Free Royal National Theatre Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Reaction of the Audience The way a play is staged is very important to how the audience views the story and the characters. We have studied 3 versions of 'An Inspector calls'. The original 1946 production, 1954 film version and the 1992 Royal National Theatre production. I will take each of these in turn and see how they are staged differently and how this affects the audience's perception of the characters. The first production I will look at is the original 1946 production. When the

    • 602 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Burning Out in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia Humanity has no intention of fading away, but rather has designed, by its nature, a flash before death, a burning out, if you will. Inherent in the human character is a desire to fight until the end, whether it be physically, or intellectually. In Arcadia, Septimus describes life as a processional march, telling Thomasina, "The procession is very long and life is very short. We die on the march" (Stoppard 38). But as we die, we don't simply allow ourselves

    • 828 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    J.B. Priestley's An Inspector Calls as Detective Fiction The play “An Inspector Calls” starts of in the genre of detective fiction. But, as the play goes on, the reader realises that the genre does also fit into politics and mystery. The play has many conventions of detective fiction that misleads the reader, not through out but near the end of the play. When the reader finds out that there is no revelation scene, one suspects that this play is not detective fiction, but another genre disguised

    • 2136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Real Inspector Hound.

    • 1838 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Real Inspector Hound Contrasting settings, ideals and people dominate The Real Inspector Hound. Almost every character has an opposite, and is otherwise totally unique. Cynthia is opposite to Felicity, Simon is the contrast of Magnus, and so on. Tom Stoppard has included these contrasts for a variety of reasons and effects that combine to create the disturbing effect of the play incredibly effectively. But what individual effects do his characters create by opposing each other so

    • 1838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Comparing and contrasting Jane Eyre to Lord of the Flies The children's childhood in 'Lord of the Flies' is similar to Jane's in 'Jane Eyre' e.g. just like the boys, she is scared of something that may not be real. Jane is afraid to go into the 'Red Room', when Jane is told that she must go to the Red Room she says 'O Aunt! Have pity! Forgive me! I cannot endure it - let me be punished some other way!' She is afraid of the ghost of Mr. Reed who died in the room a long time ago. She has never

    • 1520 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Arcadia by Tom Stoppard is written as a typically postmodern play, it explores this movement throughout the play with the use of features of postmodernism, and by its open ended ending. A few of the key features used during Arcadia which demonstrate the postmodern theme include: characters overlapping at the end, shifts in time from past to present, parallel characters during both eras, similar sets of props used during both eras, and the textual references. Its open ending and satirical style combine

    • 588 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Justice in The Tempest and Merchant of Venice In both Merchant of Venice and The Tempest, Shakespeare proposes ideas of justice and mercy that hold true in both plays. In order to see if the actions taken were just and/or merciful, definitions of these words must be set up. If we were to assume that Shakespeare's definition of mercy was what Portia espoused in act four, scene one, specifically lines 205 - 206, the definition of mercy must be viewed in a biblical sense. Thus, in order to judge

    • 744 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    John Caird’s Production of Hamlet

    • 2595 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 20 Works Cited

    Shakespeare’s longest play has a lengthy production history. Through waves of different Hamlet productions, John Caird’s 2000 production of Hamlet stands out especially because of its lead actor. This National Theatre show, staged at the Littleton Theatre, featured Simon Russell Beale as the titular character. In The Guardian, Lyn Gardner writes that Russell Beale had wanted to be in a production of Hamlet for twenty years and when he got his chance, he didn’t “blow it.” John Caird’s elaborate

    • 2595 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 20 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    for an Actor to Play the Character of King Lear Dear Mr Simon I am writing in reply to your advertisement for an actor to play the character of King Lear in your upcoming production. I have much acting experience and have appeared in many theatre and film performances over the last 40 years. I have previous experience in King Lear, as I starred as King Lear at the New York 'Shakespeare in the park' festival. This production required extreme emotional elements, which I believe I executed

    • 1211 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Directing J.B. Priestley's An Inspector Calls Dear Katherine, I have gathered some information and advice for your part as Sheila in 'An Inspector Calls'. This should help to give you some background information before you come to rehearsals. Best of luck! Jack An Inspector calls is set in 1912, in a time before the war, and when the Titanic was set to take its maiden voyage. Who would have known that in two years time, the Titanic would be rusting away in the Atlantic Ocean

