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    Romantic Poets as Social and Political When the background of the Romantic era is looked at, it can be seen that there were changes in thought and attitudes after 1780 that are closely linked with both the political and social attitudes of the time. We will be discussing how these changes were reflected in the works of the poets. Poets of all era’s have tended to write about what was happening in their own societies at the time. The word political seems to imply that things stand still, that the

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    Romantic Poets and Their Response to Nature Consider how the romantic poets have responded to the subject of nature with close references to at least three poems studied. Consider how the romantic poets have responded to the subject of nature with close references to at least three poems studied, comment in detail on: 1. Imagery (e.g. simile, metaphor, personification.) 2. Subject matter/theme 3. Characteristics of the romantic movement Romanticism was a poetic movement of the

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    John Keats John Keats, an English Romantic poet, was born on October 31, 1795 in London. He was the eldest of four children. His father, who was a stable-keeper, died when Keats was eight years. His mother died from tuberculosis only six years after Keats’ father passed. After he lost both parents, his grandmother gave custody of the children to two merchants, Richard Abbey and John Rowland Sandell. Keats attended school in Enfield until the age of 15. Mr. Abbey took him out of school so that he

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    the early to mid nineteenth century, two great poets exemplified the American Romanticism period Emily Dickenson and Walt Whitman; Furthermore, their poetry was so unique that it emphasized freedom of individual experiences and found the beauty in life and death in their writings. Throughout this essay, we will cover the similarities and the differences of what early Americans considered to be the “saints” of American Romantic poets because each poet uses a specific style and form, literary voice

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    If the Romantic poet is as William Wordsworth said a man speaking to men where does this leave women and children? Discuss, with reference to the work of Blake. If the Romantic poet is as William Wordsworth said 'a man speaking to men' where does this leave women and children? Discuss, with reference to the work of Blake. "In the preface to the Lyrical Ballads Wordsworth, when describing a poet, says that a poet is a 'man speaking to men' and is someone 'who rejoices more than other men

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    Romanticism

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    Romanticism The start of the Romantic Age coincided with the start of the French Revolution in 1789. It ends in 1837. Just as the revolution was changing the social order, the romantic poets were taking literature in a whole new direction. The mechanical reason that pervaded the work of the previous era was replaced by strong emotions and a return to nature. Animals and respect for nature were frequently used subjects in works of his period. The first generation of poets included William Wordsworth

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    A Discussion of The Wound-Dresser and  Leaves of Grass During the late romantic period, two of history’s most profound poets, Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman, emerged providing a foundation for, and a transition into Modern poetry.  In its original form, their poems lacked the characteristics commonly attributed to most romantic poets of the mid to late nineteenth century who tended to utilize “highly stylized verses, having formal structures, figurative language and adorned with symbols” (worksheet)

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    animals in romantic poetry

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    animals in romantic poetry Many Romantic poets expressed a fascination with nature in their works. Even more specific than just nature, many poets, such as William Blake, Robert Burns, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge all seemed fascinated with animals. Animals are used as symbols throughout poetry, and are also used to give the reader something to which they can relate. No matter what the purpose, however, animals played a major part in Romantic Poetry. William Blake used animals as basic building

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    popular format of romanticism was poetry. Three main concepts of romantic poetry are melancholia, idealism, and nature. The works of romantic poets have these three concepts working within them. The Merriam-Webster dictionary describes melancholia as a mental condition and especially a manic-depressive condition characterized by extreme depression, bodily complaints, and often hallucinations and delusions. In the romantic works the poets express their sadness and depression. The Merriam-Webster definition

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    contrast between what might be termed, rather reductively perhaps, 'realistic' and 'romantic' attitudes is then sustained through the next two stanzas: the commonsensical response is now playfully attributed to the narrator's horse which, like any practical being, wants to get on down the road to food and shelter. The narrator himself, however, continues to be lured by the mysteries of the forest just as the Romantic poets were lured by the mysteries of otherness, sleep and death. And, as before, the

