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    RFID Technology

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    like all technologies, barcodes have been enhanced many times over and are being replaced by better, more efficient systems (Bonsor). RFID, or radio frequency identification, is the new system that is replacing the use of barcodes. RFID tags allow users to more quickly obtain information from the object that the RFID tag identifies (Evans, 2012, p. 190). RFID tags are more helpful and will eventually replace barcodes entirely because they allow the user to scan the object without physically touching

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    RFID Tagging

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    RFID, which is radio frequency identification, uses tiny tags that contain a processor and an antenna and can communicate with a detecting device. RFID is intended to have many applications with supply chain and inventory control to be the drivers of utilization. RFID has been around for a long time. During World War II, RFIDs were used to identify friendly aircraft. Today, they are used in wireless systems, for example, the E-Z passes you see on the turnpikes. The major problem until recently has

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    RFID Essay

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    and Security Issues with RFID As you are well aware by now the world has become increasingly technology oriented. Every day we use technology in one way or another. Whether it be simply checking email or being able to turn our entire house on from the simple push of a button on our smart phone. Whether we like it or not, technology is there. One piece of technology that seems to be gaining attention and garnering more research is Radio Frequency Identification or RFID. Radio Frequency Identification

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    RFID Technology

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    RFID is in use all around us. If you have ever chipped your pet with an ID tag, used EZPass through a toll booth, or paid for gas using SpeedPass, you've used RFID. In addition, RFID is increasingly used with biometric technologies for security. Unlike ubiquitous UPC bar-code technology, RFID technology does not require contact or line of sight for communication. RFID data can be read through the human body, clothing and non-metallic materials. Components A basic RFID system consists of three

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    RFID Tagging

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    Radio Frequency Identification Detection (RFID) is a technology that involves a silicon chip and an antenna, which together is called a TAG. The tags emit radio signal to devices that are called readers. One of the things that is important to know about the Electronic Product Code (EPC) is that some people use RFID and EPC interchangeably, but they are different. Would RFID work to track Products? Well, Bar Codes require a line of sight, so a person(s) with a bar code reader has to get right up on

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    Essay On RFID Technology

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    5. Examples of RFID Technology Example 1 : THE TREND TOWARD CLOSED-LOOP RFID "The hype around open-loop, supply chain applications four or five years ago created an awareness of RFID," says Chris Schaefer, director of RFID product marketing at Motorola Enterprise Mobility. "This awareness, over time, has led companies to consider what RFID can do within their own four walls, with a closed-loop RFID application." According to Schaefer, IT asset management is one way in which companies are using

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    RFID Implementation

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    RFID Implementation Once a company decides to use RFID, the most important step in the process is being able to successfully gather the data and manipulate it into meaningful information. Doing this as effectively and efficiently as possible requires a proper RFID implementation, which for many reasons, can prove to be the most difficult stage of the entire process. A company new to RFID will find that many changes have to take place to make sure the implementation is as successful as possible.

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    Basic Information on RFID base on my Research Findings & Understanding We all need technology in our daily lives. Radio frequency identification, or RFID, is used for many sectors. It is commonly used in the IT sector and most businesses have also needed the help of this software. The Software is heavily used in the business industry. This Software enables wireless data collection by readers from electronic tags attached to or embedded in objects, there are systems involve in the making of the software

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    RFID In Production Cycle

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    The Use of RFID in the Production Cycle The production cycle is the set of activities involved in the design, the planning of resources, the scheduling, and the traceability of production activities. Constantly, new technology is adapted to facilitate and offer better productive capability. According to Stankovski, Lazarevic, Ostojic, Cosic, and Puric (2009), the pressure on manufacturers to comply with the market demand and shortage in inventory are enormous. Consequently, producers have to continuously

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    RFID Chip Technology

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    Identification (RFID). Basically, RFID is using radio frequencies to track and inventory shipments. If you've watched television in the last year you've probably seen the IBM commercial where a couple of truck drivers are lost. The point of the commercial is that the boxes "told" the help desk that they were going the wrong way. Now, is RFID going to cause someone to be sitting in the middle of the road to tell the drivers their going the wrong way? No, probably not. However, RFID could possibly

