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    In Dr. Strangelove, Stanley Kubrick took a serious issue and turned it into a political comedy. He was able to illustrate a satire of the hazardous notion of a nuclear war and the insane individuals who were coordinating it, and furthermore, addressed the issue of stereotyping. This movie was created in 1964; today in 2005, we still have nuclear weapons. Yes, the United States and other countries still have nuclear weapons, however, a question does arise, do we still have insane individuals coordinating

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    Tales of a Strange Love in Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove , filmmaker Stanley Kubrick's nuclear war satire, portrays America's leaders as fumbling idiots and forces American viewers to question the ability of their government. Dr. Strangelove's  cast explores the quirks and dysfunctional personality traits that a layperson would find far-fetched in a person of power.  The characters are diverse yet unified in their unfailing stupidity and naivete.  The film's hysterical dialogue sheds a

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    Review of Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) Stanley Kubrick is infamous for his witty films that satire governmental and societal actions though history. In this film, Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), Kubrick is once again directing a film that is a biting, sardonic comedy that pokes fun at the nuclear fears of the 1950s. The screenplay for the movie was written by Stanley Kubrick and Terry Southern, and was

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    The Cold War Fears of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove Stanley Kubrick's 1963 political satire, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, is a stinging commentary of the Cold War paranoia of the time. Kubrick addresses a myriad of themes throughout the picture, offering an even darker side to an already bleak situation. The movie is also layered with many levels of subtle motifs that require multiple viewings to fully realize. The director also uses several techniques

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    Stanley Kubrick’s sexual parody, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, illustrates an unfathomed nuclear catastrophe. Released in the midst of the Cold War, this 1964 film satirizes the heightened tensions between America and Russia. Many sexual insinuations are implemented to ridicule the serious issue of a global nuclear holocaust, in an effort to countervail the terror that plagued America at that time. Organizing principles, such as Kubrick’s blunt political attitudes

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    Satire and Black Humor in Dr. Strangelove

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    Even though Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb screened in the midst of the sobering Cold War, critics were keen on praising the film for its mastery of humor applied to such a sensitive matter. The film is exceedingly loaded with metaphors, innuendos, and allusions that nothing can be left undissected or taken for face value; the resulting effect is understood to be part of Kubrick’s multifarious theme. Kubrick has stated that what began as a

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    Dr. Strangelove is in itself one of the most interesting pieces of cinema in the history of the medium. It captures a moment in world history, and the fear and hysteria that was associated with it, and translates it into the darkest of comedies. Kubrick came of age after World War II and the beginning of the Cold War, and like many others during this time period, he suffered immense anxiety about the potential for nuclear war, fearing that his hometown of New York could be a likely target, and even

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    “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” “Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” is a movie that portrays the situation during the Cold War in comical fashion. The movie is about the United State’s attempt to recall the planes ordered by the paranoid General Ripper to attack the Soviet Union and essentially save the planet from destruction. Producer and director Stanley Kubrick, basing the movie on the novel Red Alert intended the movie

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    Impact of the Film, Dr. Strangelove, on American Attitudes Towards the Atomic Bomb and Cold War "The truth is bad enough--but nowhere near as bad as you probably think. The truth will do away with a lot of silly ideas, a lot of completely wrong notions, which millions of people now believe about the atomic bomb. These ideas could easily cause great panic. And right now the possibility of panic is one of the best weapons any enemy could use against us." (Gerstell, How to Survive an Atomic Bomb

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    It’s the End of the Worldand I Feel Fine It’s the End of the World…and I Feel Fine! (The role of intellectuals in the creation and justification of nuclear weapons.) In Fail Safe and Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Sidney Lumet and Stanley Kubrick question the relationship between technology and humanity by emphasizing mankind’s tendency to create machines that cannot be adequately controlled. By blatantly revealing the absurdity of game theory (Mutual

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