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    The Scottish Parliament

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    love as Scotland. With the tricentennial anniversary of union, the idea of Scottish independence has again come up for fierce debate. How, I ask myself, did Alex Salmond and his nationalist cronies manage to concoct such a specious solution to Scotland's problems? A question easily answered: on the basis of false, misinterpreted and corrupt data. In 2007, the SNP scraped a narrow election victory in the Scottish Parliament of 1 seat, holding 47 to Labour's 46 out of 129. This forced the SNP to form

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    which plays an important role in cutting down unnecessary electricity usage. Decarbonizing the supply would involve using natural, renewable resources that would produce little to no emissions such as wind, wave, bioenergy, etc. TARGETS The Scottish Parliament has set targets under the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 of a 42% reduction in emissions of six Kyoto Protocol greenhouse gases by 2020 and at least 80% by 2050. In “The Second Report on Proposals and Policies”, Scotland aims to decarbonize

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    Comparing the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly On the 1st of July 1999 the Scottish Parliament assumed its full powers and duties. This was a devolved government, where some legislative powers were transferred from Westminster to the Parliament in Scotland. The Scottish parliament was designed to embody the links between the people of Scotland, the members of the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Executive. The powers of duty are divided between the Scottish Executive (handles ministerial

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    Scottish Devolution

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    legitimacy to a system of government that reflected Scottish preferences. The reason behind the demand for Scottish self-government is that Scotland had the historic status of nationhood before the Union of 1707 and within the Union, has a different set of legal, educational and religious institutions that reinforce a Scottish identity. The Scottish National Party (SNP) was founded In 1934 and In 1960 was found oil in the North Sea, what changed the Scottish public opinion about the Union as the main cause

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    Devolution is an organised system where particular powers within a government are shared and put into operation by different parliaments within and around the surrounding countries, allowing for the establishment of local laws and legislation. When devolution happens, there is no loss of sovereignty or authority for the senior parliament, which still has the power to create and over rule any law in the country. Like many countries, Scotland’s plan for power sharing has been shaped by various historical

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    The National Identity of Scotland

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    the evidence evidence from the field work would be put in the context of the ways in which urban space and nationalistic imaginings are used shape the structural symbolism of the Scottish national identity. Evidence from the field work Observations took place on the Mound, the Royal Mile, and the Scottish Parliament. These areas provided quite tensed experience in terms of symbolism, both inclusive and exclusive of certain aspects of the nation, the state, and identity. The presence of military

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    Housing Crisis in Scotland

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    environments of the individual and impact on the community, they become public issues (Bogue, 2009). One of the most common private problems which developed into a critical public issue appears to be the scarcity of social housing. According to The Scottish Government [TSG] (2013), from the 31st March 2013 there were 184,487 households on local authority housing waiting lists across Scotland. The lack of available social housing is mainly due to stock levels steadily diminishing each year since 1980

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    the whole beneficial results in the Republic of Ireland (as we have seen), a country which had previously shared at least a part of the British parliamentary tradition. The Additional Members System (AMS) came about in 1998 as so did the Scottish Parliament due to the 1998 referendum which led to the Devolution Act. In 1999 and 2003 the conservatives received 18 seats through the List vote under AMS, giving them a much fairer representation of their support nationally in Scotland. The AMS in

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    “A written constitution, rather than gradual reform, is now essential for the UK to claim to be a modern democracy.” This essay will look at how a written constitution, according to some, would make Britain a modern democracy and it is therefore essential that the meaning of this phrase is fully understood before it can be explored in sufficient depth. A written constitution would outline the structures and powers of government in broad terms and the relationship between the different parts

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    The Need For Constitutional Reform No government in modern times has ever been elected with such a commitment to reforming the constitution as the Labour administration that won office in May 1997. Within months of its election, Scotland and Wales were on the road to devolution. Within a year, although in a very different context, the framework had been set for a devolved, power sharing government in Northern Ireland. A year after that the process was well under way for reform of the House

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