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    The Three Stage Failure of Sense Certainty In beginning his lengthy phenomenology for identifying the pathway in which Geist will realize itself as Absolute Knowledge, Hegel begins at what many considered the most basic source of all epistemological claims: sensual apprehension or Sense-Certainty. Though the skeptical tradition took this realm as a jumping-off point for making defensible epistemological claims, Hegel sees in the sensual a type of knowledge so general and abstract as to be entirely

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    Sense and Sensibility

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    Chapter forty-four in Sense and Sensibility is an emotional confession of Mr. Willoughby to Elinor when he comes to check on a sick Marianne. While this scene is intended to pardon Willoughby, many pieces of this chapter show how undeserving he still is of Elinor and Marianne’s forgiveness. To begin, when Willoughby arrives at the Dashwood residence, he is agitated and short with Elinor. Elinor allows him in, but asks him to calm down with "well, sir -- be quick -- and if you can -- less violent

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    Defective Senses in Eliot's The Cocktail Party T.S. Eliot's play The Cocktail Party, among all its banal or peculiar occurrences, is laced with images of defective senses and perception, particularly of sight. The muddle of reality and illusion confounds the main characters, and their attempts to escape drive the plot. Within five lines of the play's beginning we are confronted with defective senses: "You haven't been listening," (p. 9) complains Alex to the confused Julia when she asks about

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    If I See A Ghost Are My Senses

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    ARE MY SENSES TO BLAME? To complement the full apprehension of the terms which will be used throughout this argument, a number of meanings taken from The Lexicon Webster Dictionary is provided: GHOST The soul or spirit of a dead person. A disembodied spirit. HALLUCINATION (psy) an apparent perception, as by sight or hearing, for which there is no real external cause, as distinguished from illusion ILLUSION A false impression or belief. False perception or conception of some object of sense. A perception

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    Universal Doubt of Senses We are taught, at a young age, how important our five senses are. These senses are essential to survival and are the necessary feedback for our existence. The question becomes though, what are really our senses? Touch, smell, sight, hearing, taste are the ones engrained into us, but there’s more to it, we can sense temperature, acceleration, movement, and even intangible things such as hostility, fear, or even someone or something’s gaze. While questioning why these are

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    Mystifying the Senses: Bimodal Speech Perception My grandmother, like many elderly people, suffers from hearing loss. Recently however, she has begun to lose her sight as well. Curiously enough, though her level of auditory impairment remains the same since macular degeneration has claimed her ability to see, her hearing seems to have deteriorated further. Could this be simply the result of alienation because of the loss of a further sense? This situation led me to wonder about my own hearing

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    Sense and Sensibility

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    ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION – SENSE AND SENSIBILITY "There are such beings in the world… as the creature you and I should think perfection; …where the manners are equal to the heart and understanding…” As said by Jane Austen in an 1814 letter to her niece, this balance of “heart and understanding,” or of ‘sensibility’ and ‘sense’, is the crux of a good temperament, and also of her book Sense and Sensibility (1811), in which she illustrates many opposing forces, including sense and sensibility and empowerment

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    As humans, we are endowed with five senses - sight, sound, touch, taste and smell. They are faculties in our bodies through which we not only perceive ourselves but also perceive the outside world. Each of the senses is adapted to a specific stimuli and have their individual functions; all of which we rely upon. However, certain senses have more value than others; for instance, without the sense of touch, you would not be able to sense pain and therefore would not know if you were inflicting injuries

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    As Immanuel Kant once said, “all our knowledge begins with the senses, proceeds then to the understanding, and ends with reason.” Our senses are an indispensible part of ones life. Our senses allows us receive information from our environment in order to learn, appreciate and understand our surroundings. Sense perception is defined as “any of the faculties of sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch by which the body perceives an external stimulus” (theoryofknowledge.net). It is interlaced with all

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    PLEASURE: THE REALISATION OF PLACE THROUGH THE SENSES “The pleasure of space. This cannot be put into words, it is unspoken. Approximately: it is a form of experience - the "presence of absence"; exhilarating differences between the plane and the cavern, between the street and your living room; symmetries and dissymetries emphasizing the spatial properties of my body: right and left, up and down. Taken to this extreme, the pleasure of space leans toward the poetics of the unconscious, to the edge

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