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    Southern Society Exposed in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn One Work Cited        Elaborate uses of race, unprecedented statements about the role of religion and an overall mockery of the society of the old south serve as a method of conveying Mark Twain's opinion of society.  In his dandy riverboat adventure, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain attacks the traditions of slavery, racism, and the accepted traditions of the old south.  He helped expose the hypocrisies of

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    many people found it nearly impossible to attend school. The novel, To Kill A Mockingbird written by Harper Lee shows how the lack of education in society during the Great Depression affected Southerners lives, not allowing them to change their futures for the better. The public school system changed drastically during the Great Depression. Society started to notice the changes during the years of 1930 and 1931, when conditions were at their worst. Many students did not have the right clothing,

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    JoAnn Marshall - The Roles of Southern Women, Black and White, in Society Lillian Smith provides a description of the typical black woman and the typical white woman "of the pre-1960's American South" (Gladney 1) in her autobiographical critique of southern culture, Killers of the Dream. The typical black woman in the South is a cook, housekeeper, nursemaid, or all three wrapped up in one for at least one white family. Therefore, she is the double matriarch of the South, raising her own family

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    Martha McCulloch Williams wrote a letter describing the inaccuracy of the book. She believed that Twain falsely depicted the Southern people throughout the story and used inaccurate facts about their society. Williams’ main piece of evidence is her own observations. She was a wealthy white woman, whose family owned a plantation and she fully experienced southern society. She was also a highly educated and intellectual individual whose observations can be assumed accurate. She accused Twain of

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    look at society. By the time Twain had finished writing the novel in 1884, eight years after it was begun, he had produced The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, his greatest work and possibly on of the greatest works of American literature. With The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain attempted to illustrate his contempt for certain aspects of specifically pre-Civil War Southern society through the eyes of the innocent Huck Finn. However, his focus was not entirely on pre-War Southern society, for criticism

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    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn written by Mark Twain is a novel depicting an era of southern society and environment and the ignorance of southernism opposition to slavery. It is written in southern dialect and seen through the adventures of two boys from different societies running away from civilization. The author bases the novel on the conflict between civilization and natural life. Throughout the novel, Twain seems to suggest that the uncivilized way of life is better: his belief is that

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    story occurs, that he is a boy on the cusp of becoming a teenager. Using this narrative strategy allows Faulkner to view the Civil War from the perspective of a son whose father is a Confederate officer and plantation owner. Faulkner taps into southern society’s expectations of manhood in The Unvanquished. Regardless of the generation in which he is born, a man from that peculiar region below the old Mason-Dixon Line must be acquainted with at least some of the history of the Civil War. Faulkner

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    and "Dry September": sex, death, and women (King 203). Staging his two stories against a backdrop of stereotypical characters and a southern code of honor, Faulkner deliberately withholds important details, fragments chronological times, and fuses the past with the present to imply the character's act and motivation. The characters in Faulkner's southern society are drawn from three social levels: the aristocrats, the townspeople, and the Negroes (Volpe 15). In "A Rose for Emily," Faulkner describes

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    would make southern society less secure in its assumed superiority. The southern “superiority” over Negroes had existed since the time of the slave trade and continued after the emancipation, out of fear. As long as Negroes were considered “property,” they were protected by their “value.” Following the abolition of legal slavery, their economic protection vanished, and the southern white population feared their infiltration with society. Out of fear came hate in the white southern community.

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    Minnie Cooper is also a victim in "Dry September." Minnie is as much a victim of the social standards and practices of southern society as Willie Mayes is. While "Dry September" may seem to be just a story about how a black man is wrongly condemned to death, it is also about the moral and social demise of a woman who is no longer valued in society. Minnie Cooper lives in a society that has no more place for old maids than it has for black men, and that makes her just as much a victim as Willie Mayes

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