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    31.03.2005 ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE There are times when surreal is so naturally expressed that it becomes real. In One Hundred Years of Solitude, Garcia Marquez perfectly combines extraordinary events with everyday life. The magic realism in Marquez’s novel transforms the extraordinary into reality by the use of religion, myth and belief systems. Although these themes make the novel magical, the story is a representation of the reality of Latin America before industrialism with a Civil

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    The Speeches of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments”, “Solitude of Self”, and “ Home Life” Not long ago, in the nineteenth century, the words that our forefathers wrote in the Declaration of Independence, “that all men were created equal,” held little value. Human equality was far from a reality. If you were not born a white male, then that phrase did not apply to you. During this period many great leaders and reformers emerged, fighting both for the rights of African Americans

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    The Narrator of One Hundred Years of Solitude Who is this narrator of One Hundred Years of Solitude? He or she knows the whole history of the Buendias better than any of them know it. But the narrator is not quite omniscient. For example, the opening sentence (quoted earlier) and Pilar's insight into the "axle" of time are two of the very few places where the narrator claims to be able to read a character's thoughts. Generally, we get to know characters from close observation of what they

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    One Hundred Years of Solitude/Cien Anos de Soledad :  The Buendía Family Bibliography w/3 sources  The family is at the center of Latin American society. It provides a sense of stability amidst economic and political instability. Blood ties often become business contacts, and keeping in touch with as many relatives as possible is an economic advantage. The male is the dominant figure in Latin American families. He supports the family financially and decides the family's residence. As a result of

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    Memory and the Quest for Family History in One Hundred Years of Solitude and Song of Solomon Pierre Nora proposes that "the quest for memory is the search for one's history" (289). In their attempt to reconstruct the communal histories of their people, Toni Morrison and Gabriel García Márquez rely heavily on the use of memory as a means to rewrite the history of those oppressed because of race, class and/or gender in a world where historiography has been dominated by the white man. Memory is

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    The Charater of Remedios in One Hundred Years of Solitude In Gabriel Garcia Marquez's novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, the saga of the Buendia family is used as a thorough and contemplative representation of the nature of human detachment.  The Buendias are plagued with a seemingly incurable solitude; a solitude that they turn to and rely on when they find themselves in times of trouble.  When they are secluded, the Buendias lead meaningless and inescapable lives of habit and routine.  One

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    The Magic of One Hundred Years of Solitude The mystical town of Mocondo brings new hope, fantasy and a never ending ride for the people who live there.  Jose Arcadio Buendia, the main character in Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), yearns for a life of magic and new discovery, so in his seeking he uncovers the town of Mocondo.  "...A village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white

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    Solitude Allusions

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    The appearance of biblical allusions in One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez has been noted by numerous critics. These allusions are not merely additional literary devices, but rather form much of the structure of the novel. Renowned critic Harold Bloom has even called the book “the Bible of Macondo” (Bloom 1), an apt characterization considering that the novel, throughout its course, contains sections that closely parallel the Book of Genesis. - going to add more to this When

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    Colombian-born author and journalist, winner of the 1982 Nobel Prize for Literature and a pioneer of the Latin American “Boom.” Affectionately known as “Gabo” to millions of readers, he first won international fame with his masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude, a defining classic of twentieth century literature. Whether writing short stories, epic novels, or nonfiction, Gabo is above all a brilliant storyteller, and his writing is a tribute to both the power of the imagination and the mysteries of the

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    Progress and Innocence in One Hundred Year of Solitude One Hundred Year of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia-Marquez projects itself among the most famous and ambitious works in the history of literature. Epic in scope, Marquez weaves autobiography, allegory and historical allusion to create a surprisingly coherent story line about his forebears, his descendants and ours. It has been said that there are only about 18 or so themes that describe the human condition. This quote was made in reference

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