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    State of Nature – Paper Four In his famous book, Leviathan, English scholar Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) describes to readers the “state of nature”, a depiction where mankind exists in an uncivilized, lawless society where fear of eminent death reign. In his words the state of nature represents a “war of all against all, in which the life of man is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short” (Shafer-Landau 197). In order to escape such a life man must band together into a commonwealth where they trade

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    State Of Nature Essay

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    in a state of nature. Just like all philosophical questions, this too was, and still is, a very complex and difficult matter to discuss. The following paper will be discussing different descriptions of the state of nature and natural law. The philosophers that will be discussed are Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau. The main discussion will concern the similarities and differences between the descriptions of these philosophers' state of nature. As we finish with the state of nature

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    questions regarding the state of nature and human nature. In theory, the state of nature is a state where civil authority is essentially non-existent. Philosophers theorize about this state by examining human nature, known as a collection of the core qualities shared by all humans. Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two of the most prominent political philosophers from the seventeenth century who theorized about the state of nature and researched various aspects of human nature. Thomas Hobbes is an English

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    for which the state or commonwealth is formed is making secure to the citizens the natural right to life, liberty and property which they had in the state of nature. In this state of nature, according to Locke, men were born free and equal: free to do what they wished without being required to seek permission from any other man, and equal in the sense of there being no natural political authority of one man over another. He quickly points out, however, that "although it is a state of liberty, it

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    Hobbes describes the State of Nature as a state where all men are equal, since one individual can kill another individual. With this state of inequality, he claims that this equality has an “equality of hope” in accomplishing one’s ends. If two men seek the same end, and only one can have it, the two men would be enemies and would seek to “destroy or subdue one another” (Hobbes 1651, 2). Hobbes goes further to claim that men are not obliged in “keeping company where there is no power able to overawe

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    Rousseau’s depiction of the “state of nature” begins with the idea that nature hasn’t done anything to make men sociable and that in the state of nature, there is no reason for men to need each other. Rousseau uses an example that the savage man would never consider suicide, therefore the savage man is much more content with his life than we are with ours. He uses his instincts, and his instincts only, to survive. The savage man knows nothing of being vicious, because he doesn’t know what it means

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    People often debate what the state of nature truly consists of. Some people think the state of nature is separate from the state of war, others believe the states are inseparable. One philosopher who discusses the two States is Thomas Hobbes, who asserts that the two states are inseparable, you cannot have one without the other. Within the state of nature, the state of war is inevitable. According to Hobbes, the state of nature causes us to enter into a state of war because of scarcity, conflict

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    evident in his book Leviathan as he criticizes it heavily because what Hobbes refers to as the state of nature is what he believes is the natural condition of people and in this form he believes the strong exploit the weak naturally and he believes the only way in which everyone can be equal is if there is an authority in power to govern people. So to answer the essay question his argument doesn’t state that anarchy rests on the notion that ‘the weakest has strength enough to kill the strongest,

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    beginning, there was a darker side to the preservation of life. Man lived a life of kill or be killed, without any regard for other than his own. Life was solitary, poor, brutish and short. This barbaric and primitive state is what Thomas Hobbes believed to be the State of Nature. Practical reason dictates that when threatened you either act, give up your property, or anticipate for a sign of weakness to act. This means that all have a right to everything so long as it can be attained. People cannot

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    the topic of the natural state of man. These views play a major role on their beliefs and reasoning for why man needs society and government. These beliefs can be easily summarized with Hobbes believing in an inherent selfishness and competition in man, whereas Rousseau’s views on things is far more positive, believing that man is far happier in his natural state, and the root of his corruption is the result of his entrance into society. Rousseau’s theory is based on a state prior to the formation

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