Free Stroke Patients Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stroke Patients

    • 1079 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Stroke is expected to become an increasing burden in Ghana over the next decade. The current stroke epidemic is a cause for serious concern as there is a need for urgent prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease not only in Ghana but also across Sub Saharan Africa. Never the less much of the global health focus tends to be on communicable diseases. A review of the literature suggests that stroke units are the way forward for improving stroke mortality and functional outcomes for stroke

    • 1079 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    in the emergency department in Minot, ND and we often care for ischemic stroke patients. Determining when the stroke symptoms began is one of the most important and most challenging questions to answer. Some patients wake up with stroke symptoms, some have a witnessed incident, and some are found after an unknown amount of time. Depending on the timetable, and whether or not patients meet criteria determines whether the patient will be treated with intravenous tPA or mechanical removal of the clot

    • 1978 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    When assessing the relative literature as well as the plight of stroke patients, one finds that there are many causes or reasons why people fall victim to strokes. Accidents, diet, and old age-related factors are most often identified. Similarly, there exists some consensus as to appropriate treatment or therapy, which of course is dependent upon the individual and actual condition. The risk of stroke in all Americans increases after the age of 45. More often that not, clinicians are predisposed

    • 2470 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Educating a stroke patient comes with many challenges. Patients who have had a stroke may suffer from barriers that may negatively affect the learning process. When educating patients in general, it has been reported that 40-80% of the information provided by the healthcare professionals is forgotten (Kessels, 2003). The more information that is presented, the least amount of information is recalled (Kessels, 2003). Many studies have provided information regarding which teaching modality works

    • 1359 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Emergency departments of hospitals are fundamental in the treatment of time sensitive conditions such as acute stroke (Trzeciak & Rivers, 2003). A stroke occurs when there is an interruption of blood flow to brain tissue, and therefore is a condition that relies on apt and adequate access to healthcare (Panagos, 2006). Patients who have experienced a stroke will most often present to emergency departments in order to receive treatment (Kothari et al, 1998). However it has been found by Chan et al

    • 1024 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    Patient safety is a major issue in health care, especially in the public sector. Studies show that as many as 10 patients get harmed daily as they receive care in stroke rehabilitation wards in hospitals in the United States alone. Patient safety refers to mechanisms for preventing patients from getting harmed as they receive health care services in hospitals. The issue of patient safety is usually associated with factors such as medication errors, wrong-site surgery, health care-acquired infections

    • 2900 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 33 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Introduction Cerebrovascular disease or the term stroke is used to describe the effects of an interruption of the blood supply to a localised area of the brain. It is characterized by rapid focal or global impairment of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours or leading to death (Hatano, 1976). As such it is a clinically defined syndrome and should not be regarded as a single disease. Stroke affects 174-216 people per 10,000 population in the UK per year and accounts for 11% of all deaths in

    • 8017 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Physical Therapy

    • 865 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Physical Therapy “Where am I? How did I get here?” is what many stroke patients say after recovering from an acute or severe stroke. A stroke is also known as a cerebrovascular accident, a life-threatening event where the brain is deprived of adequate oxygen. A physical therapist’s duty is to provide assistance and education that will help patients rehabilitate and return to a normal routine. As of today, there is a new treatment called treadmill training with partial body weight support that

    • 865 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    first or recurrent stroke. Studies show that 10% of strokes are secondary to intracerebral hemorrhage and another 3% are due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. The frequency of stroke varies with age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. African Americans and Hispanics have the greatest threat of intracerebral hemorrhage and excess risk is mostly observed in young and middle aged people (Liebskind & O 'Connor,2015). Pathophysiology Both intercerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic stroke are terms that can

    • 1307 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    also important to be aware of the derivation that our bodies may encounter, for example a stroke. In this passage I discuss different types of strokes, what are the signs and symptoms and after care for this disorder of the cardiovascular system. Strokes occur when there is an insufficient

    • 808 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    associated with infectious diseases like tuberculosis, and non communicable diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke.[1, 6, 8–11] Studies in other settings have described higher burden of vitamin D deficiency among acute stroke patients than non- stroke individuals in the same environment.[11, 12] Suboptimal vitamin D has been associated with many modifiable stroke risk factors, including physical inactivity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes mellitus.[8–10, 13–15] Furthermore

