Free Riding Essays and Papers

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    Horseback Riding Abuse

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    The use of bits in horseback riding is a very controversial topic in the equestrian world. The argument that bits are “abuse” and “inhumane” can be found on any kind of horse related website or forum. Bits used in horseback riding are not detrimental to the horse unless they are fitted and/or used improperly. The use of a bit and the type of bit used depends on the type of riding, the horse’s comfortability, and the riders skills. Some horses are able to be ridden in the bit, while others are best

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    Bull Riding Brilliance

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    Summer Series rodeos. There were four rodeos all together, two in Lander and the final two in Laramie. At the first rodeo, I breezed by the competition. I had this one in the bag. There was just one problem. As I was riding, I obtained an enormous blister on my right hand, my riding hand. I could hardly make a fist, let alone squeeze a bull rope. So on the second day, my father and I put gauze all over my hand to cushion it and keep the blister from re-opening. Our efforts failed in more ways than

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    therapeutic riding

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    Therapeutic riding has also been shown to improve the behavioral patterns of a child with autism. Smith says some behavioral patterns are inability to relate to other, sensory of processing deficits, cognitive deficits, self-stimulation, resistance to change, and challenging behaviors(Smith…). Scott lists multi-tasking as one of the skills that is improved with riding. “Multi-tasking-Simultaneously, a rider holds the reins in the correct position; squeezes with his legs; sits erect; listens to and

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    Did you know that horseback riding is the fifth hardest sport, according to TheTopTens.com? If so, why do people say it is easy, and that equestrians don’t work hard enough to do their sport? More importantly, horseback riding is misunderstood and an underestimated sport. People who are misunderstood about horseback riding think that it is easy. Many people think all they need to do is sit there and steer the horse. Truth is, it isn’t that easy. +78,000 people have visited the emergency room since

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    most dangerous eight seconds in sport history”, which eventually became part of rodeo. Bull riding has always been a dangerous sport. Not only is it a competitive sport, it tests the skills and speed of cowboys and cowgirls. Bull riding is the challenge of getting on a bucking bull and trying to stay on while the animal tries to buck the rider off. In this case, the most famous bull rider died after riding the highest rank bull (Takin’ care of business). On October 12th, 1963

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    “Horseback riding is not difficult! All you really have to do is sit there and look pretty.” Anybody who dares to say this should be prepared to face the consequences. Horseback riding is not easy in any way. You have to learn to use muscles that you don’t normally use and having to teach yourself how to communicate with the horse using only your legs- sometimes your voice, but rarely. I’m pushing through those barriers, however, and will continue to progress through the field and grow as a rider

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    Riding the Red

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    “I've told her and I've told her: daughter, you have to teach that child the facts of life before it's too late” (Hopkinson 1). These are the first three lines of Nalo Hopkinson's fairy tale “Riding the Red”, a modern adaptation of Charles Perrault's “Little Red Riding Hood”. Perrault provided a moral to his fairy tales, the one from this one is to prevent girls from men's nature. In Hopkinson's adaptation, the goal remains the same: through the grandmother biographic narration, the author advances

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    The Benefits of Therapeutic Riding

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    decided I would write my research paper on ways to help the disabled. Therapeutic riding has been actively helping individuals with disabilities for decades, and can benefit these unfortunate people physically, mentally, and emotionally. “Therapeutic riding, which originated in Europe, has been actively helping individuals with disabilities since the 1950's” (Shepard). Through equine-orientated activities, therapeutic riding is used to contribute to the cognitive, physical, emotional, and social well

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    Riding the Red

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    “I've told her and I've told her: daughter, you have to teach that child the facts of life before it's too late” (Hopkinson 1). These are the first three lines of Nalo Hopkinson's short story “Riding the Red”, a modern adaptation of Charles Perrault's “Little Red Riding Hood”. In his fairy tale Perrault prevents girls from men's nature. In Hopkinson's adaptation, the goal remains the same: through the grandmother biographic narration, the author elaborates a slightly revisited plot without altering

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    Analysis of Little Red Riding Hood The psychologist Sigmund Freud created many theories on how people are and why they do the things they do. His psychoanalytic theories are used today to for a better understanding of and to analyze literature. Freud’s three key zones of mental process are the id, the ego and the superego. The id is one of the most important of the three when talking about “Little Red Riding Hood” by Charles Perrault. The author tries to show that being impulsive and basically giving

