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    Colonialism in Southeast Asia 6b.Colonialism in Southeast Asia is not only about the restructuring of local society for the sole aim of economic progress, and not always with tragic consequences. It is indeed true that apart from economic incentives, the western colonialists came to Southeast Asia for political and humanitarian reasons. Also, colonial rule did always result in tragic outcomes. The major factor responsible for colonialism in Southeast Asia was largely political, specifically

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    Exploring Southeast Asia

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    For itinerant travelers, exploring Southeast Asia has always been a sort of a rite of passage into that vaunted list of people who have dared to cross the norm of general tourism. Laos is one such small country, whose name is often dwarfed by its more popular neighbors - China, Cambodia, and Thailand. But, slowly, Laos is also emerging as a popular tourist destination, as the many treasures it has to offer its visitors are discovered. A vibrant history that draws from its own culture, which is predominantly

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    Southeast Asia is certainly a region on the move. Internal and international migration flows are a key feature in this geographical setting. On the one hand, Southeast Asia is home of important work-related migration flows to other countries in the region which are demanding labour but also to international immigration areas, such as North America, the European Union and the Persian Gulf. On the other hand, Southeast Asia also attracts immigration, mostly intraregional. Intraregional migration is

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    Imperialism in Southeast Asia A. In the late 1400s & early 1500s, European traders explored the East Indies 1. In the seaports of these islands & on the nearby mainland a) Portuguese & Dutch merchants enjoyed a rich & active trade until the early 1800s. B. In the 1800s and early 1900s, European imperialism made its way to Southeast Asia as it did to nearby India & China 1. The area became an important source not only of spices but also of the world's tea 2. Later valuable products such

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    Defining Southeast Asia as a region poses several problems. One would first notice how culturally, politically, physically and economically diverse Southeast Asia is throughout its 11 nations but this is exactly what that makes Southeast Asia problematic as a region to define. Whilst most regions are common and bound together religiously, historically or by language origins, the nations of Southeast Asia lacks in commonality due to its vast diversity. Southeast Asia is problematic because it is made

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    British Colonization in Southeast Asia

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    had increasingly threatened the Sultan of Penang forcing him to cut a deal with then Captain of the British Navy in the Southeast Asia region Francis Light. Captain Francis Light, while in Penang, acted directly under command of the British East India Trading Company. The British East India company, commissioned by Queen Elizabeth 1st, began trading operations in Southeast Asia in 1600 primarily focusing on the acquisition and trade of cotton, silk, opium, and spices which were all extremely valuable

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    The Legacy of Imperialism in Southeast Asia

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    The Legacy of Imperialism in Southeast Asia Imagine a tropical island paradise isolated from external influence or interference, with limited localized conflicts. Then a fleet of dark ships sail up to the golden beaches and land. These ships are filled with Europeans, who wish to take over this land for its strategic location and the plentiful natural resources that exist on the majestic lands of Southeast Asia. This straightforward scene, often exhausted at global locations, could be the start

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    Independence Struggles in Southeast Asia

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    Kratoska, P. H. (2001). The emergence of a nationalist movement in East Timor. South East Asia, Colonial History: Independence through Revolutionary War (pp. 201-220). London: Taylor & Francis. Lau, A. (2012). Introduction: Southeast Asia and the Cold War. Southeast Asia and the Cold War (pp. 1-10). London: Routledge. Ooi, K. G. (2004). Nationalism and Independence Movements in Southeast Asia. Southeast Asia: a Historical Encyclopedia, from Angkor Wat to East Timor, Volume 1 (pp. 942-947). Santa

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    Southeast Asia Case Study

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    1. Key Concepts a) Four major religions prevalent in Southeast Asia: 1) Islam in Indonesia and Malaysia, the southern portion of Thailand, northwestern tip of Burma, and in Central Vietnam (among the Cham areas). 2) Buddhism is prominent in Burma, Thailand, and Cambodia. In Vietnam it was introduced by the Chinese and remains in the cultural periphery. 3) Christianity exists in areas of Indonesia, Vietnam (Catholicism), and eastern Burma. 4) Hinduism is found in Bali, interior Java, Sumatra, and

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    Dutch Colonization in Southeast Asia

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    The Dutch’s appearance in Southeast Asia was predominantly a two-stage colonization process. The initial stage of this expansion period arose in 1602 with the charter of the Dutch East India Company. The VOC (Dutch East India Trading Company) had been formed by the State-General of the Netherlands to carry out, for a granted 21-year monopolistic control, colonial expansion privileges representing the Dutch in South East Asia. While at first it may have seemed that the VOC were to enlarge the territory

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