Free Scholarly Communication Essays and Papers

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Free Scholarly Communication Essays and Papers

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    Scholarly Communication

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    The current age of digital information has brought many changes to our culture. We see clear evidence of this within the area of scholarly communication. These changes involve the significant increase in the amount of information that is available, the variety of the type of content included in scholarship, the dissemination process and the way scholars access and interact with this information. The academic library has traditionally strived to build collections, organize them for access and facilitate

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    Islam in morned times

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    and teaching. It also aims to advance publication and scholarly communication on religion; to welcome multiple perspectives on the study of religion; to support racial, ethnic and gender diversity within the Academy; and to seek ways to contribute to the public understanding of religion. The AAR's annual meeting is held every year in late November and provides a lively and enabling context for free inquiry, disciplined reflection and scholarly exchange on the world's religions. The Study of Islam

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    The current state of scholarly communication is not the result of one particular cause and will not be remedied by a single solution. Stakeholders— librarians, publishers, and faculty —need to work in conjunction to rectify rising costs and restrictions in access. The evolution of Journal Impact Factors has led to loss of control in the information industry. Even advances in electronic publishing have proven to be an expensive endeavor. Other alternatives, including open access initiatives,

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    The Effect of Electronic Journals on Scholarly Communication In recent years, scholarly communication has virtually exploded into the on-line electronic world. This has brought a number of demonstrable benefits to the scholarly communication process as well as highlighting a number of inefficiencies and obstacles to the full deployment of information technology. However, the explosion has also brought a spate of credulous accounts concerning the transformative potential of information technology

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    New Trends and the Evaluation of Scholarship

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    The advancement of information and communication technologies over the past decade, particularly the growth of the Internet, the World Wide Web (Web), and email, have had an impact on how scholarship is conducted and are re-defining many aspects of scholarly communication. Interdisciplinarity, collaboration, and disintermediation are three aspects of scholarly communication that are on the increase as a result of the advancement of information and communication technology. The trend towards increased

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    The Future of Scholarship

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    years ago. Information and communication technologies have changed dramatically even in the last ten years. Electronic mail, listservs, and the Internet, to name a few, are all parts of the new technology that is re-defining scholarly communication. In her article entitled “Scholarly Communication” Christine Borgman states that “[r]esearch was clustered around three variables: producers of the communication . . ., artifacts of communication . . . and communication concepts.” (146) The impact

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    The Legitimacy of Electronic Scholarly Publishing At most institutions of higher learning in the United States and worldwide the emphasis is placed on the depth and breadth of the institution's research, at least as far as the institution's reputation and renown are concerned. An institution that does not produce much scholarly research in the form of conference activity or publication activity will not carry the same high regard as an institution which is much more involved in conference participation

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    Academic vs Mainstream Writing

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    articles, this essay will point out the differences between scholarly and popular writing by comparing the academic articles by Jamie Shinhee Lee “Linguistic hybridization in K-Pop: discourse of self-assertion and resistance”, the article by Sue Jin Lee “The Korean Wave: The Seoul of Asian” and the popular article by Lara Farrar for CNN ‘Korean Wave’ of pop culture sweeps across Asia. The Structure of Scholarly Articles In general, scholarly articles tend to be very long ranging from 20-40 pages long;

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    The Futures of Scholarly Publishing

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    been the mainstay of scholarly publishing. They bought all the latest, most important books and maintained subscriptions to all the important journals. But in today’s environment of budget cuts and rising tuitions, many libraries (especially those at public universities) are being forced to cut back. Retailers, meanwhile, are increasingly corporate. In an age in which book-selling is dominated by chains like Borders and Barnes and Noble, it is increasingly difficult for scholarly books to reach their

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    resort to using neojargon or pseudojargon or neopseudojargon or neopseudoneojargon. Examples of these forms of jargon are the prefixes 'neo' and 'pseudo.'3. GraikosGraikos is a Greek word that means "Greek." It's the root of much stupidity found in scholarly discursions. In the rivalry for respect, if one side finds an inferior usage of jargon, they are caught in the temptation of Graikos and feel compelled to retaliate by literally speaking a whole new language. Thus begins a "jargon" war, fought on

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