Free Stroop Effect Essays and Papers

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    Essay On Stroop Effect

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    For examining the influence of age and gender on the Stroop effect, the experimenter adopted the Stroop paradigm. In Stroop paradigm there are three: neutral or control, congruent and incongruent groups. Neutral / control group will receive stimuli in which only the text or colors are presented (van Maanen L, van Rijn H& Borst JP, 2009). When the color of the word and the text of the word refer to the same color (for example the word "red" printed in red) is a congruent stimulus. In Incongruent

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    Essay On Stroop Effect

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    of interference has been widely studied using the Stroop paradigm. The Stroop effect was first described about 70 years ago (Stroop, 1935). But it was intensively studied in cognitive neuroscience as a viable research tool for investigation of perceptual and cognitive abilities (Dyer & Severance, 1973; Jensen & Rohwer, 1966; MacLeod, 1991). In spite of many modifications throughout the years, the basic principle remains the same. In classical Stroop task, the participants name the colours of the inks

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    stopwatch. On the back of each card, the correct color was written to allow for swift and accurate scoring. In order to record the results, each individual participant also needed a sheet of paper and a pencil or ballpoint pen. Procedure The famous Stroop Task, a within subjects design, was replicated on Tuesday, April 12, 2011 in classroom 303 within Harris Hall on the Marshall University campus in Huntington, West Virginia. Due to a failure in communication, the two groups followed slightly different

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    behavior. This allows researchers to test the behind-the-scenes properties of automatized behaviors by noting their influence on more easily measured behaviors. This demonstration explores a well-known example of this type of influence, the Stroop effect. Stroop (1935) noted that observers were slower to properly identify the color of ink when the ink was used to produce color names different from the ink. That is, observers were slower to identify red ink when it spelled the word blue. This is

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    The Stroop Effect

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    The Stroop effect is demonstrated by the reaction time to determine a color when the color is printed in a different color’s name. Participants respond slower or make more errors when the meaning of the word is incongruent with the color of the word. Despite knowing the meaning of the word, participants showed incapability of ignoring the stimulus attribute. This reflects a clear instance of semantic interference and an unfathomed failure of selective attention (Stroop, 1935). In the study of the

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    The Stroop Effect

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    Discussion This conceptual, numerical replication of the Stroop Effect provides more evidence for the idea that tasks in which incongruence was present will have a greater completion time than tasks in which incongruence was not present due to the levels of processing within each task. Results from this study demonstrate that the reading condition (numbers, no interference) had the lowest completion time while the incongruent counting condition (interference/incongruence) had the greatest completion

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    STROOP EFFECT

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    STROOP 2 The Stroop Effect Thirty years after John Ridley Stroop’s famous experiment in 1935, researchers became fascinated by its effect. Thanks to Klein in 1964, who found that interference of naming was much stronger for closely related words, Stroop’s study finally gained interest from researchers. There has been well over a half century of similar studies, with

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    The Stroop Effect

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    The Stroop Effect is widely known for its accomplishment and psychological relevance. The first experiment was conducted by James McKeen Cattel and Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt. They set out to explain and find why it take longer processing time when naming an object and/or color (Stroop, J. R., 1992). Being able to understand this cognitive process of Reaction Time (RT) allowed experimenters to devised procedures to further prove the concept. There are many reasons why RT and cognitive function interference

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    The Stroop Effect Experiment

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    The Stroop experiment can be traced back as far as the nineteen century around the time of some particular works of Cattell and Wundt. The experiment was first written about in 1929 in German. The experiment was name after John Ridley Stroop after he had written the article “Studies of interference in serial verbal reactions,” which was published in 1935.there have been over 700 replications of this experiment The experiment is a demonstration of reaction time of a task . The Stroop experiment

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    Stroop Effect Experiment

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    The study of the Stroop effect and the difference in reaction times Name: Zhi Xuan Tan Student No: 9445625 Subject: PY102 Foundation Psychology 1b Unit Coordinator: Patrick Johnston Due Date: 22/09/2015 Word Count: Abstract The purpose of this experiment was to examine the widely used paradigm, the Stroop effect, and the difference in reaction time between three conditions. 357 university students were involved. A repeated measures design was used for three conditions: congruent

