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    Comparing Rugby and Football The thick, broad-shouldered athlete breathes heavily and grunts with each step as he and his teammates push mightily against the opposition. His arms are locked over his teammates' shoulders, all of their heads down. The two teams are pushing against each other like two moose fighting over territory. He looks down to see the ball, sitting just in front of his feet. If he could just hook it with his foot and heave it to his teammate behind him… This is what every

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    American Football and Rugby

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    Two different rules, two different balls, two different sports; at first glance Rugby and American football seem to have very little in common, but in reality they actually have a lot in common. Many of the fans that declare allegiance to one sport seem to condescend and down the other. Perhaps that is because they are so similar that it is easy to declare that one is better than another. For example you would not say that basketball has a more efficient scoring system than baseball or vice versa

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    Rugby X Football Rugby and Football are two sports that look alike, many people that don’t know the sport will think they are the same, but they are really rough sports they use a lot of power one have more protection then others people says that rugby is rougher then football. There are two histories about how rugby was created. The history is full of confusion and rumors interpreted with fantasy and imagination. The story of the creation of rugby is no exception, coming in several versions. In

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    2013-2014 NFL season there were more than 1,300 injuries, including 87 concussions (Legum). This is a highly physical sport; however Rugby is a high-impact collision sport as well. The players have to exert extreme force in order to get and maintain possession of the ball. When it comes to the risk of injury for Football vs. Rugby, Rugby has a higher risk of injury. In Rugby each hit can encounter a force stronger than a F-16 fighter pilot performing a roll (Rossingh). Thats about 1,700 pounds of force

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    Principles of Coaching

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    skills · advise athletes on the use of legal supplements · evaluate the athlete's competition performance · evaluate athlete/training and athlete/coach performance www.brianmac.demon.co.uk The difference between a rugby coach and an athletics coach is a rugby coach has to lead and care for a whole team, where as a private athletics coach is they only coach one on one a rugdy coach has a lot more players to be train, motivate, mentor, teach, guide, council, lead, mediate, organise

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    communities, Loyola Women’s Rugby has developed an enregisterment that has evolved with time, the addition of new members, and outside influences. Additionally Loyola Women’s Rugby has a developed an unique linguistic niche due a number of influences

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    Violence In Sport Essay

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    years examining the behaviour of professional rugby players on field. The hostile- aggressive acts particularly evident in 21st century rugby league have caused increasing concern amongst industry heavy weights with commissions being authorized in Australia to investigate borderline violence on the field. Violent behaviour in the community is naturally treated as socially unacceptable, however, it is considered entertaining once a punch is thrown on a football field. If we consider the bloodshed and slaughter

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    A Brief History of Rugby

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    field and arenas, into the political arenas and clashes between the classes. Examining the history of rugby throughout Europe, particularly in Great Britain, allows one the opportunity to see how the changes throughout society’s values, norms, and principles are mirrored by the evolution of the game of rugby from the mid-nineteenth century up to World War I. Variations of games similar to rugby can be found throughout history, even dating back to the twelfth century. There was even an attempt to

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    Jessie Pope makes war out to be a game she shows this best in this part of the poem "Who's for the game, the biggest game that's played," also when this poem was written rugby was quite popular so when she writes "Who'll grip and tackle the job unafraid?" it may have made the people think that it was no worse then being in a rugby game. Throughout the poem she uses a extended metaphor she always compares war to something else and avoids writing about suffering and death. Jessie Pope also makes

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    The way that Rosenberg chose to present the war through his poem expresses his dislike for the whole effort. Picturing the fact that a simple rat could be seen as an enemy due to it being on both sides of the war in an obvious hyperbole, but this device is used as a way for Rosenberg to express his beliefs that the war has gone too far. Line 7 states “Droll rat, they would shoot you if they knew” (Rosenberg 2030) when referring to how a rat can easily cross between two opposing sides of the war.

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