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    Comparing Sola Fide and Sola Gratia Sola Fide, or the salvation by faith alone, has become the basis for the Protestant faith. When Luther split from the Catholic Church in 1517, his new doctrine was based on five key principles: 1) grace and sovereignty of God, 2) faith, 3) scripture as the word of faith, 4) the church as the fellowship of saints and the priesthood of all believers, and 5) the fallibility of man and his institutions. As important as all five of these tenants are, the first

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    each other’s theology. At times, they do seem to make opposing statements. The Book of Galatians affirms over and over that we are justified by faith in Christ alone, not by works of our own. Most evangelical Christians agree to that concept of sola fide. We are faced with an interesting dilemma when James famously says, “faith without works is dead.” Martin Luther, himself, felt that the Book of James should be removed from the canon of scripture because of such statements. When one looks at the

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    The Docrtine of Justification & Faith By Grace Jesus is the exemplar of human existence. Jesus' positive confrontation of death in loyalty to God has to do with what it reveals about human existence. This is illustrated in I Corinthians, "For what I received I passed on to you as of first importance that Christ died for our sins according to scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day." He is the "homo verus," the true and complete being who came not to be served

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    The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan tells the story of Christian, a deeply religious man whose self-imposed pilgrimage takes him through a variety of locations in his quest to reach Celestial City. However, to better understand Bunyan's perspective on Christianity as given in his novel, we must examine the life experiences of the author. Born in 1628, Bunyan lived in a time period that was undoubtedly heavily influenced by the Reformation movement incited by Martin Luther only a century earlier

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    Justification by Faith

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    While acknowledging the divergent views of Nygren and Bornkamm that Romans reflects Paul's past experience, this essay, however, sides with the view that the Sitz im Leben of Romans manifests itself as a letter addressed to the social interactions between Jews and Gentiles and the situation of the Roman Jewish community whom Paul hopes to persuade, as in 14:1 and 15:3, to build up a Christian community net-work in order to give concrete support to his mission to Spain and spiritual support for his

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    Justification in The Old and New Testaments

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    When a man is justified before God, he is declared not guilty with reference to the sins he has committed against God. Amazingly, God's "not guilty" verdict does not relate to just one crime, but to every sin the justified man has ever committed or will commit. Paul declares that we have no penalty to pay for sin, which includes past, present or future sins that we may commit. Those who have been justified by faith, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus” (Rom

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    Apostle Paul’s Argument: The central theme of Apostle Paul’s argument in his letter to the church at Rome is found in Romans 3:21-4:25. The first paragraph in this passage was regarded as the most important section of the Bible by Martin Luther King Jr. The significance of this text is attributed to the fact that it provides Paul’s argument regarding the concept of salvation, which he approves in Romans 5:1. In essence, this portion of Scripture not only affirms but also examines the way of justification

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    We Can Trust Scriptures vs. Can We Trust Scriptures? For a Christian, Scriptures are the basis of what he believes. Scriptures are inspired by God and one can be sure that Scriptures never lie, because God simply cannot lie. God leads us ONLY to the truth: “But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all truth. He will not speak on his own; he will speak only what he hears, and he will tell you what is yet to come” (John 16:13). The Bible itself tells us that it is a good teacher

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    Discipleship: James and Paul

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    We see throughout the letters that Paul wrote to the early churches that there have been issues that have led to disagreements. As time has moved on and the church canonized the bible these disagreements have been formed and fortified through hand picking scripture that best defends ones point of view. Often times regardless of the context of passage. One of the most common arguments stems from the Book of James and the idea that it somehow disagrees with idea of salvation through faith that is

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    Jonathan Edwards

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    Jonathan Edwards is well known to be America’s most important early philosopher and most brilliant theologian. Here we see another individual who was highly concerned with the happenings of his time, due to his involvement in various religious and social movements. Edwards’ work primarily concerned itself with the sovereignty of God, an absolute power. Johnathan Edwards was born on October 5, 1703 in East Windsor, Connecticut. His parents were Rev. Timothy Edwards and Esther Stoddard Edwards. His

