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    Paternalism in Bram Stoker's Dracula

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    female sex and a continuous exaltation of the domineering male sex.  Stoker communicates this idea through an abundant use of prominent male characters, the presence of merely two women, who are each extremely suppressed, either sexually or intellectually, and the constant exaltation of the male sex over the female sex. In a paternalistic society, men are acclaimed as the foundation and the pillar of the social order.  Stoker illustrates this facet of paternalism through the use of affluent

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    p.m.” Abraham Stoker in this unassuming way begins his Gothic masterpiece, Dracula (The Annotated Dracula 1). Dracula has been called ‘imaginative’ and ‘original.’ , and Harry Ludlam calls it “the product of his own vivid imagination and imaginative research” (Senf 41). However, the originality of Stoker's Dracula is in doubt. By a similarity in the setting, characters and plot, in Bram Stoker’s Gothic work Dracula and the posthumously published short story “Dracula’s Guest,” Stoker is shown to have

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    Gender in Bram Stoker's Dracula

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    Pamela J. Annas and Robert C. Rosen. Upper Saddle River New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 2000. Hughes, William. Beyond Dracula: Bram Stoker?s Fiction and its Cultural Context. New York: Palgrave. 2002. Murfin, Ross C. ?Gender Criticism: What is Gender Criticism?? Case Studies in Contemporary Crticism. Ed. Ed. John Paul Riqulme. New York: Palgrave. 2002. Stoker, Bram. ?Dracula?. Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism. Ed. John Paul Riqulme. New York: Palgrave. 2002.

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    Foreshadowing, Mood, Mythical Parallels, and Narrative Elements in Dracula In the novel Dracula, by Bram Stoker, there is much evidence of foreshadowing and parallels to other myths.  Dracula was not the first story featuring a vampire myth, nor was it the last.  Some would even argue that it was not the best.  However, it was the most original, using foreshadowing and mood to create horrific imagery, mythical parallels to draw upon a source of superstition, and original narrative elements that

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    Money - The True Force Behind Dracula In Dracula (1897), Bram Stoker explores the "wonderful power of money" (Stoker 341). Through the actions of Van Helsing and the "Army of Light" Stoker ponders "What can it not do when it is properly applied; and what it might do when basely used!" (341) through Dracula's machinations. Though one does not usually associate a vampire with a bank statement, Dracula utilizes the power of money as well as his abilities to turn into dust and bats. By granting

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    Bram Stokers “Dracula” an oral presentation Good Morning/Afternoon Today I will review Bram stokers’ 1897 novel Dracula, the approaches I will be using to reviewing the novel include the world centred approach, and the reader response approach exploring the themes of reader positioning and the authors intented reading and reader, then focusing on the world centred approach of the feministtheory. reader centred -attention on the reader -different readers from different social, cultural, religious

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    could ruin young girls, and both fears are embodied by Lord Strongmore. Works Cited Auerbach, Nina. Our Vampires, Ourselves. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1995. LeFanu, Joseph Sheridan. Best Ghost Stories. New York: Dover, 1964. Stoker, Bram. Dracula. 1897. New York: Penguin, 1993.

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    Bram Stoker's Dracula is Anti-Christian There are many ways that Bram Stoker's Dracula can be considered Anti- Christian by showing of Anti-Christian values and perversions of the Christian religion. In chapter one as Jonathan Harker is traveling to Castle Dracula he is met by several people. When he meets these people and tells them where he is going they cross themselves along with doing several other superstiscious actions. One of the women he meets gives him a crucifix to protect him

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    observes that "because of our instinct for self-preservation, we all have a natural fear of losing ourselves in another person" (340). This is evident in Dracula when Lucy knows that her "bad dreams" (Stoker 109) come at night so she has "the pain of sleeplessness, or the pain of the fear of sleep" (Stoker 132). She has the fear that if she sleeps Dracula will appear and cause her to "lose herself." Stoker's Dracula character defies Horney's above statement, presumably because he is not "human." He has

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    Arata, Stephen D. "The Occidental Tourist: Dracula and the Anxiety of Reverse Colonization." Victorian Studies 33.4 (Sum. 1990) : 621-45. Stevenson, John Allen. "A Vampire in the Mirror: The Sexuality of Dracula." PMLA 103 (1988) : 139-49. Stoker, Bram. Dracula. 1897. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1992. Wasson, Richard. "The Politics of Dracula." English Literature in Transition 9 (1966) : 24-27. Zanger, Jules. "A Sympathetic Vibration: Dracula and the Jews." English Literature in Transition 34

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