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    The second half of the 19th century introduced a new style of enterprise to America, Big Business. The 19th century values of work and of being an independent business man clashed with the modern 20th century values of extreme expansion with large work forces and of earning the most money possible. The rise of the robber barons and the captains of industry helped the economy by pushing America into first place in the production of several products and by creating many new jobs. Although these new

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    The Old English poetry of Beowulf is distinguished primarily by its heavy use of  allliteration, or the repetition of the initial sounds of words. In the original manuscript version of the poem, alliteration is employed in almost every line (or two half-lines); in modern translations of the poem this is not so. In lines 4 and 5 of the poem we find: Oft Scyld Scefing                               sceapena preatum monegum maegpum                           meodo-setla ofteah The repetition

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    Charater of Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird During the first half of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee constructs a sweet and affectionate portrait of rowing up in the world of small town Alabama. Harper Lee, however, continues on to dig underneath the portrayal of small town courtesy in the second half of the book. None of the characters in the book are perfect. This begins to show through in the second half of the book when the facade is removed to reveal the ugliness of Maycomb

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    and Prejudice In any literary work the title and introduction make at least some allusion to the important events of the novel. With Pride and Prejudice, Austen takes this convention to the extreme, designing all of the first and some of the second half of the novel after the title and the first sentence. The concepts of pride, prejudice, and "universally acknowledged truth" (51), as well as the interpretation of those concepts, are the central focus of the novel. They dictate the actions of almost

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    The Spherical Image as the Central Paradox in Valediction: for Weeping In John Donne's "A Valediction: for Weeping," the speaker consoles his lover before leaving on a sea voyage and begs her not to cry.  Crying, the speaker tells his lover this poem at the docks before he boards his ship going abroad.  Donne uses a spherical image as the central metaphor in his poem. When Donne uses irony, paradox, and hyperbole including the use of round images such as: coins, globes, and tears he strengthens

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    primarily by its heavy use of  allliteration, or the repetition of the initial sounds of words. The Old English poet would “tie” the two half-lines together by their stressed alliteration (Chickering 4). Each line of poetry ideally contains four principal stresses, two on each side of a strong medial caesura, or pause. “At least one of the two stressed swords in the first half-line, and usually both of them, begin with the same sound as... ... middle of paper ... ...raki, translated by Jesse L. Byock

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    The Overrated Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye is probably the most frequently taught book in American high schools and colleges in the second half of the twentieth century. I am not too sure, though, if the novel deserves the position it has held for so long. The book sees the narrator, Holden Caulfield, a seventeen-year-old boy from New York City, tell the story of three days in his life. The whole narrative is a kind of therapeutic coming-to-terms-with-the-past story, since Holden obviously

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    language but by analyzing each line, different themes and interpretations may be found. A more deeper and figurative meaning to "Birches" is its theme of life and death. The poem begins with a description of the adventures of a young boy. The first half of "Birches" portrays the youthful pleasures of a lonely boy. Frost uses vivid description to create a picture of the birch branches bending under the weight of ice storms. " They are dragged to the witheredAnd they seem not to break; though once they

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    help" indicates to us a frustration between the two parties involved in this relationship. Instead of proving to his readers that this relationship is doomed, Drayton takes this point as fact and builds on it in the second half of the line "come let us kiss and part." The tone in this half is one of acceptance. Since the couple can do nothing more to redeem their failing relationship, they willingly acquiesce to this fact and move on. The term "kiss and part" gives the reader a terminal feeling to this

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    Hamlet: Between Pagan and Christian Hamlet explores the borders between madness and sanity. It is also located, like King Lear, in a frontier area between a pagan revenge ethic and Christian compassion, and between a ruthless, power-hungry adult world and a younger generation with gentler and more conciliatory aspirations. Hamlet's father, who now torments him, was himself a sinner, otherwise he would not have to return to earth as a ghost, demanding revenge. Hamlet is well aware of his father's

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