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    The Romantic Movement

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    The Romantic Movement (1800-1850) Art as Emotion The goal of self-determination that Napoleon imported to Holland, Italy, Germany and Austria affected not only nations but also individuals. England's metamorphosis during the Industrial Revolution was also reflected in the outlook of the individual, and therefore in the art produced during the first half of this century. Heightened sensibility and intensified feeling became characteristic of the visual arts as well as musical arts and a convention

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    The Romantic Movement

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    THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT I. INTRODUCTION In an attempt to analyze music in the Romantic Movement we will look at the following areas: the effects of the Industrial Revolution in music and instruments, the rise on the middle class and its effect on music, interest in nationalism and exoticism, the romantic style and expression in music and the role of men and women in music of the nineteen century society. II. ROMANTIC MOVEMENT The dawning of the nineteen century brought with it a change

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    What Made Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson Part of the Romantic Movement? The Romantic Movement, or period, was from the year 1828 to about 1865. The main feature of the American Romantic period was the celebration and praise of individualism. This time is also considered to be the first period of genuine American creativity. Emotion, instead of reason, became the largest source of inspiration and creativity during this period. All of this was a reaction to all of the constraints that were forced

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    The Romantic Movement

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    The Romantic Movement was a time of transition for art, writing and other creativity, along with freedom to express ones emotions. The Romantics saw nature as something that wouldn’t change, while they were discovering who they were along with their uniqueness. Romanticism appeared along with the Age of Enlightenment, basically being reflected off of it. Since being self-conscious was one of the characteristics elements of Romanticism, the romantics were conscious of their abilities. They chose

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    the fine arts one must consider the historical background from which this movement manifested, as it plays such an influential role in the Romantic artist's development of subject matter and style. The movement itself began around the beginning of the 19th century, and is often dated 1775 – 1830 it is important to note that this was a period of change and revolution in human rights, and the main countries this movement manifested in were Germany, Britain and in France during the French Revolution

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    Romanticism in Germany

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    Enlightenment); this movement permeated Western Civilization over a period that approximately dated from the late 18th to the mid-19th century. In general, Romanticism is that attitude or state of mind that focuses on the individual, the subjective, the irrational, the creative, and the emotional. These characteristics of Romanticism most often took form in subject matters such as history, national endeavor, and the sublime beauties of nature. According to historians, the mind-set of the Romantics was completely

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    idealism, and imagination. What makes a poem romantic is “The ideas around art as inspiration, the spiritual and aesthetic dimension of nature, and metaphors or organics” (Spanckeren 2). Poets that are associated with romanticism are Walt Whitman, Edgar Allen Poe, and Emily Dickinson. Whitman’s poem is “When I heard the learn’d astronomer”. Poe’s poem is “Annabel Lee”. Dickinson poem is “The Soul Selects Her Own Society”. The American Romantic Movement is fully represented by Dickinson, Poe, and

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    Romanticism

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    Romanticism, Romanticism, in a way, was a reaction against rigid Classicism, Rationalism, and Deism of the eighteenth century. Strongest in application between 1800 and 1850, the Romantic Movement differed from country to country and from romanticist to romanticist. Because it emphasized change it was an atmosphere in which events occurred and came to affect not only the way humans thought and expressed them, but also the way they lived socially and politically (Abrams, M.H. Pg. 13). “Romanticism

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    Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary

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    notions of a life that will live on happily-ever-after. It is made complete by the death of the heroin. The outside world is a major influence on this novel. It may be that it is romantic because it was written at the earliest stages of the romantic movement. It also helped revitalized the movement. It gave future romantic writers a model with which to follow. Romanticism at that time believed that the universe was not a machine; that nature and humanity were connected; that feeling was as important

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    creating under the influence of mind-altering drugs, a recurring theme throughout countercultures to come (Weber). Through their literature, Romantic writers expressed their views on abstract realms to find truth in themselves and the world. One of the most renowned features of the Romantic Movement was the visual art. Among the foremost pioneers of Romantic art was William Blake, both a poet and an artist. His works like The Ancient of Days from his 1794 book Europe a Prophecy, which revealed his

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    Roman Empire

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    In the Early 19th Century Romanticism, man becoming one with him self and nature, was a reaction against the Enlightenment of the 18th century. With such people as William Wordsworth, William Blake and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe fueled romanticism with their writings and poems. William Wordsworth, for example, wrote many poems about nature and his beliefs on how life and nature are closely related to one another. In Wordsworth’s Tables Turned stated, in other words, that the human can archive goodness

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    Frankenstein

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    Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley The novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley is an excellent example of the Romantic Movement. The movement took place in the period from the late 1700’s to the mid-1800; it emphasized passion rather than reason and imagination and intuition rather than logic. One of the key concepts most Romantic writers used was, nature is a source of inspiration. They believed that people who lived in an industrialized area were unhappy because the environment around them was not

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    romanticism

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    which authors left classicism, age of reason, in the old world and started to offered imagination, emotions and a new literature that toward nature, humanity and society to espouse freedom and individualism. The main characteristics or Romanticism movements are: an emphasis on imagination as a key to revealing the innermost depths of the human spirit, the celebration of the beauty and mystery of nature, and a fascination with the supernatural and gothic. Washington Irving was a very important author

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    Faust is a Romantic story that encompasses the Romantic movement to the fullest. “Bedazzled,” while encompassing many of these characteristics, has characteristics of the enlightenment, modernism, and postmodernism. Society’s character at the time of production of each storyline plays a huge role in how the story plays out. We can see this in how each desire is portrayed, how good and evil are portrayed, and how each hero gets themselves into their situation. Romanticism was a movement to experience

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    John Keats

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    English Literature Biographical Speech Keats, John (1795-1821) English poet, one of the most gifted and appealing of the 19th century and a seminal figure of the romantic movement. Keats was born in London, October 31, 1795,and was the eldest of four children. His father was a livery-stable owner, however he was killed in a riding accident when Keats was only nine and his mother died six years later of tuberculosis. Keats was educated at the Clarke School, in Enfield, and at the age of 15 was

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    Edgar Allan Poe

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    career as a poet, and collected or corrected poems throughout his career. A quality of enjoyable sounds can be found in poems that readers also consider serious. However, these elements can also exist with themes that are more typical of the Romantic Movement, such as dreams and nightmares Poe handled this through images designed to show undecided states of awareness represented as lakes, seas, waves, and vapors. Nearly all Poe's criticism on poetry was written for the magazines for which he worked

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    Werther as the Prototypical Romantic in Sorrows of Young Werther In Goethe's Sorrows of Young Werther, the protagonist's characteristics and ideas define him as the prototypical romantic personality.  The Romantic Movement emphasizes emotion over reason, an idea that Werther emulates throughout his life.  Werther loves pastoral settings; in nature, he feels most in touch with his emotions.  He rejects rationality and complexity with the sentiment that life is an adventure to be guided by intuition

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    might be able to change it, but when he looks into the lake he sees, with even more fear before, a mirror image of the house in all its darkness. The eye-like windows of the house reflect back at him. This paragraph is the epitome of the Romantic movement and the story itself makes many direct and indirect references to Romanticism. Poe's references to Van Weber and Fuseli are direct references to European Romanticists. Poe wrote this story when Romanticism was at its height in Europe. The neoclassic

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    The Last of the Mohicans as an American Romance In the 1820s, the Romantic Movement emerged in the United States as an embodiment of the American spirit after a second war with Britain. Although the Romantic Movement, or the American Renaissance, began to emerge decades after its European counterpart, elements of Romanticism can be traced to the chronicles of the first explorers who wrote about the beauty and mystery of the New World. Thematically, Romanticism is characterized by its longing

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    The Importance of Blake in Today’s World

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    The Importance of Blake in Today’s World William Blake, who lived in the latter half of the eighteenth century and the early part of the nineteenth, was a profoundly stirring poet who was, in large part, responsible for bringing about the Romantic movement in poetry; was able to achieve "remarkable results with the simplest means"; and was one of several poets of the time who restored "rich musicality to the language" (Appelbaum v). His research and introspection into the human mind and soul has

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