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Free Simulated reality Essays and Papers

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    The Simulated Reality Hypothesis The simulated reality hypothesis is a simple idea that says that we, and everything in the known universe, is currently living inside a computer simulation. This idea has been talked about by philosophers for centuries and even has some ties to religion. Sci-fi writers have been writing about simulated reality for years and we have seen it visualised on tv shows yet the idea that we may be living inside of a computer simulation is almost unknown to most people.

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    Intelligence vs. Simulated Intelligence

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    Smith, D. T. and Brylow, D. (2011) Computer Science: An Overview. 11th ed. Prentice Hall / ADDISON WESLEY Publishing Company Incorporated. Available at: http://books.google.com/books?id=LbtoewAACAAJ. Fogel, D. (2009) Artificial intelligence through simulated evolution. Wiley-IEEE Press. Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5311738 (Accessed: February 09, 2014). simulate - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (2014). Available at: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/simulate

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    For centuries, man has dreamt of constructing pristine simulated worlds , existing in a separate sphere from our imperfect reality. From the town of Pullman, a company town south of Chicago to Disney World, attempts to force Utopia have failed, falling prey to the complications of people’s personal desires. The Truman Show, directed by Peter Weir, tells us the story of The Truman Show, an elaborate reality show built around the control of one man’s life. Christof, the director, has created an entire

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    Robert Nozick's The Experience Machine

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    As humans we are constantly in search of understanding the balance between what feels good and what is right. Humans try to take full advantage of experiencing pleasure to its fullest potential. Hedonism claims that pleasure is the highest and only source of essential significance. If the notion of hedonism is truthful, happiness is directly correlated with pleasure. Robert Nozick presented the philosophical world with his though experiment, “The Experience Machine” in order to dispute the existence

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    Simulation and Consumption in The World

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    In his film The World, Jia Zhang-ke constructs a sphere that is free of global borders while simultaneously showing how its workers are restricted within the realm. I will show how the characters’ movement around the simulated environment in The World engages with their role as consumer citizens. According to Sarah Banet-Weiser, people are constructed as citizens based on their role as consumers in a commercial context. Their power in American society is based on their consumption choices (Banet-Weiser

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    warped and constricted by the claim pretending to be its greatest friend—that only happiness matters, nothing else. Robert Nozick does not on the side of hedonistic utilitarianism, he gives several examples to show that there are other elements of reality we may strive for, even at the expense of pleasure. In this essay, I will focus on Nozick's opinion of the direction of happiness and the experience machine, and finally how do I answer the question What is happiness. Nozick analyzes the amount

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    The Matrix a Film by Hilary Putman

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    Senses: The Reality of Experiencing the World In 1999, Hilary Putnam, a modern American philosopher, created a megahit movie called The Matrix. This movie was created to explain Putnam’s perception of the problem of skepticism and society’s knowledge of reality. Putnam presented an idea that could completely alter and destroy the thoughts of the human race, if it was true. The thought experiment behind the movie consisted of our brains being severed from all the nerves connected to sensory inputs

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    is Neo. Neo represents the prisoner from Plato’s cave that was freed. Neo woke up to a reality that was not easy to understand. He awoke to find that there were other humans that were fixed and unable to move by electronic cords, and that what he had thought that what he was seeing during his life was what was programmed by a computer simulation. The similarities of these are based on the perception of reality. The differences between The Matrix and “The Allegory of the Cave” is seen in a number

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    machine. With this experience machine a person could program the next two years of their life, not realizing they are floating in a tank attached to a machine. The experiences that are stimulated seem so real that person will actually perceive it as reality. After the two years have passed, the person will then have ten minutes to ten hours out of the tanks to reprogram the next experience for the next two years (Nozick 43). As a result, the experience machine is the greatest and only stimulus for their

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    An Analysis of William Gibson's Idoru

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    William Gibson's Idoru is a novel thick with implications and extrapolations related to the oncoming and (present) age of electronic para-reality. Stylistically, it is far from perfect, but in theme it has a firm grasp on the concept of the simulacra as it mimics, masks and replaces reality. Gibson's characters are rarely paintings of great depth. While I would strongly disagree with the assertion that they are archetypes cut out from a mold, I would still note that they are not particularly

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