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    Dorothy Richardson

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    her writing, Dorothy Richardson is not as widely recognized as the founder of this style. Her mannerisms and thought processes were affected for the rest of her life by her upbringing in a poverty-stricken family. Brought into the world in 1873, Richardson was destined for stereotypical feminine occupations: a tutor-governess in Hanover and London, a secretary, and an assistant. Her mother’s suicide in 1895 completely broke up the family, only adding to the need for Richardson to find a means of

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    Richardson Vicks Inc. (RVI) Introduction Richardson-Vicks, Inc. was a leading worldwide marketer of branded consumer products for health care, personal care, home care, and nutritional care. The company's product line could be traced to 1905, when Lunsford Richardson, a North Carolina pharmacist, formed a company to sell Vicks VapoRub, which he had developed "especially for children's croup or colds." The company experienced rapid growth following World War II with the addition of new products

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    Defoe, Richardson, Fielding and the English Novel The roots of the novel extend as far back as the beginning of communication and language because the novel is a compilation of various elements that have evolved over the centuries.  The birth of the English novel, however, can be centered on the work of three writers of the 18th century: Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Samuel Richardson (1689-1761) and Henry Fielding (1707-1754).  Various critics have deemed both Defoe and Richardson the father of

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    John Richardson's Wacousta

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    interaction of the worlds of the Indian and the European in the novel is so complete; this is not a simplistic narrative of inherent Western superiority, although it does have a certain manner of privileging the West. There may be a few reasons for this. Richardson almost certainly had Native ancestry, and he knew a great deal about the local tribes, having a large amount of sympathy with their difficulties and aspirations. Nonetheless, this is primarily a novel about Europeans and European culture, where

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    The Effectiveness of Weblogs in the Classroom

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    has redeveloped the way students retrieve and use information, claims Richardson (2004). Richardson continues that until now it was not very clear if the internet provided students with anything more than a vast tool for research. One application that has altered this perception is the “weblog.” The introduction of weblogs within school systems has really made a profound impact on the way children learn. According to Richardson (2004), “Weblogs are redefining the way students and teachers use the

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    Emerson’s Models of Nature

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    Emerson’s Models of Nature The main concept which permeates the writing of Ralph Waldo Emerson is that “the fundamental context of our lives is nature” (Richardson, Jr., Emerson and Nature 97). Emerson presents his theory of nature and its relation to man in three essays spanning almost a decade: Nature (1836), “The Method of Nature” (1841) and “Nature” (1844). There are many common threads connecting these works. One of the most notable is Emerson’s belief in the interconnection between

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    The Ethical Dilemma of Euthanasia

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    families witness their loved ones suffer when the solution of euthanasia promises a painless death? Authors Andrea E. Richardson and David Miller of the articles “Death with Dignity: The Ultimate Human Right” and “From Life to Death in a Peaceful Instant” reflect upon their experiences and feelings on these questions. In “Death with Dignity: The Ultimate Human Right,” Richardson introduces the reader to the depressing story about his father. His father, a good family man, had been diagnosed with

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    Are Compact Cities a Desirable Planning Goal? The article written by Peter Gordon and Harry W. Richardson entitled; Are Compact Cities a Desirable Planning Goal? shows various arguments against the reason for compact cities to become implemented. They use the city of Toronto in the beginning of the article to compare it with cities in the United States. Throughout the article many topics and arguments are discussed which are; agricultural land, density preferences, energy glut, the scope for transit

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    Doc Holiday

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    Doc Holiday Doc Holiday could be known as the most skillful gambler, the nerviest, fastest, and deadliest man with a six-shooter. John Henry Holiday was born on August 14, 1851 in Griffin, Georgia. His father was Henry Broughs, and mother Alice Jane Holiday. Their first child Martha Elenore, had died at six months of age on January 8, 1889. Holidays father was a druggist by trade and later became a wealthy planter, lawyer, and during the civil was he was a confederate Major. Holiday suffered a

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    The Last Man and the Plague of Empire

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    jingoism, and religious contempt; therefore, in order to facilitate conversation, I will address here primarily the possible meanings of the novel's few heteroglossic moments, including the "ironic twist or two towards the end" that Alan Richardson mentions, in addition to posing some suggestive, or polemical, questions. The horror of The Last Man may for Shelley lie in its revelation that the operations of nature obliterate both civilized and barbaric, Christian and Mahometan

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