Free Speech Movement Essays and Papers

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    The Free Speech Movement (FSM) at the University of California at Berkeley started during the fall of 1964. (Freeman, Jo) But there were many events leading up to this point. The Free Speech Movement began to obtain momentum in the fall of 1963 and the spring of 1964 the Bay Area was rocked with the civil rights demonstrations against employers who practiced racial discrimination. (Freeman, Jo) These students believed that this was wrong and felt the need to do something about it. So many Berkeley

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    The Free Speech Movement protested the ban of on campus political activities and speeches. Thousands of students became involved in this protest and together they displayed how much power there was in student activism. In the fall of 1964, the Regents of the university enforced a new ban that blocked students from holding political activities at Sproul Plaza on Bancroft and Telegraph. This was unsettling to them because the Bancroft Strip was a key location that students occupied when trying to reach

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    The Anti-Free Speech Movement on America's College Campuses The nation's leftists, whether in academia or the news media tout themselves as advocates of free speech. Back in 1964, it was Mario Savio a campus leftist who led the Free Speech Movement at the Berkeley campus of the University of California, a movement that without question played a vital role in placing American universities center stage in the flow of political ideas no matter how controversial, unpatriotic and vulgar. From

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    different communication practices within social groups is the concept of the speech community. According to Julia Wood (1997) speech communities are distinct social groups whose members use language in specific ways to achieve shared goals. Distinct groups which have their own language, unique cultural practices, and geographical boundaries such as Koreans, Norwegians, Mexicans, etc. are examples of speech communities. Speech communities that do not use a distinctive language or live in a specific geographic

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    King inspired a social change in which not only in the US but all over the world. The civil rights movement hoped for an equal right for African-American, even though the slavery ended, people are still believed that the black people were lower than them. The movement was not only helping the African-American, but it was also realizing other race that we are all equal. For example, after the movement people realized that Caucasian and African-American have the same equal rights. Caucasian will also

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    political views. . According to Bill Belmont's research of the band, Country Joe and the Fish started as a political band for entertainment. In 1965, members of the Free Speech Movement of the University of California - Berkeley organized a number of demonstrations against the war in Vietnam. Using experience from the Civil Rights Movement, the organizers always provided entertainment before or after the march to grasp the public’s attention. At this time, folk music was making a comeback and bands were

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    in America without hearing about the struggles for social change. From civil rights to freedom of speech, civil disobedience and nonviolent protest became a central part of the sixties culture, albeit representative of only a small portion of the population. As Mario Savio, a Free Speech Movement (FSM) leader, wrote in an essay in 1964: "The most exciting things going on in America today are movements to change America" ("Takin' it to the Streets," 115). His essay is critical of those that maintain

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    our steps to guide the world to an imminent time, one that has never been so close, in which absolute impartiality will be consummated. The development of voting rights in the United States, notably for African Americans, came through rigorous movements from slavery abolitionists and the enactments of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. During the late 19th century and into the early 20th century, America as people had known it was being totally reconstructed in pursuit of providing equality

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    very different. Looking back at my first speech, my evaluator said that my organization was a bit jumbled and they were not sure why my speaker was there. After I read that and reviewed my speech I had to agree. I thought that was my greatest strength and I came to realize that it was not and I need to work on it more and more. I would have to say that my transitions were not my greatest weakness. When writing a paper I struggle with them, but during a speech it is different. I think that my speeches

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    Following the Group speech that was given on November 15, 2013, I have been asked to write this reflection paper to address the nature of the speech and how I can improve. Upon reading the peer review sheets we received from the class following our speech I believe that we all improved since our last speech. Everyone seems to state the most important area for improvement was using filler words too much. I think we as a group seemed to have improved as far as talking towards the audience and using

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