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    Semantics

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    The study of Semantics allows us to identify the meaning of words and phrases in their literal sense, and helps us to make meaning out of arbitrary sounds and phrases. It has been contributed to by both linguists and philosophers. Linguists used lexical decomposition to understand the features that comprise words and the categories in which the words fit. Philosophers dealt more with the meanings of sentences and truth condition and reference (Parker and Riley 2010: 28).Semantics is still not a

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    Semantics

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    UNIT 2 Semantics: this is a logics and linguistics branch that is concerned with meaning Sentence: A group of words that conveys either a question, exclamation, statement, or command and entail key clauses and perhaps other subordinate clauses, and contains a base and subject. Speaker: a person who speaks Native speaker: a person who has spoken the questioned language as the first language in childhood Knowing: this is the comprehension of terms and vocabularies of a given language Linguistics: it

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    Semantics is commonly defined as “the study of meaning.” Any subject that covers a wide and diverse subject matter, such as “meaning,” will not be merely understood with a single sentence explanation. To begin understanding semantics, one must have a grasp on its different branches, including, general, conceptual, and lexical semantics. While there are almost endless branches, these three primary examples embody the native elements of semantics. Semantics is not defined by black and white rules,

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    . The study of language can be undertaken in various ways .Semantics and pragmatics are two branches of linguistics which are concerned with the study of meaning. Semantics and Pragmatics Meaning can be studied in two ways: semantically and pragmatically. Semantics is the study of the meaning of words, phrases and sentences of what the speaker says. The focus is on what the words and sentences conventionally mean. For example, semantic studies are concerned with topics such as metonymy, prototypes

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    Compositional semantics the meaning of the sentence and longer utterances are studied. The meaning of the sentence to determine the meaning of the components and the way in which they are arranged into meaningful phrases and sentences. Another part of compositional semantics are anomalies in which the semantic properties of words determine what other words they can be combined with. For example, the sentence Colorless green ideas sleep furiously. This sentence follows all the English rules of semantics, but

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    The Types of Meaning Semantics is the study of meaning; it concerns itself specifically with logical and conceptual meaning. Specificity is necessary in this case, as the search for meaning has been the remit of various fields of research and study for centuries - each defining “meaning” according to their own needs. Whilst it is difficult to justify such a demarcation it is nonetheless necessary, to separate the fields of “real world” knowledge from meaning in language itself. Broadening the definition

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    From Lullus to Cognitive Semantics: The Evolution of a Theory of Semantic Fields ABSTRACT: The domain of cognitive semantics-insofar as it deals with semantic neighborhood and semantic fields-is discussed from a historical perspective. I choose four distinct stages in the evolution in philosophy of language: Raymundus Lullus and his Ars Magna (14th century); Giodano Bruno and his artificial memory system (16th century); Charles Sanders Peirce and his diagrammatic logic (19th century); and, Kurt

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    Substitutivity in Semantic Logic

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    Substitutivity The problem of substitutivity has always been a thorn in the side of the study of semantic logic. Why does it sometimes appear that terms that refer to identical objects cannot be replaced with each other in propositions without altering the truth value or meaning of said proposition? Leibniz's Law would seem to ensure that we could perform such an action without anything significant having changed, but this is clearly not so. I intend to look at the history, not only of this problem

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    Fodorian Naturalistic Semantics and Double Disjunctivitis ABSTRACT: Direct Informational Semantics, according to which [X]s represent (express/mean) X if ‘Xs cause [X]s’ is a law, and Fodorian naturalistic semantics both suffer from double disjunctivitis. I argue that robustness, properly construed, characterizes both represented properties and representing symbols: two or more properties normally regarded as non-disjunctive may each be nomologically connected to a non-disjunctive symbol, and

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    Semantic Phenomena versus Pragmatic Phenomena

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    SEMANTICS–PRAGMATICS INTERACTION It seems unlikely that there will ever be consensus about the extent to which we can reliably distinguish semantic phenomena from pragmatic phenomena. But there is now broad agreement that a sentence's meaning can be given in full only when it is studied in its natural habitat: as part of an utterance by an agent who intends it to communicate a message. Here, we document some of the interactions that such study has uncovered. In every case, to achieve even a basic

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