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    The Epistle of James

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    The epistle of James (named after its author, just like other epistles) addresses the Jewish believers that are scattered abroad as seen in James 1:1. Other than the authorship of this epistle, its apostolic credentials, the main reason of dispute in regards to its canonicity is the fact that James addresses works and its relationship with faith. With Paul’s teachings that focused on salvation that rest on grace alone and that which is gained without works, James here tries to give a lot of significance

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    Luther

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    The pages 87 – 108 are mainly about righteousness. The heart of Luther’s religion is the justification of faith. Luther writes about the different kinds of righteousness and how they relate to God and Christ. Then Luther talked about Paul wanting to setup a doctrine of Grace. Then he jumps into the kinds of righteousness. Luther says that there is a political, ceremonial, human tradition, law, and faith righteousness.(p.88) In Luther’s own words the most excellent righteousness is faith, because

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    “Walking with God is like a spiritual roller coaster.” Statements like this unrealistically express the experience people have in the “highs and lows” of a particular religious relationship. In fact, evangelism does not decline. Perhaps it levels out for a period of time, but eventually it continues to progress in swift, expansive phases (Worrell 4). When a civilization experiences an amount of time in religious staleness, it is imminent that it will, in time, intensify into what is generally referred

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    Justification by faith is of great importance, it is the foundation of our whole position and standing with God. Martin Luther wrote, “ When the article of justification has fallen, everything has fallen.” John Calvin called it “ the main hinge on which religion turns.” Thomas Watson said, “Justification is the very hinge and pillar of Christianity.” The issue of Justification was the primary dispute between the reformers and the Roman Catholic Church, and the problem was, and still is, between salvation

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    Secondly, DiYanni states that in a short story “Its characters are recognizably human, and they are motivated by identifiable social and psychological forces.” (DiYanni 47). In other words, the modern realistic short story has characters with flaws, difficulties, and short-comings; their motivations also come from things that make sense to humans living in a specific society, especially a society of the written time period. Because Amy Tan 's short story is somewhat based on her life, and therefore

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    People all around agree that technology is changing how we think, but is it changing us for the better? Clive Thompson definitely thinks so and this book is his collection of why that is. As an avid fiction reader I wasn’t sure this book would captivate me, but the 352 pages seemingly flew past me. The book is a whirlwind of interesting ideas, captivating people, and fascinating thoughts on how technology is changing how we work and think. Smarter than You Think starts out with a cautionary tale

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    Every person wants to have power and success in one thing or another. However, some people take this power to an advantage, and it becomes the only thing they care about. In "Rules of the Game", by Amy Tan, Waverly is a very gifted chess player. She plays in local tournaments that soon turn into national tournaments, and gradually loses connection with her family to her chess career. Waverly mistakenly breaks apart her relationship with them, especially her mother. Tan believes that no one should

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    Most people think that computers are smarter than their creators (human beings), whereas others believe differently. Some believe that by using the latest technology of multicore processors which are able to perform exponentially large calculations within a blink of eye, these computers of 21st century possess unparalleled processing power and are thus difficult to be outperformed in the highly thoughtful game of chess by mere humans. On the other hand, there are also some who still have utter faith

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    Chess in the Cold War How did Cold War tensions affect the 1972 World Chess Championship? Section A: Plan of the Investigation Through much of the 20th Century, the Cold War (mid 1940’s – early 1990’s) created a state of tension between the United States and the Soviet Union. This tension was sustained through various fronts, such as the nuclear arms race, the space race, and political and military conflicts. This investigation assesses these Cold War tensions as perpetuated

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    Paige Rogge Mrs. Dzak English III, 2B 22 April 2014 Taken Too Far: An Analysis of “Rules of the Game” Some people say that the love between a mother and her daughter is forever; but what about the understanding? In the case of Waverly Jong and her mother in the story “Rules of the Game,” by Amy Tan, there is much miscommunication and misunderstanding. The story is set in mid-1950’s Chinatown and as the story opens, it is Christmas time. “Rules of the Game” is the telling of how a little girl learns

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