Free Somme Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Somme Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 35 - About 344 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Battle of the Somme

    • 1081 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Battle of the Somme Geoffrey Malins (1886-1940) was one of two official British photographers assigned to the Western Front during the First World War. He is chiefly remembered today for the film The Battle of the Somme shown to huge success in British cinemas in the late summer of 1916.Considered risky at the time, the decision to allow Geoffrey Malins to compile a film based upon the initial attacks on the Somme in July 1916 proved a massive success when put on general release in

    • 1081 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Blaming Haig for the Slaughter of the Somme 1. Source A is a balanced source. It is from a book called Field Marshal Haig, which was written by the historian Philip Warner in 1991 makes this source Secondary Evidence because it was written some time after the war. It contains both pro Haig and also anti Haig parts. Here are some of the pro Haig points, "If the criterion of a successful general is to win wars, Haig must be judged a success". This statement praises General Haig in the

    • 2151 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Battle of Somme

    • 1185 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited

    The Battle of Somme There was fighting all over the world leading up to the battle of the Somme. On August 3, 1914 Germany invaded Belgium. At the end of September the German troops were about 30 miles from Paris. At the battle of the Marne the German army was stopped by the British and French armies. The Germans dug trenches to help defend them when the troops were advancing. The British and German armies tried to go sideways instead of strait into each other and built trenches on the way. They

    • 1185 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Battle of the Somme

    • 1760 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Battle of the Somme The first major German offensive occurred at Verdun, in 1916 against the French, and not long after, in June of the same year the French were on the brink of defeat. Just as this became apparent, the British launched an offensive of their own, along the River Somme; The British commanders plan of attack was simple. They would basically hit the German army as hard as they possibly could (no surprise there), by firing all their artillery at the German front-lines

    • 1760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Battle of the Somme

    • 1174 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Battle of the Somme epitomizes the harsh realities of trench warfare for the Allies and represents the negligent battle planning and technological advancements that are associated with the stalemate of World War One. Trench warfare was common across the Western Front, with similar strategies being employed by both opposing sides. Sir Douglas Haig, one of the British coordinators for the Somme offensive is blamed with an offensive strategy destined for failure. The British offensive, an utter

    • 1174 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Battle of the Somme

    • 717 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Battle of the Somme The Battle of the Somme involved the main allied attack on the Western Front in the 1st World War. It is mainly famous due to the loss of 58,000 British troops on the first day of battle (1st July 1916). The attack ran from 1st July until 18th November and was located upon a 30-kilometre front, from North of the Somme River between Arras and Albert. The offensive was planned earlier

    • 717 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Battle of the Somme

    • 641 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 9 Works Cited

    The Battle of the Somme, or “humanity’s bloodiest battle”, took place between July 1st and November 18th, 1916 (Wikipedia). The German Empire was pitted against the French and British Empires, resulting in over 1,000,000 men wounded or killed, 60,000 of them being on the first day of the battle. This battle was one of the largest and bloodiest battles on World War I, making it consequential to the French, British, and German Empires. Although there were many consequences of the battle the main consequences

    • 641 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 9 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    The Battle of Somme

    • 1497 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    The British launched The Battle of the Somme to achieve two objectives. The first and most important goal was to relieve pressure on the French Army at Verdun, and the second was to inflict as heavy a loss as possible on the German Armies. The Battle of the Somme had to be fought to save the French Army from the crucifixion of Verdun. The head of the French Army, General Fock, and some leading British commanders did not believe this battle would help, but political masters in London and Paris supported

    • 1497 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Battle of Somme

    • 791 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Battle of Somme 'Kitcheners army' was the idea of lord Kitchener, he of the poster 'Your country needs you.' It had been recruited throughout 1915 when it began to dawn on the government that this was going to be a long war. The best and brightest young men of England and Ireland had rushed to the colours; they had been trained and sent to France. Now on the 1st of July 1916 this new army was going to have its first real test. General Haigs plan was simple - based on his ideas that

    • 791 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Battle of The Somme

    • 726 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Battle of The Somme The British forces attacked at the Somme in the spring/summer of 1916, confident of their ability and determined to emerge victorious. They were brought into the battle by the French, who insisted on their help due to the extreme pressure they were under at the time in Verdun. In preparation for the great attack, the British pounded the enemy trenches with heavy artillery for seven days, non-stop. The roar of gunfire could be heard as far away as London, and when

    • 726 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
Previous
Page12345678935