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    Seneca Falls

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    Seneca Falls In the early 1800's, many of the women in the United States were plain and simple getting fed up with their lack of writes. Men had dominated everything in the past and they were still continuing to do so. Women were finally ready to come forward and voice their opinions about how men and women are created equal. It was now time for women to go out and become what ever they want to be and not have to worry about the fact that they are females. The Seneca Falls Convention would

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    Seneca Falls

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    Title:      The road from SENECA FALLS. (cover story) Source:      New Republic, 08/10/98, Vol. 219 Issue 6, p26, 12p, 3bw Author(s):      Stansell, Christine Abstract:      Reviews several books related to women’s suffrage and feminism. ‘The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady STANTON and Susan B. Anthony, Volume One: In the School of Anti-Slavery, 1840-1866,’ edited by Ann D. Gordon; ‘Harriet STANTON Blatch and the Winning of Woman Suffrage,’ by Ellen Carol DuBois; ‘Woman Suffrage and the Origins

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    Seneca Falls Convention By: Kendra Murphy Do you know how women got there rights? Well it all start from the Seneca Falls Convention. Seneca Falls Convention was a march that lead to girls having there own rights. Over 100 women walked and protest. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott were the first girls to discuss women's rights. On 1915 is when the march happened but they discussed it in July 1848. The Seneca Falls Convention started from two powerful women they’re names were Elizabeth Cady

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    had limited rights during the 19th Century. The Seneca Falls convention was a woman’s rights convention located in Seneca Falls in what is today known as Finger Lakes District (Page 3). This convention paved the road to help women gain rights and to stop being so dependent on men. At this time period women were not allowed to vote, own land, have a professional career, they only received minor education, etc. In an interesting book, Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement, by

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    Seneca Falls Convention

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    The Seneca Falls Convention Woman in early 19th century created the first women’s movement and gain right on their own names which represented start of a great fight over being recognized as an equal human being to men. They were gaining access in many different areas: political, legal and cultural. Quaker women pioneered in these kinds of changes. They had organized women’s meetings at churches and preach sometimes at the cost of their lives. Quakers had many of the greatest

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    “determined to foment a rebellion” if ignored (Russell). At the Seneca Falls convention a large group of women got together to discuss the rights they thought they deserved and were being deprived of, and how they could accomplish their goals. This historic convention was the birthplace of inspirational suffragists, revolutionary ideas, and the Declaration of Sentiments, an extremely clever document that listed the grievances of women. The Seneca Falls Convention

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    The Seneca Falls Convention and Its Impact Susan B Anthony, one of the first women to participate in the women 's right movement said “I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand.” For a long time women were seen as inferior to men. They weren 't capable of the things that men were. They were expected to stay in the household and tend to the children. They were subjected to their own oppression and for a

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    Seneca Falls Convention in Antebellum Times

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    The Seneca Falls Convention took place in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19th and 18th in 1848. The convention was held to address the condition of women in the United States. Approximately three hundred women, including 40 men participants, showed for the convention. This convention marked the beginning of the women’s rights movement that would last for several years to come. First of all, in order to understand the mind set of women during these times one must first consider the times. The convention

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    Seneca Falls Convention The Seneca Falls Convention led to many great people and many events. It was the key to women’s rights and equality for all. It was started because of women who were kicked out of a meeting since they were a girl. It led to the women’s suffrage movement, the making of more resolutions, and more leadership for all of the women. They began to accept women more and more over time. The Women’s Suffrage movement was and effect of the Seneca Falls Convention. The making of more

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    equal. In the essay The Meanings of Seneca Falls, 1848-1998, Gerda Lerner recalls the events surrounding the great women’s movement. Among the several women that stand out in the movement, Elizabeth Cady Stanton stands out because of her accomplishments. Upon being denied seating and voting rights at the World Antislavery Convention of 1840, she was outraged and humiliated, and wanted change. Because of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s great perseverance, the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 was a success as

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    On July 19, 1848, at Seneca falls 300 people gathered to discuss “ a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman” ( United states P2) .This event marked a start in women 's rights movement. The convention was called upon by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott directly after when “ Mott, as a woman, was denied a seat at an international anti slavery meeting in London in 1840. “(Casey, Paula. "Seneca Falls Convention.")Together they call out

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    1. The chosen book titled “Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women 's Right Movement” is written by Sally McMillen in 2008. It is a primary source, as long as its author for the first time opens the secrets of the revolutionary movement, which started in 1848 from the convention held by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Stanton. It is not a secondary source, as long as information from the book appears for the first time. Stanton did not reveal much in her memoirs, so the author had to work hard to bring

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    future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of the women under this government, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to demand the equal station to which they are entitled." (DOS) In 1848, a convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York promoting the rights of women. Believing they were subject to 'a long train of abuses and usurpations,' hundreds of women gathered to hear Elizabeth Cady Stanton, one of the founding suffragettes, read the Declaration of Sentiments

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    On the Road to New York

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    On the Road to New York There is a funny thing that happens when you travel. The people are all the same. Sure they may talk with a slightly different accent, and they may dress just slightly differently, and may think just slightly differently. In the end they are basically the same thing, a human being. I recently took a trip. I was going to a conference in Ithaca NY. Round trip is approximately 3000 miles. Driving time is 20 hours one way. I drove it all by myself in as little time as possible

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    Summary The Seneca Falls Declaration is in parallel with the Declaration of Independence in efforts to create a connection of how the colonies position was under the rule of Great Britain to how American men preside over women. Initially, the Seneca Falls Declaration begins by stating the issue of male supremacy. Men have a position in which “the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitle them” yet have never “[declared] the causes that impel them to such a course.” From requesting further explanation

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    denied to them. Many women felt as if they were being held captive or held prisoner by invisible bonds. For those women who did work out of the home, they finally were struck with a hard blow. Pay for a woman was the half the pay of a man. The Seneca Falls Manifesto was a revolutionary document for the women's document. Modeled after the Declaration of Independence, the authors proclaimed the atrocities committed by the men around them. "He has withheld from her rights which are given to the most

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    just want equal rights. Yet now I have to wonder why those stereotypes exist and where they stemmed from. Were early feminists "butch" man haters? No. Early accounts from women and men of the time prove otherwise. *  ... the 1848 Seneca Falls convention for a female Bill of Rights provoked editorials about "unsexed  women"...which insinuated that they had become activists because "they were too repulsive to find a  husband....These women are entirely devoid of personal attractions."

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    lucy stone

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    B. Anthony for being the most active fighters for women’s rights, perhaps Stone is even more important. The major goal for women in this time period was gaining women’s suffrage. That is what many remember or associate with the convention at Seneca Falls. However, Stone was not only trying to gain women’s suffrage, but also to give women other rights that they did not have at this time. In the mid-1800’s, women were almost on the same social level as slaves. The slave owners were husbands.

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    A History of Contention:Analyzing Parallels in the Rhetoric of the Religious Right One hundred and fifty-six years ago, in 1848, when the first Women’s Rights Convention was held in the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, the concept that women were entitled to fully enfranchised citizenship was a completely foreign concept. Ideas expressed and rights demanded at that convention, and at early feminist conventions organized throughout the next seventy years, were considered ridiculous. Suffrage

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    Sisterhood

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    reproductive choice, and freedom from conventional societal restraints. Massive opposition to a demand for women’s equality with men prompted the organization of women to fight collectively for their rights. The birthplace of American feminism was Seneca Falls, New York. Here in 1948, at a landmark convention, the first wave of women’s rights activists gathered. Their primary goal was to obtain voting rights for women (Moore 1992, 21). In the mid 1960’s, the seeds of oppression (which spread from

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