    • 989 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Tempest is undoubted a flagrant example of the various colonial abuses as can be easily reflected in the Prospero’s attitude to the Island, his slave Caliban and his total obsession with controlling the whole island through his absolute power. Additionally the conduct of Prospero towards his accidental find of the island and treating it like a colony highly resembles the conduct of a colonist during the 16th-17th century. Prospero treats this new colony as an exile as like other colonists of

    • 867 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice Introduction The three versions of the Merchant of Venice which I have watched are: 1. Channel 4 television version for their Schools Broadcasting Programmes 2. Trevor Nunn's version 3. National Theatre Company version directed by Jonathan Miller and starring Laurence Olivier as Shylock Act IV scene 1 is an intense scene in the play where we see many of the play's main themes such as justice and mercy, money and status, revenge, loyalty

    • 2268 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    During the 1700s, England’s plays and literature went through a period referred to as Restoration Drama. Throughout the period, there were quite a few playwrights, such as Dryden, Sheridan, and Congreve, and a few different types of drama introduced to the audiences. Dramas included Heroic and three types of comedies, which will be explicated within the essay. It was just before the 18th century that the comedies were becoming more popular with English audiences. Famous playwright Richard Brinsley

    • 1370 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    A taste of honey

    • 1084 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    relationships and sexual conflicts between men and women. The play was first premièred by Joan Littlewood's Theatre Workshop on 27th May 1958 (Pickering 1988). Theatre Censorship in Britain shared much in common with Film. The Lord Chamberlain and British Board of Film Censors employed a system of censorship which depended on pre-viewing and pre-production reviews (Companion to the Theatre 1987). The censorship applied to the cinema set standards of quality differing form the stage, so they introduced

    • 1084 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Brechtian style of theatre that has been commented on time and time again, but also musicals of a sort. Churchill was born in London on September 3, 1938. She lived in England until the age of ten when her family moved to Canada. There she attended Trafalgar School in Montreal until 1955. At this time she moved back to England to attend Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. This is the key place that her career began. While studying English at Oxford she took an interest in theatre. She wrote her

    • 1345 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    OCG

    • 581 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Our Country’s Good, a depiction of the first British penal colony in Australia in the late eighteenth century, not only displays the stagnating tension between officers and convicts, but also explores the struggle of living on land barely inhabitable within an already difficult time period. In this essay, I will dig deep into the ways in which female convicts pushed themselves just to live to see another day, while recognizing how the majority of men viewed women as sex symbols. Considering the contrasting

    • 581 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Effect of Historical Influences on The Development Of The Theatre Royal Bath In The 18th And 19th Century During the 18th and 19th centuries going to the theatre became very popular, and was a common pastime in the evening. During the first half of the 19th century the theatre was at its most popular throughout the two centuries, and throughout the whole of the 19th century it was as popular as it was during the 18th, attracting the same sort of audience size. Today you would take a trip

    • 2267 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Look Back in Anger Critical Overview Look Back in Anger has been recognized as a bombshell that blew up the old British theater. However, when Look Back in Anger opened as the third play in the repertory of the English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre (a company that had been founded the year before precisely to stimulate new writing that would have contemporary relevance), it was not an immediate success. The critical reaction was mixed, but many of the critics, whether or not they liked

    • 2084 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    “I’ve only ever written to escape from hell-and it’s never worked-but at the other end of it when you sit there and watch something and think that’s the most perfect expression of the hell that I felt then maybe it was worth it. (Sarah Kane, Royal Holloway College, London, 3 November 1998).” (Saunders. 2002: 1). Both representative and reflected in this statement made by the British playwright Sarah Kane (1971-1999) (Sierz. 2001: 90-91) is the state of being human. In its literal sense the state

    • 1740 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 20 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    new genres and forms. She then discards them and moves on, opening up possibilities for other playwrights to explore. I think many people writing today don't even realize they've been influenced by her. She has definitely changed the language of theatre. And very few playwrights do that.”’ (Ravenhill). Many agree with Von Mayenburg and this reason is because she has made it a point throughout her career to make the world question all the different range of roles, stereotypes and issues that are related

    • 1607 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays