian land to the Romans in his will, but on certain conditions. Upon his death, the Romans took over without abiding by any of these conditions, treating the land as if it was theirs by right of conquest. There was looting and tyranny, the king’s family was abused and the Romans savagely ruled over the Iceni. Another factor in aggravating

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    Boudicca was and still is in the eyes of many a national hero. Boudicca is an extremely important part of English and Roman history as she led the only revolt that actually threatened the Roman rule in Britain. Boudicca’s attitude was a true reflection of the way all Celtic people felt about the Roman rule. It is because of this that she was able to unit many Celts on a common cause, during a time of a great cultural and national change. Yet, like all humans Boudicca had her flaws, and though rare

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    customs. My great-grandmother was a McKenzie, so I knew I had a connection within my ... ... middle of paper ... ... its eventual contraction. The Romans tried once more to conquer the lands, and made it as far as the Firth of Clyde, where they built the Antonine Wall. However, it was overrun and soon abandoned in 160 CE. After the Roman withdrawal, four tribes gained dominance in Scotland. In the east were the Picts, who held sway over the land from the river Forth and Shetland. They were

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    Trinovantes. The essay begins with the Trinovantes first interaction with Rome and concludes at the height of the tribe’s power, under the ruler Cunobelin. Research has been conducted through an investigation of important historical figures in southeastern Britain during the aforementioned time period and their relation to the Trinovantes. This research has been done primarily, through the consultation of scholarly sources. Additionally, an archaeologically based analysis of coinage has been conducted to provide

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    powerful state in the region. A tribe known as the Catuvellauni, based out of Hertfordshire, appears to be the most powerful state in the southeastern Britain at the time of Caesar’s conquest. This is likely because their king Cassivellaunus killed the Trinovantian king, Imanuentius, in battle. If the Trinovantes were a strong power in southeastern Britain, as described by Caesar, it would likely take an even more powerful state to defeat them in battle. Additionally, the Catuvellauni were known to be

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    Boudicca Analysis

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    Boudicca is a not talked about so much in history. She was a female leader from the first century of the British Iceni tribe that lead an uprising against the Roman forces that were occupying that area at the time. Her defining moment was when she led the Iceni tribe in battle against the Romans in the Battle of Watling Street. Most of Boudicca’s early life is mostly a mystery. She was born in to a royal family apparently, around the year 25 AD. When she was young, she was married to Prasutagus,

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    utilization of the Roman Salute, and the notion of a “thumbs down” signifying death for a Roman gladiator. In The Eagle, the text at the beginning states that Hadrian’s

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    government looks upon and determines how much money will be awarded. Basically, it's award is only need-based. The rest of the money owed can either be paid off or borrowed from the school or banks in the form of interest-cumulating loans. Now in Britain, the government provides all of tuition costs and gives out grants and loans for living expenses. Students used to just need enough money for personal expenses, but the government doesn't provide living expenses anymore so money needs to be secured

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