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    American Tragedy: Self-Destruction in a Self-Indulgent Society "The boy moved restlessly from one foot to the other, keeping his eyes down . . . . [and he] appeared indeed to resent and even to suffer from the position in which he found himself" (p.9). Clyde Griffiths always wanted to be somebody---anyone but who he was. Growing up in a poor home of evangelizing, exhorting missionaries, he was not drawn to God but pushed away from Him and his family. Clyde was looking for a way to escape from

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    The deaths exceed thousands each year, almost as many as million lives, and behind this serious issue, there is a simple solution; the solution is school foods. I, and many others, extremely disagree with the current filthiness of school foods that are provided regularly; therefore, the food conditions must be improved. Inside your body, the chemicals clog your blood vessels; ravage your heart, liver and kidney. Their purpose is to subjugate your body and mind. The store of toxic substances inside

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    Bulimia - The Destruction of Self Bulimia nervosa, more commonly known simply as bulimia or binge and purge disorder, is an eating disorder that affects 1 in 4 college-aged women in America, or 1 in 10,000 Americans. The most common misconception concerning bulimia is that it is simply a physical or mental problem. Many people do not understand that bulimia is a disease that affects both the mind and the body, and in its course can destroy both aspects of the diseased individual. Bulimia

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    Self-discovery, Destruction, and Preservation in Frankenstein Mary Shelley's Frankenstein explores the downfall of certain human characteristics, set to the backdrop of creation, destruction, and preservation. The subtitle denoted by Shelly herself supports this idea, by relating the fact that the title can be viewed as either Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus. One scholar, Marilyn Butler, also maintains this by noting, "It can be a late version of the Faust Myth"(302). Shelly uses

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    Journey To Self-Destruction in One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest In One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, the character of Randle P. McMurphy undergoes a gradual journey towards self-destruction. His actions go from the minuscule, such as changing minor ward policies, to the act of trying to strangle Nurse Ratched. All of his actions, minor and major, lead to his self-destruction. He continues this behavior even after he discovers he's only hurting himself with his actions. McMurphy begins by protesting

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    Destruction of the Self

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    William James claimed that the self was divided into the “I” and the “Me,” and that the “Me” was divided into the material, social, and spiritual sub-categories. When the “Me” is attacked, and each subcategory is stripped away, a person can lose the distinguishing characteristics that makes one who one is. This type of psychological, emotional, and mental torture is shown to be used by the Nazi’s in Elie Wiesel’s heartbreaking book, Night. As the Nazi’s imprison and torture the Jewish population

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    Self-Destruction

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    Wuthering Heights seems to be a series of destructive decisions. Heathcliff and Catherine never achieve a life of happiness together; their actions cannot lead to a blissful ending. The other characters are guilty of creating their own strife, whether from personal faults or lack of wisdom. In a way, Emily Bronte’s ability to weave flaws into each person’s character lends a sense of reality or humanness to the novel; no one is seen as entirely good or bad. Without lecturing her readers, Bronte demonstrates

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    Hamlet: The Dionysian Character

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    exemplifies these characteristics throughout the play, which ultimately bring about his own death. Had Hamlet's character embraced physical action rather Dionysian thought, the "something rotten" in the state of Denmark would not have led to his own self destruction (HAMLET, 1.4, 96). Hamlet's inability to think rationally plagues him through the entire play. If Hamlet had not sworn to his father's ghost to avenge his death, he could have instead confronted Claudius about the matter instead of thinking

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    Yank as a Modern Day Oedipus in O' Neill's Play, The Hairy Ape The representation of tragedy today has adapted itself to more humanistic, base and symbolic concerns. Often, they are commentaries on society just as much as they are on the nature of man. Although O' Neill insists that his play "The Hairy Ape" is not a tragedy, but rather a dark comedy, the play follows the definition of a tragedy. The basic points that make up a tragedy still remain the same, even if they have to be slightly modified

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    The Value of Narrative in Ceremony

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    Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Ceremony. Stories reside within every part of every thing; they are essentially organic. Stories are embedded with the potential to express the sublime strength of humanity as well as the dark heart and hunger for self destruction. The process of creating and interpreting stories is an ancient, ongoing, arduous, entangled, but ultimately rewarding experience. As Tayo begins to unravel his own troubled story and is led and is led toward this discovery, the reader is also

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