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    Salinity

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    WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF EXCESS SALINITY ON PLANTS Salt is a mineral that is found both in solid and liquid form. The liquid is called brine. Salt contains two elements, chlorine and sodium, and is known chemically as sodium chloride. Mineralogists call salt that is found in mines halite. Salt is essential to health. Body cells must have salt in order to live and work. Salt makes up about 0.9 percent of the blood and body cells. It has been estimated that there are more than 14,000 uses for salt.

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    Salinity Changes

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    Salinity Changes I chose to experiment with the effects of salinity changes on the polychaete, Nereis succinea. Along with the other members of the group, Patty and Jeremy, I was curious to see whether the worms would engage in adaptive behavior when placed in a tank of water of foreign salinity, or whether they would simply continue changing osmotically until they reached equilibrium with the environment. The first step in our experiment was to simply observe the worms and get a "feel" for

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    Salinity Stress on Plants

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    Salinity Stress on Plants All plants are subjected to a multitude of stresses throughout their life cycle. Depending on the species of plant and the source of the stress, the plant will respond in different ways. When a certain tolerance level is reached, the plant will eventually die. When the plants in question are crop plants, then a problem arises. The two major environmental factors that currently reduce plant productivity are drought and salinity (Serrano, 1999), and these stresses

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    Salinity And Salinity

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    Salinity is a one of the damaging environmental factor that reduce the productivity of plant. (Shahbaz et al., 2011, 2012; Adebooye et al., 2012; Perveen et al., 2012). All around the world 5% of arabale land adversly affected by salinity stress (D. Molazem, E.M. Qurbanov and S.A. Dunyamaliyev, 2013). Salinity affect the global dry land 2.1% (FAO 2003). Arid and semi-arid regions are affected by salinity due limited rainfall, high evapo-transpiration, and high temperature , low osmotic potential

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    hypothesis for their population explotion. For this species to expand its range along the Atlantic coast, it will need to have wide tolerances to temperature and salinity. In 1998 Epifanio found that The purpose of this study is to show the tolerance and behavioral responses of H. sanguineus to varying water and air temperatures, and water salinity concentrations. It is believed that these crabs will be very tolerant to the various extreme conditions that they will be put through. It is the ability of

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    IOOS: Integrated Ocean Observing System

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    environment. This includes global warming and the study of whether or not “long-term changes in the oceans (are) naturally occurring, or…the result of human activities.”1 Without the knowledge of possible fluctuation of the ocean’s temperature and salinity (to name only two factors) over time, it is impossible to say if we are facing a serious rise in the earth’s temperature or if this is simply a cycle the earth undergoes every few million years. Scientists are studying “how shelf water is transferred

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    Biometrics

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    biometrics to stop criminals and to keep track of where criminals are and who they really are. Biometrics has been around for hundreds upon hundreds of years, from when the Chinese first used it to identify children with footprints, to the more advanced salinity recognition that has been developed for today. The use of Biometrics and the technologies that have come from it has made security much more advanced, but it’s getting to the point that maybe even the technology of Biometrics is intruding our privacy

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    outside the body. The two following studies describe the environmental conditions ideal for brine shrimp and the possible genetic explanation for the osmoregulation of brine shrimp, respectively. In the first study examined, “Effect of Different Salinities on the Survival and Growth of Artemina Spp,” researchers Soundaraparian and Saravanakumar designed an experiment to ascertain the ideal conditions for the growth of brine shrimp, or Artemina. In the Introduction, the scientists note the growing

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    information so that a reader can quickly understand the present state of research in that area. Jane chose to look at how increased flooding and salinity might affect coastal wetland soils and species, and she organized the material clearly and effectively. What I liked particularly about this review was that it moved logically from the effects of flooding and salinity on wetland soils to the effects on the plants growing there to the overall effects on the wetland, both in terms of species composition and

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    The Leaching Requirement During Irrigation

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    Salts accumulate in the soil profile over time, therefore, leaching may serve as a form of soil “reclamation”. Normally, leaching curves are developed to determine the amount of water that may be actually required to reduce the initial soil salinity by a certain percentage (NATO, 1994). Although rainfall and the present soil already have saline concentrations, additional salts are added to the soil via irrigation water. Moisture is then extracted by the processes of evaporation and transpiration

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