Free Rwandan Genocide Essays and Papers

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Free Rwandan Genocide Essays and Papers

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    The Rwandan Genocide

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    The Ghosts of Rwanda The Rwandan Genocide. A horrible nightmare for many nations, but mainly for Rwanda. After a potential peace treaty going south, the Hutus, viciously murdered close to 1 million Tutsi. The United Nations and the United States stayed out of Rwanda in fear that another Somalia may take place. This paper is taking a look at the sociological ways that explain the chain events. In the tragedy of Rwanda, there have been different sayings of what was the official cause. In this

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    armies of opposing sides kill each other over political or religious reasons. Genocide is neither of these. Genocide is the killing of a certain group of people that is seen inferior and has no right to be on this earth. You saw this when Adolf Hitler deemed Jewish people of being inferior, and he was set of to kill them off by any means necessary. This was no different in Rwanda, Africa. This is where the Rwandan Genocide took place in 1994. Before colonization in took place in Africa, the Hutu and

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    Rwandan Genocide

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    The Rwandan Genocide was the mass slaughter of the Tutsi and moderate Hutu in the late twentieth century. It was committed by the Hutus and lasted approximately 100 days (from April 7th 1994 – July 4th 1994). During those 100 days, 20% of Rwanda’s total population, and 70% percent of the Tutsi population, an estimated 500,000 – 1,000,000 people were killed. The akuza, the members of the core political elite, started planning this genocide in 1990 based on the conflict going on between the Hutu-led

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    The Rwandan Genocide

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    The Rwandan Genocide was a terrible event in Africa's history that decimated many minorities in Rwanda. The Hutu killed 800,000 people of minority in Rwanda, including Tutsi and Pygmy people in 100 days, and if it was scaled to the length of time the Holocaust took place, the casualties would be more than 34 million people killed. Citizens were told to gather arms and fight against their neighbor, and many obeyed. Before the war By the 1990’s Rwanda was one of Africa’s most populous countries,

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    Genocide is a word not to be taken lightly. Just the mention of it conjures up thoughts of death, destruction, pain, and suffering. Genocide is much more than just mass killing of a people, rather it 's about the destruction of the very tendons that bind a people together, the targeting of a society for complete annihilation and obliteration, and the destruction of the personal security, liberty, health, dignity, and even the lives of the individuals belonging to such group.(Watenplec 1/11/16, Axis

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    Rwandan Genocide

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    the Rwandan Genocide. The Rwandan Genocide included two tribes in Rwanda: Tutsis and Hutus. Upon revenge, the Hutus massacred many Tutsis and other Hutus that supported the Tutsis. This gruesome war lasted for a 100 days. Up to this date, there have been many devastating effects on Rwanda and the global community. In addition, many people have not had many acknowledgements for the genocide but from this genocide many lessons have been learned around the world. To find the cause of the Rwandan genocide

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    “Governments are mandated by international law to protect people from genocide,” said human rights activist, Bianca Jagger, referring to the law that the United Nations failed to uphold during the Rwandan genocide of 1994. The United Nations refused to send aid to the citizens of Rwanda claiming that the atrocities were a civil war. However, this was clearly not a civil war, because only one ethnic group was armed and prepared to exterminate the other ethnic group. The Tutsi ethnic group was defined

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    The Rwandan Genocide

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    For years, Rwanda has been a hotbed of racial tension. The majority of the Rwandan population is made up of Hutu's, with Tutsi's making up the rest of it. Ever since European colonial powers entered the country and favoured the Tutsi ethnic group over the Hutu by putting Tutsi people in all important positions in society, there has been a decisive political divide between the two groups. This favouring of the Tutsi over the Hutu, and the Hutu subjugation as an ethnic lower class resulted in the

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    The Rwandan Genocide

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    Rwandan Genocide The Rwandan Genocide began on April 6, 1994 and lasted for about 100 days (History). The two groups involved, the Hutus and Tutsis, were in a massive conflict after their president was killed. The Hutus brutally killed about 800,000 Tutsis and supporters. This tragic genocide was not stopped by other countries during its peak, leaving the world wondering why. As we commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide, it is important to be informed about the tragedy. The way

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    The Rwandan Genocide

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    avoided, hold within them the lessons and wisdom that should be used to prevent similar disasters. The 1994 Rwandan genocide resulted in over 800, 000 deaths of the Tutsi people, at the hands of the Hutu; the genocide, and the international response to it, is a lesson about the humanitarian responsibilities, successes, and shortcomings of the United Nations. The events leading up to the Rwandan genocide began decades earlier. There has been a long history of “ethnic” tensions, though it is really a matter

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