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    endless source of inspiration for eighteenth-century Romantic poets. Such notables as Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley envisioned ancient and exotic Hellenic gods in familiar, typically British settings. Douglas Bush says of Keats, "For him the common sights of Hampstead Heath could suggest how poets had first conceived of fauns and dryads, of Psyche and Pan and Narcissus and Endymion" ( Pagan Myth 46). Later writers, clearly influenced by the Romantic world view, would describe idealized pastoral scenes

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    through Nature Samuel Coleridge and William Wordsworth are both fine romantic poets who express their inner connection with nature in a way that alters their life in a substantial way. In both Samuel Coleridge’s, “Frost at Midnight” and William Wordsworth’s, “Tintern Abbey”, one can determine that both poets use descriptive imagery to alter the readers’ visual sense. The similarities are found in the structure in which both poets write. Both Coleridge and Wordsworth lament the past for not being as

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    Shifts in Sensibility

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    During the end of the seventeenth century and early eighteenth century a socio-political shift occurred. Sensibilities transferred from the logic of the Enlightenment, or Neo-classical Period, to those feelings and emotions of the Romantic Age. During the Enlightenment authors such as Moliére & Swift used reason and rational to present their ideas. They address broad socio-political issues with their writings. Moliére in his satirical work, Tartuffe, focuses upon hypocrisy within the clergy. He uses

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    Blakes cry for a voice

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    venerated by modern society, British poet, prophet, publisher, and artist William Blake was the earliest of a long line of reformist romantic poets. Regarded widely as a mad man, Blake was above all else a rebel whose anti-authoritarian spirit, and belief in freedom and individuality formed the basis of his revolutionary poetry. With his own unique style and form, Blake’s poetry outlived its critics, and William Blake is now widely identified as one of the greatest lyric poets of all time. From humble

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    reader to reassess of the poem's first and loveliest image: A "red, red rose" is itself an object of an hour, "newly sprung" only "in June" and afterward subject to the decay of time. This treatment of time and beauty predicts the work of the later Romantic poets, who took Burns's work as an important influence. 'A Red, Red Rose' is written in four four-line stanzas, or quatrains, consisting of alternating tetrameter and trimeter lines. This means that the first and third lines of each stanza have four

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    The Life and Work of William Butler Yeats

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    The Life and Work of William Butler Yeats Born in Dublin in the year 1865, William Butler Yeats would go on to become universally recognized by his peers as the greatest poet of this century writing in the English language. This recognition would come as early as 1828, a decade before his death with the publication of arguably his finest volume, The Tower (Fraser, 207). The son of one time attorney and later well known painter John Butler Yeats, W.B. Yeats was of partially Cornish and Gaelic

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    John Milton's On the Morning of Christ's Nativity John Milton was born in 1608 and died in died in 1674. He was by far the most learned man of his time. He influenced men from the Romantic poets to the American Puritans. Moreover, he relied heavily on the historic Christian doctrine of Calvinism. In the first four stanzas of On the Morning of Christ's Nativity Milton paints a beautiful picture of man's redemption in Christ. First, the first four stanzas of Milton's poem have a distinct rhyme

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    An Explication of She Walks in Beauty

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    An Explication of She Walks in Beauty Many Romantic poets embrace the concept of self -expression through the use of imagination to convey their personal visions of love and life. The power of emotion is evident in Lord Byron's poems. It can be possible that light can be emitted through the darkness of night. In his poem, "She Walks In Beauty", Lord Byron epitomizes the balance between two opposing forces. The two forces involved are the darkness and the light at work in a woman's beauty both

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    William Blake

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    1757 during a time when Romanticism was on the rise. Romantic poets of this day and age, living in England, experienced changes from a wealth-centered aristocracy to a modern industrial nation where power shifted to large-scale employers thus leading to the enlargement of the working class. Although Blake is seen as a very skillful writer his greatest successes were his engravings taught to him by a skilled sculpture. Blake differed from other poets in that he never received a formal education. His

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    Great Expectations, written by Charles Dickens, have many Victorian similarities. Both novels are influenced by the same three elements. The first is the gothic novel, which instilled mystery, suspense, and horror into the work. The second is the romantic poets, which gave the literature liberty, individualism, and nature. The third is the Byronic hero, which consists of the outcast or rebel who is proud and melancholy and seeks a purer life. The results when all three combined are works of literature

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