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    “Her Kind” by Anne Sexton was initially called “Night Voice on a Broomstick” holding a concluding stanza that lacked a powerful image, theme, and a prevailing tone. With tedious and constant revision, she finally introduced a refrain, “I have been her kind”, that would forever alter the poem. Dual points of view are labeled "I" in each stanza, however, through the use of the parallel yet double "I," the poem crafts a single character identified as a possessed witch to be later disconnected through

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    Fern Hill by Dylan Thomas, exemplifies this feeling of wishing to return to our days of youth. The poem itself is six stanzas long and is lyrical in structure. The speaker is older and is looking back on his life where he spent his childhood on a farm. He harkens back to how he misses his days of youth and encourages others to enjoy their youth while it lasts. The first stanza opens up with saying how the speaker was young and did not have a care in the world. The first line talks about him relaxing

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    the persona of the poem, and in the first stanza he expresses a fear. He is somewhere he doesn’t want to be and is scared. This is followed by the chorus of the song in which it is made clear that he wants to make a change in his life, but is afraid of failure. At this point the window washers troubles take on the form of deep mental anguish where he resorts to prayer and laments on the physically and mentally troubling aspects of his world. In the next stanza, the window washer comments on the prestige

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    Philip Larkin’s The Whitsun Weddings

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    Philip Larkin’s The Whitsun Weddings As I was reading Philip Larkin’s "The Whitsun Weddings," I was initially struck by the difference between his use of language and the language used by many of the poets we read earlier in the course. The difference between the language of the two W.B. Yeats poems we wrote about previously and this poem by Larkin was particularly striking. Of course, the use of language changed slowly, with each poet we have read between Yeats and Larkin becoming less like

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    The four stanza poem “Stop All the Clocks” by W. H. Auden refers to a time and place where the poet wants everything to stand still. Although we do not know who the subject is, we pick up clues throughout the poem to think it is someone close to the poet because of the line “He was my North, my South, my East and West”. The tone of the poem is very sad which is enforced with the use of internal rhyming scheme aabb and couplets with every two lines. The rhythm helps make the poem flow better because

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    line to the final stanza. Where he strays away from his usual rhythm to get his point across. In the third and fifth stanzas he starts off with the same first two lines “Cannon to right of them, / Cannon to left of them,” (Lines 18-19) but the next line changes from “Cannons in front of them”(Line 20) to “Cannon behind them”(Line 41), showing the progression of the Light Dragoons ride deeper toward the enemy, then he shows the retreating of the forces. Tennyson ends the fifth stanza with “All that was

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    Thematic Comparison of Lovelace’s To Lucasta and Donne’s Song Modern perceptions of love as expressed in literature-- with gender equality and the abandonment of expected role-playing-- did not arbitrarily become pervasive, but are the product of centuries of incremental progression. The seventeenth century in particular provided a foundation for this progression, as poets for the very first time began to question the dictated structure and male domination of the Elizabethan era. Two poems of

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    believe that John Donne makes mediocre claims in his writing, he does however effectively use conceit and imagery to successfully argue his idea that love destroys the heart. In the poem, Donne structures each stanza individually as a different personification of love. In the first stanza, Donne compares love to a plague when he says, “Yet not that love so soon decays…that I have had the plague…” (3/6) It is the latter line that Donne implements his use of imagery and conceit. Love is not often

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    John Keats's Ode to Indolence

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    energy and air. Keats’ poem six stanzas of ten lines each in iambic pentameter, he begins his poem with a passage from Matthew 6:28, “They toil not, neither do they spin”, he uses this as reference for describing the three figures of the poem. In other, simpler words, he is saying that the figures do not work hard, relating somewhat to the title. The speaker of the poem sees but does not identify the figures in the first or second stanzas. Instead in the first stanza, he describes the first two times

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    expectations of this have gone. The poem consists of four stanzas, which are categorized into the different stages of their relationship. In stanza one, he uses the juxtaposition of “flames” and “water”, implying that even when he had just met her, he has had a doubt of the outcome of the relationship. Fire and water is an antonym, yet are the same in the sense that they both are significant to life, but also can be harmful. The second stanza, focuses on their initial meeting. “Like a climbing plant”

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