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Free Sappho Essays and Papers

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    women quiet. Sappho and her work is a good example in our readings to represent today’s day and time. Her poems seem contemporary, very modern. The Descent of Inanna ,on the other hand, is a prime example of works we’ve read that represent the past much more. I strongly believe that each generation is a product of the previous generation, and during the Ancient World, women were not expected to write. They were submissive and their religious superior had the final say. Sappho broke these

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    Gender-Based Notions of Homoerotic Love: Sappho and Plato’s Symposium The poetry of Sappho, and the speeches in Plato’s Symposium both deal primarily with homoerotic love, although Sappho, one of the only female poets in Ancient Greece, speaks from the female perspective, while Plato’s work focuses on the nature of this love between men. There are several fundamental elements that are common to both perspectives, including similar ideals of youth and beauty, and the idea of desire as integral

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    Sexual Fluidity in Ancient Greece

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    Print. "lesbianism." Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. 25 Apr. 2014. . Mitchell, Alexandre G.. Greek vase-painting and the origins of visual humour. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Print. Powell, Jim. The poetry of Sappho. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Print. Rabinowitz, Nancy Sorkin, and Lisa Auanger. Among women: from the homosocial to the homoerotic in the ancient world. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002. Print. van Dolen, Hein. "Greek Homosexuality

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    keeping mistresses be so prevalent?Ê One strong indicator of this general dissatisfaction is the prevalence of homoerotic relationships and their benefits compared to the benefits of marriage.Ê Based on textual evidence provided in Plato?s Symposium and Sappho?s lyric poetry, homoerotic relationships seem to be important and often essential unions that do not fit into the social construct of Hellenic marriages.Ê ÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ?We human beings will never attain happiness unless we find perfect love (Plato

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    Sappho's Reception: Use and Misuse of her Work

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    “Ventriloquizing Sappho, or the Lesbian Muse”, Elizabeth Harvey defines “transvestite ventriloquism” as “the male author’s appropriation of the feminine voice,” and “its implications for silencing of women’s speech and writing” were vast and lasting (82). In Sappho’s case, this began with the Ovidian epistle where Sappho leaps to her death for Phaon’s love. Ovid’s appropriation, or rather, misappropriation silences Sappho’s original voice in her work because he writes in the voice of Sappho, with no inclination

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    Sappho’s Tithonus poem bears an interesting duality of historical and literary relevance. Within this essay I focus on the relationship between Sappho and her audience as well as her use of myth, bearing in mind historical context and literary language, and structure. Sappho’s historical background is limited, with scant concrete evidence as to how her poems were performed, what her life was like or what type of relationship she had with her peers. The generally accepted theory is that her ‘circle’

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    Seizure Sappho wrote poems about lust, longing, suffering, and their connections to love. Her poetry is vivid, to the point where the reader or listener can feel the sentiments rising from the core of his or her own being. The poetry truly depicts a realistic picture of the bonds of love. Through the subtle differences of the poems, "A Prayer To Aphrodite," and "Seizure," Sappho conveys the intensity of the longing and suffering of love. In "A Prayer To Aphrodite," Sappho is offering

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    Catullus 8 Analysis

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    In Catullus’ poems 2, 3, 5, 7, and 8, Catullus describes his torrid affair with Lesbia. Lesbia is typically identified as Clodia, a married woman with a documented history of scandals and affairs. Catullus is deeply infatuated with Lesbia in his early poems, expressing jealousy of her pet bird and attempting to hold Lesbia’s attention. In Catullus 8, Catullus has a dramatic change of heart. He begins speaking in third person, giving himself advice just as much as he critiques Lesbia. Though his tone

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    In ancient Greece, men who died in war fulfilled the civic ideal to the utmost.  The women, destined to live out a degrading life, died in bed.  Certainly, not all men died in battle, but every epitaph shows in one way or another, the city would always remember the men who died in war.  Additionally, not all Athenian women died in bed; nonetheless, it was left to her family to preserve the memory of her not the city.  No matter how perfect a woman was she would never receive the same status or level

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    Poetry in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own According to Laurence Perrine, author of Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, "poetry is as universal as language and almost as ancient"; however, "people have always been more successful at appreciating poetry than at defining it" (517). Perrine initially defines poetry as "a kind of language that says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language" (517). After defining literature as writing concerned with experience which allows

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