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    RFID vs Barcodes

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    Radio frequency identification (RFID) is a computerized ID innovation that uses radio recurrence waves to exchange information between an onlooker and things that have RFID gadgets, or tags, joined. The tags hold a microchip and receiving wire, and work at universally distinguished standard frequencies. Barcodes are much smaller, lighter and easier than RFID but RFID offers significant advantages. One major advantage of RFID is that the innovation doesn't oblige any observable pathway the tags could

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    RFID-Enabled Applications

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    RFID-enabled applications have grown at a tremendous rate and hence, it has been one of the major research interests from past few years. RFID, in-particular passive UHF RFID, has been used for a wide variety of applications ranging from the familiar access control to supply chain management, library item tracking, homeland security applications, toll collection, and in aviation industry. Its ability of attaching information to the real-world products cheaply and can be retrieved without requiring

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    Radio Frequency Identification Introduction RFID is an acronym for Radio Frequency Identification. It is an automatic identification technique that helps to identify and track the objects, people or animals through radio frequency waves. This technology enables wireless data communications. Data storing and retrieving is done through electromagnetic transmission to an RF compatible integrated circuit. It provides a link to data without the need to make physical contact with the object and does

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    While the potential benefits of RFID technology are clear and abundant, there is a definite need to regulate the development and implementation of the RFID technology. Not only must standards of regulation and operation be developed, but RFID technology raises privacy and security issues because of the passive and open nature of the technology. In order for the RFID tag industry to be successful in implementation there needs to be uniform standards and regulation so that tags and readers from

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    RFID: A Future Potential Technology

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    Abstract: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology uses radio frequency to track or detect objects using tags and readers. This is similar to the barcode detection but barcode detection requires the object to be in the line of sight. Due to the wireless nature of RFID, we find its use in various applications such as in retail management, healthcare, toll stations, postal service and many other areas. However, RFID has various problems and concerns associated with it. This paper focuses on

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    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)

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    RFID stands for Radio Frequency Identification. RFID is the use of a wireless non-contact system that uses radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data from a tag attached to an object (Wikipedia.com, 2012). RFID is a type of identification system devices that stored data, identification or location of the products. The RFID tag can be put onto an object and used to track and manage inventory, assets, people, etc. For example, it can be put into cars, computer equipment, books, mobile

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    RFID: We Can But Should We?

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    We Can But Should We? How far is going too far? Imagine a world where an individual’s complete and accurate medical history can be accessed and updated by simply scanning a microchip or radio frequency identification device (RFID) that is implanted into the body. Envision a patient arriving at point-of-care; the chip that is embedding into the patient’s body would be scanned to upload the patients’ health information into the providers’ health information system (HIS). During this encounter,

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    Benefits of RFID in Supply Chain Management

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    Introduction Overview of Automatic Identification techniques used in SCM Automatic identification is a technique which is used as an identification method for keeping appropriate stock units in the supply chain management, uses technologies such as RFID, barcodes etc. (Automatic Identification and Its Role in Warehouse Management, 2013). Automatic identification is a process of automatically recognizing the items, gathering the information about them, and entering that information right into computers

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    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)

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    The innovation of the RFID chip or the Radio Frequency Identification has been a critical piece of technology that has been around since the early/mid 20th century (est 1938). Functions of a radio frequency identification (RFID) tagging system involves a tag and a reader. When scanned, the antenna within the tag picks up the radio wave and sends a response back to the reader. This technology is being used for both short range and also long range identification, in the short-range identification

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    part in many RFID applications for providing security and privacy. The use of billions of tags worldwide would make computing vulnerable to security threats. Authentication has a significant part in many RFID applications for providing security and privacy. Security experts have been working on creation of a sound authentication mechanism for RFID applications. This paper investigates the possible privacy and security threats to RFID systems, and analyses some of previously proposed RFID protocols.

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