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    The Sedition Act of 1798

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    For the first few years of Constitutional government, under the leadership of George Washington, there was a unity, commonly called Federalism that even James Madison (the future architect of the Republican Party) acknowledged in describing the Republican form of government-- " And according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of Federalists." Although legislators had serious differences

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    Alien And Sedition Acts

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    The debates that built up over the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 revealed bitter controversies on a number of issues that existed since the making of the Constitution. If something went wrong with the Constitution, the Founding Fathers planed to amend it, but they did not consider how they would amend a splitting nation’s views. It became evident that the nation was tearing apart due to opposing view points. These differences could not be changed by the amendment of the Constitution. On numerous

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    Alien And Sedition Acts

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    Parties were forming, and every step of the process made the groups stronger and more narrow minded, as affiliation spread from influencing intellectual and political aspects to playing a part in the social world as well. The proposed Alien and Sedition Acts appeared to be a simple bill, but considering the growing dissent between the two main groups of the country, the Acts can be analyzed and true purposes and thoughts can become unveiled. In a world where people now control the government, opinions

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    Alien And Sedition Acts

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    ALIEN AND SEDITION ACTS In 1798, when Congress passed both the Alien and Sedition Acts, it was very much constitutional. These acts were definitely in the best interest of America. America was a significantly young nation, at the time, and could not afford to create problems caused by foreigners coming to America. They did not have enough national power to sustain order if everyone was attacking the newly created laws, and many of those rebels being citizens from foreign countries, nevertheless

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    The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 The debate of the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 revealed bitter controversies on a number of issues. Most of the controversies had, however, arose even before these acts; as far back as the penning of the Constitution. The writers of the Constitution knew that as time proceeded, the needs and demands of the nation and of the people would change, leading to controversy. By not assigning specific powers to specific groups/parties, governments, they unintentionally

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    The Sedition Act

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    In response to the French foreign threat, Congress and President John Adams signed the Alien and Sedition Acts into law in 1798. The Sedition Act stated that anyone who “shall write, print, utter or publish, or shall cause or procure to be written, printed, uttered or published, or shall knowingly and willingly assist or aid in writing, printing, uttering or publishing any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States” could be convicted and fined

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    Espionage Act of 1917 and Sedition Act (Amendment) of 1918 On April 2nd 1917, President Woodrow Wilson of the United States of America, ??went before Congress and called for a declaration of war. Both the House and the Senate voted overwhelmingly in favor of going to war with Germany.?# This was an act that led to much resistance among the American people. Not four months earlier the American people re-elected President Wilson, partly because of his success in keeping the United States out of

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    Alien and Sedition Act

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    what it is today. The saying rubber makes things perfect is one such example. It is a pliable material and can be formed or molded into whatever shapes you need it be. Just as our nation is today, it is pliable to our society’s needs. The Alien and Sedition Act demolished this moral standard by passing 4 acts that deny the power of people. The United States at this time was faced with such economic and political problems domestically. Such economic problems as a trade barrier created such turmoil. In

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    In the beginning, of our country, it was the Federalist Party with supreme power. In 1796, John Adams, a federalist, was President and the majority of congress was made up of federalists. John Adams was a very strong leader. He believed in federalist actions very much. He helped bring federalists to their current position. They were supreme, the law of the land. There was only meager opposition: the Democratic-Republican Party (DRP). This new party was led by Virginians Thomas Jefferson and James

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    the second president of the United States, John Adams came into office in 1797. John Adams was a federalist and a pessimistic president, he was skeptical about society and believed they need to be governed. In 1798, congress passed the Alien and Sedition Acts signed in to law by John Adams. These acts were passed in preparation for an anticipated war with France and asserted power to a centralized government. Like John Adams, Alexander Hamilton is one of our founding fathers of the constitution.

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