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Free Sarbanes-oxley Essays and Papers

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    Sarbanes Oxley Act

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    dealing with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the new legislation received scrutiny from many, while others felt the Sarbanes-Oxley Act successfully complete its intended goals. As noted earlier, the main purposes of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was to restore investor confidence in publically traded companies in addition to preventing any large future fraud scandals from occurring as they had prior to the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Amongst the sources who praised the Sarbanes-Oxley was The Financial

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    The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

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    today that are using the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) legislation that helps to safeguard their company and their financial records. The Sarbanes-Oxley act began in 2002 and the purpose behind this act was to protect organizations, it had a major impact on accounting and record keeping. Because of Enron, they passed this act for publicly-traded corporations to better implement control to their enterprise data. “Named after Senator Paul Sarbanes and Representative Michael Oxley, who also set a number of

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    The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

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    Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) Name Name of Institution Introduction The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is a legislation aimed at increasing the accuracy of financial statements that were issued by companies that are publicly held (Livingstone, 2011). The passing of this act was a response to some of the financial malpractices that took place at companies such as WorldCom and Enron. According to Livingstone, making ethical decisions is critical because ethical lapses can lead to severe unforeseen consequences

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    The Sarbanes-Oxley Act Overview: The development of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) was a result of public company scandals. The Enron and Worldcom scandals, for example, helped investor confidence in entities traded on the public markets weaken during 2001 and 2002. Congress was quick to respond to the political crisis and "enacted the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was signed into law by President Bush on July 30" (Edward Jones, 1), to restore investor confidence. In reference to SOX, penalties

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    Sarbanes Oxley Case Study

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    Sarbanes Oxley: Which Aspect Has Been Most Effective in Restoring Investor Confidence? Since its passage on July 30, 2002, Sarbanes-Oxley has been one of the most controversial, debated legislations in American history. As a response to a plague of financial crises and fraudulent accounting such as Enron and WorldCom, SOX was implemented to restore the public’s shaken confidence in financial reporting and capital markets by implementing extensive changes in the business sector. Almost 12 years later

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    Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)

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    Accounting Reform and Investors Protection Act at the time when corporations like Arthur Anderson, Enron and WorldCom fell due to fraudulent accounting practices and bad internal control. This bill, sponsored by Mike Oxley (R-OH) and Paul Sarbanes (D-MD), became known as Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX).It sought to restore public confidence in publicly traded companies and their accounting practices, though the companies listed above were prosecuted on laws that were already in place before SOX. Many studies

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    Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Acts: Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Acts are important legislations in the corporate world because of their link to public and privately held companies. Sarbanes-Oxley Act was enacted to enhance transparency and accountability in publicly traded companies. On the contrary, Dodd-Frank Act was enacted to disentangle the confused web of financial service company valuations. Actually, these valuations are usually hidden by complex and unclear financial instruments. The

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    problems for the company and its investors down the road. The Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002 is what enforces such internal controls of companies. This Act requires all United States companies to follow internal control guidelines and standards. Many argue that the egregious scandals such as Enron, Tyco and WorldCom gave Congress the impetus to pass such an act that has strict consequences if bypassed. Violators of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) can be subject to large fines and even imprisonment

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    when there are no checks and balances to monitor the financial statements and to deter a normally honest person. With the scandals, which have plagued publicly traded companies in order to protect the investors Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act or SOX is considered one of the most important laws to be passed in recent decades because this Act forces publicly traded corporations to monitor and maintain a proper system of controls over the accuracy of the financial

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    Background George W. Bush called the SOX Act “the most far-reaching reforms of American business practices since the time of Franklin Delano Roosevelt”. It has been a decade since the Sarbanes-Oxley Act became in effect. Obviously, the SOX Act which aimed at increasing the confidence in the US capital market really has had a profound influence on public companies and public accounting firms. However, after Enron scandal which triggered the issue of SOX Act, public company lawsuits due to fraud still

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