    • 2321 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Bio Feedback Recovery

    • 864 Words
    • 2 Pages

    lower limb among stroke patients. Introduction. A stroke has become one of the most serious diseases which threatens public health worldwide. A prevalence of a stroke increases with age but it is not natural part of aging process. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2013), more than 375,000 Australians had suffered by stroke in 2009 and 70% of them were more than aged 65. Furthermore, more than a third of Australians among them had a disability from the stroke (Australian Institute

    • 864 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Circular Accident Essay

    • 1323 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Accident (CVA) is also known as a stroke. The word “stroke” comes from a Greek word meaning “Apoplexy”, which means to be struck down violently, like by lighting or a thunder bolt. Cerebral Vascular Accident is the sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen. When the blood flow to the brain is impaired by a blockage or a rupture of an artery to the brain, the brain cells die, the part of the body controlled by the cells cannot function. When strokes occur there can be severe loses in

    • 1323 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stroke Leads To Aphasia

    • 845 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    believe you’re speaking words of eloquence and consistency. Patients with aphasia often experience these effects as results of a stroke. Aphasia is a disorder in the ability to communicate, use, and comprehend language. Each year, approximately 80,000 individuals suffer from stroke -based aphasia. However, what if there were treatments or perhaps a way to reduce the chance of someone acquiring this disorder? Many doctors have looked into strokes leading to aphasia and the results remain mixed and entirely

    • 845 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Nursing Paralysis Essay

    • 1111 Words
    • 3 Pages

    that suffered from a stroke? A stroke is where the person suffers from a loss of blood to the brain cells or suffers a blockage in the blood vessels to the brain. This loss of blood to the brain results in the loss of brain function. People that suffer from a stroke usually have paralysis on one side of the body. The paralysis will affect the opposite side of the body comparative to the proportion of the brain which suffered the blood loss. The paralysis effects how the patient can ambulate and function

    • 1111 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    treatment of acute ischemic stroke Introduction Each year ischemic strokes account for 87% of all strokes in the United States being the leading cause of disability (American Heart Association [AHA], 2013). Preventable disabilities related to strokes not only decrease the quality of life, but also cause a significant financial impact on a community. Early treatment of acute ischemic strokes with thrombolytic therapy or mechanical interventions helps to improve patient outcomes and decrease disability

    • 1472 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Post Stroke Effect

    • 543 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Strokes have been one of the leading causes of disabilities in humans (Lau & Chitussi & Elliot & Giannone & McMahon & Sibley & Tee & Matthews & Salbach, 2016). Stroke is the damage to the brain when the blood supply is interrupted resulting in a clotting (Gupta, 2014). Strokes have an abundance of effects, but there are several types of treatments and rehabilitation that are now available and helping to reduce the post stroke deaths (Gregory & Galloway, 2017; Gupta, 2014). Physical effects and

    • 543 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Improving Motor Learning in Post stroke Patients Stroke, the main cause of death worldwide, is a brain attack defined as sudden death of brain cells due to rupture of artery causing loss of speech, weakness, or paralysis of one side of the body (Lindsberg, & Roine, 2004) The current trend in rehabilitation for patients with stroke is a process of ‘relearning’. Chan, Chan, & Au (2006) have pointed out that 93% of patients have difficulty in walking independently once they are discharged from the

    • 954 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Stroke Essay

    • 912 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Stroke has been implicated as the third leading cause of death1. It’s occurrence increases with age, with two-thirds of stroke victims being over 65 years old2. The elderly population is increasing, with 20% of the U.S. population expected to be over 65 years old by the year 20303. As future dentists, these are the people we will one day be treating in our practices. Therefore, it is important for us to be able to properly prevent, recognize, and manage the diseases of the elderly population. Even

    • 912 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dysphagia Screening Many patients who suffer from a stroke will exhibit some form of dysphagia or difficulty swallowing. Within the acute care hospital setting it is the responsibility of nurses to ensure screening for swallowing occurs before anything including water is given orally (NPO). Within the current state of medicine there is no screening tool based on best practices and evidence endorsed by a accrediting entity. This leaves hospitals and nurse research leaders to determine amongst the

    • 709 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Good Essays