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    Special Relativity

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    Special Relativity Special relativity is a theory that has been accepted by physics as a theory relating to the relationship between space and time. This theory is really important to physics, and all physics teacher such as yourself because special relativity explains the observed fact that the speed of light stays and remains constant regardless of the direction or velocity of its motion. Special relativity now plays an important role in astronomical observation. Special relativity is more precisely

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    Introduction Einstein's theory of relativity is a famous theory, but it's little understood. Essentially, the theory of relativity refers to two different parts of the same theory: special relativity and general relativity. The theory of special relativity was introduced first, and was later considered to be a special case of the more comprehensive theory of general relativity. During the nineteenth century, scientists believed that light is a wave. They reasoned that waves of light need a medium

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    The Special Theory of relativity is an acknowledged physical theory that revolutionized advancements in the relationship between space, and time. The theory is one of the most interesting discoveries that are still used today in science fiction movies such as Star Wars, and Star Trek through the use of black holes, and time travel due to it’s astonishing results, and it occurrence at speeds close to the speed light, which can be appealing to a wide range of audience. This was a harvest from six years

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    Century, Albert Einstein’s “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” or more affectionately known as the Special Relativity paper, confounded our common notions of time, as well as space. The theory could explain many weird phenomena like Stella Abberation , Fizeau’s experiment , Michelson-Morley’s Experiments . It also hypothesized mass-energy (which led to nuclear power plants) and predicted relativity of simultaneity , both of which has been proven at a later time. It has survived the requirements of

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    degree and started working on one of his most influential papers, which was the Special Theory of Relativity. After Einstein completed his Special Theory of Relativity, he moved onto creating the General Theory of Relativity which earned him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921. With the creation of both the General Theory of Relativity and the Special Theory of Relativity, Einstein was able to create his Theory of Relativity which comprises of both theories. Other scientific discoveries that Einstein

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    In 1905, Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity was proposed. The reason that it is so "special" is because it was part of the more complex and extensive Theory of General Relativity, which was published in 1915. His theory reshaped the world of physics when it contradicted all previous laws of motion erected by Galileo and Newton. By mathematically manipulating these previous laws of motion, physicists in the nineteenth century were able to explain such phenomena as the flow of the ocean, the orbits

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    The present paper discusses the relativistic Doppler effect and tries to found misunderstandings in the present state of the Special theory of relativity. The author's conclusion that he found some “blue shift” which contradicts with time dilation is wrong. The weakest feature of the paper is that although the formulas, presented by authors, are in general correct, but they do not support the conclusions the author extract from them, and mistake is hidden in the interpretation. Let's focus on the

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    Explaining Laws in Special Relativity

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    Explaining Laws in Special Relativity Wesley Salmon has suggested that the two leading views of scientific explanation, the “bottom-up” view and the “top-down” view, describe distinct types of explanation. In this paper, I focus on theoretical explanations in physics, i.e., explanations of physical laws. Using explanations of E=mc2, I argue that the distinction between bottom-up explanations (BUEs) and top-down explanations (BUEs) is best understood as a manifestation of a deeper distinction

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    Albert Einstein confirmed the Theory of Special Relativity. This stated that objects moving at a constant speed move in relation to each other. This discovery managed to unify space and time, as a concept, because of how things appear differently in space depending on the speed someone is going. This wasn’t the only concept that was a result of the Theory of Special Relativity, however. Another idea that came about as a result of the Theory of Special Relativity was the Mass-Energy Equivalence.

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    Albert Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity The theory of Special Relativity, written by Albert Einstein in 1905, describes the laws of motion at velocities close to and at the speed of light. It was written to make the laws of motion consistent with the laws of electromagnetism. Special relativity makes two postulates: the laws of physics are the same for all non-accelerating observers and the speed of light in a vacuum is constant, regardless of motion. One of the consequences of these

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    love of geometry and its clear, certain proofs, and had mastered calculus, which he used later for physics problems. At this age, he had ideas of the implications of what could be done with waves of light, which would later influence his theory of relativity (Johnshepler). This is where,

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    Albert Einstein

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    strange. How did they think he was strange? Well, on his first day of class he came dressed in pants that were too short and he had his notes on a single scrap of paper. But after talking for a few minutes, his students knew that they had a very special teacher. He cared about physics and about his students. He enjoyed talking to his students and would interrupt his own work just to help them. He was always welcoming questions and often invited his students to a local cafe or his home to continue

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    The Theory of Relativity

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    determine the speed of the Earth through the ether. However, Einstein later introduced a theory which would account for the unexpected results of the Michelson-Morley experiment and in fact contradict the ether theory all together. The Special Theory of Relativity would then continue to revolutionize the way we thought about space and time. Specia... ... middle of paper ... ...cal situation. Let's say we have a system like the one on the right. A stationary observer in the S frame observes

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    Knower Perspective Essay

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    To what extent is a knower’s perspective essential to pursuing and obtaining their personal Knowledge and sharing it? The prompt, “The knower’s perspective is essential in the pursuit of knowledge.” is essentially saying that an individual’s point of view is critical when it comes to him or her acquiring knowledge. This question is also asking what do humans, as the knower, considers when looking for or when interpreting knowledge? And does our perspective as the knower affects how we can pursue

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    Albert Einstein

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    Albert was born in 1879 on March 14 to Hermann and Pauline Einstein. Hermann ran an electrical technology business which was often on the verge of bankruptcy. Hermann's parents were Abraham and Hindel. Albert's parents moved around Europe several times while Albert was still living at home. He was born in Ulm, Germany. Two years Albert became a big brother when his sister Maja (Maria) was born, at this time his family was living at Munich. At the age of nine Albert entered a school in Munich called

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    Antimatter

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    antiphoton. Protons and neutrons also have a baryon number and their antiparticles have an equal but opposite baryon number. The History of Antimatter The existence of Antimatter was first predicted when Paul Dirac combined quantum theory and special relativity in one equation. This equation, however presented two 'solutions' to the electron. Dirac interpreted this to mean that not only was there an negatively charged electron, but there was a positively charged antielectron which had all the characteristics

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    Newtonian Absolute Space

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    When Newton proposed his axioms describing fundamental laws of physics, he insisted on the necessity of absolute space to a completed theory of mechanics. Absolute space can be best described as not-relationally-dependent space. Newton purports that there is something more to space than just being a vessel to conceptualize positional differences between specific bodies; he claims that there is some objective truth to space -- that spatial differences are not dependent upon the matter contained within

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    Measuring the Moment of Inertia of a Flywheel Objective ========= Measure the angular velocity of a flywheel and use conservation of energy to calculate its moment of inertia. Apparatus ========= Flywheel String Slotted mass on hanger Stop-watch Vernier caliper Metre ruler Theory ====== The rotational kinetic energy can be defined by the equation K=1/2 I ω2. Where I is the moment of inertia of the body about the axis of rotation. In this experiment

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    A Michelson Interferometer is a device used to measure the speed of light in precise optical measurements. It does this by splitting light into two or more beams that recombine and interfere with each other causing the interference fringes. The interferometer basically consists of a light source, a beamsplitter, and two (or more) mirrors to reflect the light. The interference pattern for a Michelson interferometer is circular-- that is, it produces concentric circles of light and dark "fringes"

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    The focus of my research is isolating and locating the "sweet spot" on a baseball bat. I chose to avoid presenting raw data, but to examine the science that causes this reaction. Participants of this sport probably have first hand or an intuitive knowledge of this saying. Locating the "sweet spot" can be done at home. A simple experiment of your on can be done using either a wood or aluminum bat. The only apparatus required is a hammer. Gripping the bat by the handle suspend perpendicular

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