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    The Variations in Little Red Riding Hood

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    The Variations in Little Red Riding Hood Fairy tales are under attack in the United States from both right- and left-oriented pressure groups. (Ravitch, 62-96) From the left, the charges include sexism, stereotyping, distortion, and anti-humanism. (Ravitch, 84) From the right, the charges include immorality and objections to the portrayal of violence, death, and the supernatural. In addition, some critics claim that the tales terrify their children. (Ravitch, 76). In The Language Police, Diane

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    Little Red, Riding Hood

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    Little Red, Riding Hood A Fable Narrative In today’s society, many classic fairy tales fail to make a connection with young readers. The stories in question are either outdated or use vocabulary that is hard to understand. In this adaptation of Little Red Riding Hood, I tell the story of Little Red, a red headed teenage girl, living in modern Los Angeles. If classic fairy tales were modernized I think that more children would be willing to read them and take the lessons they have to offer

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    Psychoanalytic Approach to Little Red Riding Hood Although there are numerous approaches employed in understanding literature, the psychoanalytic interpretation most significantly attempts to utilize the symbolic mysteries of a work. In exclusive contrast to the formal approach, which focuses entirely on the wording, the fascinating aspect of the psychoanalytic investigation is that it searches for a purpose beyond that which is strictly in the text. By insinuating the existence of innate and hidden

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    Little Red Riding Hoodlum There is a teenager named little red riding hoodlum. If this girl sounds familiar, you guessed it right. She was formerly known as Little Red Riding Hood, until she turned to the life of crime. Right now she is paying for the trauma the wolf caused her. She is now in Utah State Youth Rehabilitation Center. I’ll tell you the part of the story they left out at the end that made it a fairy tale. After the woodcutter killed the wolf, the wolf’s brother was furious, so he killed

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    Psychological Analysis of Little Red Riding Hood In the story of Little Red Riding Hood, you hear about the grandmother, the granddaughter, and the wolf. But the reader does not hear much about the mother. In Olga Broumas' poem "Little Red Riding Hood", the reader can hear about the mother's impact on Little Red's life, or the lack of one. At the first glance, Little Red Riding Hood appears as a lament of a daughter who misses a dead mother or who is trying to explain to her mother about her lot

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    just told by someone about the wonders and weirdness of the world. But I never knew that it would occur to the fairytale-land as well. Well, not exactly fairytale-like. So there’s this one ordinary girl called the Little Red Riding Hood. No, she’s not the clumsy Little Red Riding Hood we all knew—she lived in a big city. A big one, like New York. And like her counterpart, she still is the sweetest and cutest child in the whole ci—er no, I mean her school. And despite that, being born in a family of

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    Little Red Riding Hood

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    society and culture determines the gender responsibility of an individual. In the classic fairytale Little Red Riding Hood, the gender strategies appear through the typical fragile women of the mother and the grandmother, the heartless and clever male wolf, and the naïve and vulnerable girl as little red riding hood. In the classical tale of Little Red Riding Hood, Little Red Riding Hood leaves her mother to visit her grandmother, and both the women possess the feminine roles in the society. The

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    Psychological Approach to “Little Red Riding Hood” By looking at Broumas’ Little Red Riding Hood you can apply the three Freudian zones of the psychological approach to the poem, which are the id, superego, and ego. The three Freudian zones allow the reader to look at different aspects that is believed to rule our lives.  Each zone has a different meaning that interrelates with the other.  Broumas’ Little Red Riding Hood has lots of evidence that gives clues to what the main character may have

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    Fairytales in general have evolved through history, like “Little Red Riding Hood.” The fairytale “Little Red Riding Hood” has so many versions that has been told from books and movies. There are many different versions of the fairytale with different messages for everyone. “Little Red Riding Hood” is told all around the world, but one message that is always in the fairytale is danger is around. When telling a child about “Little Red Riding Hood” they understand one message that they should not talk to

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    Folktales such as the “Little Red Riding Hood” by Charles Perrault and “The Grandmothers Tale” told by Louis and François Briffault tell us how appearance and symbolism of different settings develop meanings about innocence and maturity. In the “Little Red Riding Hood” by Perrault conveys to us the meaning behind the red hood worn by the little girl, and how that captures the interest of sexual predators. Perrault also expresses how the little red riding hood was not mature enough to resist the approach

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