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    maturation, reading progresses from a controlled process to one that is automatic, lessening the demands on attentional resources. Stroop reported one of the first studies, which provided support for this, in 1935. He combined the word object/property dimensions in the same stimulus to create one of the most researched phenomena in cognitive psychology: The Stroop effect (MacLeod, 1991). He found that it was faster to read words than it was to name the corresponding object or their properties, including

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    Stroop Effect: Anxiety vs. Relaxation

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    have selective attentional bias, also known as schema congruency. The second study that was conducted by Eschenbeck at al. (2004) is based on the theory about processing bias. According to the result of the experiment, high anxious children have more Stroop interference and higher error rates during the threatening stimuli compared to other groups in the experiment. The final study that has a strong connection with my study compared to other studies, it was conducted by Gilboa-Schechtman at al. (2000)

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    an error until after it has occurred. Errors can occur by factors that can cause interference of cognitive processes. The ability to distinguish color is an example of controlled process that is a part of the Stroop Effect. The Stroop Effect was an experiment developed by John Ridley Stroop to demonstrate that interference in cognitive processes can be created. He did this by applying mismatched colors to words for colors (i.e. the word green was written in red) and having people name the color,

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    Abstract An experiment was conducted to test the effect of lateralization and congruency on reaction time to name colors. This was done using a computer program provided by The University of Mississippi. This effect is called the stroop effect. Results showed that it was neither lateralization nor congruency had a significant effect on reaction time, but the interaction of these two variables that created a significant change in the time needed to recognize colors. It is believed that this is

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    The Stroop Effect Comparing Color Word Labels and Color Patch Labels Abstract The current study examined four components of the Stroop effect using a manual word response and a manual color response. The major focus being the three semantic components – semantic relatedness, semantic relevance and response set membership, that contributes to the Stroop interference. The results indicated that there was a response set membership effect in both the manual word response and manual color

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    to read a word that they look at. The situation shows that people encounter with selective attention. Stroop effect is a phenomenon when the semantic meaning of the word matches with the colour it will be easier to say the colour of the word in which it is attributed to the interference from the word in the chore of responding to the colour (Zurron, Goicoa & Diaz, 2013). However, the classic stroop test had only focused on the participants’ selective attention; the ability of the participants to identify

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    Stroop Effect

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    The Stroop effect was first introduced by J. Ridley Stroop in 1935. J. Stroop introduced this phenomena, the Stroop effect, in order to use this as a tool to study cognitive control. Cognitive control is how we humans go through a psychological process in which we plan, coordinate and execute actions in an attempt to complete the given goals. Cognitive control is affected by the attention processes; attention processes is the concept that is responsible in determining the selective task-relevant

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    The Stroop Effect

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    what you’d choose to perceive, you are required to concentrate using your attention. For roughly 75 years the Stroop Effect, named after John Ridley Stroop, has served as an excellent way to test attention, specifically selective attention (Goldstein, 2017). Selective attention is the ability to focus on one stimulus while ignoring other surrounding stimuli. The phenomenon that the Stroop effect causes is an interference of the response mechanisms, resulting in selective attention confliction because

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    The Stroop Effect

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    In Stroop task, When the name of a color (e.g., "blue", "green", or "red") is printed in a color not denoted by the name (e.g., the word "red" printed in blue ink instead of red ink), naming the color of the word takes longer and is more prone to errors than when the color of the ink matches the name of the color. The effect is named after John Ridley Stroop, who first published the effect in English in 1935. My experiment is similar to this famous

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    Effect of Glucose Levels on the Brain

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    social-cognition procedures that intuitively seem to require executive processing, but that do not have a direct, controlled comparison between executive and nonexecutive-demanding conditions. Therefore, it is not clear whether glucose has its primary effects on ex... ... middle of paper ... ...gulation, and Word Imagery Value on Human Memory. Behavioral Neuroscience, 113, 431-438. Scholey, A.B., Sunram-Lea, S.I., Greer, J., Elliot, J., & Kennedy, D.O. (2009). Glucose administration prior to a divided

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