Free Reviving Ophelia Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Reviving Ophelia

    • 1891 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    Reviving Ophelia Adolescent girls growing up in today’s society endure many more hardships than in previous years. Adolescence is no longer a time of endless sunny days spent on the back porch with a glass of country time lemonade and a smile extending ear to ear. Adolescence for girls is now generalized as a dark and depressing period of life that often seems hopeless and never ending. Mary Pipher PH.D tries to illustrate just how drastically life has changed over the years for teenage girls

    • 1891 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Reviving Ophelia

    • 908 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Reviving Ophelia Mary Pipher, author of the book Reviving Ophelia, has made many observations concerning young adolescent girls in our society. She wrote this book in 1994, roughly eleven years ago. Although some of her observations made in the past are not still accurate in today’s world, there are many that are still present in 2005. The primary focus of Pipher’s comments is to explain how young girls are no longer being protected within our society. This female inferiority idea has been imbedded

    • 908 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    any one of our forms of popular culture, whether it’s TV, movies, music videos, magazines, and advertisements, even billboards. “Women’s bodies sell products that have nothing to do with women, like tires, cars, liquor, and guns” (Pipher, Reviving Ophelia 42). As if using women’s bodies to sell completely unrelated products weren’t harmful enough, the women used to sell these products are a far cry from what most women in America look like. The average American woman is 5’4” and weighs 140

    • 1185 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    as they grow up? What causes this diminishment of self? What transforms them from the happy, confident people they are in childhood to the self-critical, sullen, and frightened adolescents they become? Psychologist Mary Pipher, author of Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls talks about the "isms" that meet girls at the threshhold of adolescence--sexism, capitalism, and lookism. Who girls can be is no longer a wide-open playing field. They find themselves judged by how well

    • 1480 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Book Report on Reviving Ophelia In this book therapist Mary Pipher writes about her experiences at work with adolescent girls. It is intended to make the reader aware of the perils of being a teenager in today's sexualized and media-saturated culture. She talks about how this new and more hostile environment affects adolescent girls' emotional growth and development, and how hard it is to stay true to yourself while trying to fit in with peers. For the most part this book is Dr. Pipher's attempt

    • 723 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    A Review of Mary Pipher”s “Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls”, Laura E. Berk's “Infants and Children: Prenatal Through Middle Childhood”, and Lina A. Ricciardelli's “Self-esteem and Negative Affect as Moderators of Sociocultural Influences on Body Dissatisfaction, Strategies to Decrease Weight, and Strategies to Increase Muscles Among Adolescent Boys and Girls” Adolescence is one of the most difficult times for development. This difficulty is experienced very differently

    • 1530 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hamlet - Shakespeare's Ophelia as Modern Icon

    • 3387 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 15 Works Cited

    Shakespeare's Ophelia as Modern Icon Shakespeare's Ophelia is not lacking in attention. As one of Shakespeare's most popular female characters she has enjoyed many appellations from the bard. '"Fair Ophelia." "Most beautified Ophelia." "Pretty Ophelia." "Sweet Ophelia." "Dear Ophelia." "Beautiful Ophelia…sweet maid…poor wretch." "Poor Ophelia."' (Vest 1) All of these names for Ophelia can be found in Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Since Shakespeare's incarnation of Ophelia many

    • 3387 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 15 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Innocence of Gertrude and Ophelia “Pretty Ophelia,” as Claudius calls her, is the most innocent victim of Hamlet’s revenge in Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. Hamlet has fallen in love with Ophelia after the death of his father. Ophelia “sucked the honey of his music vows” and returned Hamlet’s affection. But when her father had challenged Hamlet’s true intentions, Ophelia could only say: “I do not know, my lord, what I should think.” Ophelia was used to relying on her father’s directions and she

    • 719 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Miss Ophelia in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin Being the only Northerner to take a focal role in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Miss Ophelia is a realistic adaptation of the ideal woman that Harriet Beecher Stowe proposes with the images of the other perfect women. She is educated, single, independent, ambitious, and motivated by a certain sense of duty. Unlike the other women in the novel, she is the one with the most masculine mannerisms: she relies on her thoughts rather than her emotions

    • 1106 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hamlet -- the Unlike Characters of Gertrude and Ophelia The Shakespearean tragedy Hamlet features two ladies who are very unlike in character. Queen Gertrude, denounced by the ghost as faithless to King Hamlet, is pictured as evil by many, while Ophelia is seen as pure and obedient and full of good virtues. Let’s explore these two unlike people. Rebecca Smith in “Scheming Adulteress or Loving Mother” presents an unusually “clean” image of the present queen that is not consistent with

    • 3414 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 17 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Tragedy of Lady Ophelia of Hamlet Melancholy, grief, and madness pervade Shakespeare's great tragedy, Hamlet.  The emotional maladies presented within Hamlet, not only allow the audience to sympathize with prince Hamlet, but also with the tragic lady Ophelia as well.  It is Ophelia who suffers at her lover's discretion because of decisions she was obligated to make on behalf of her weak societal position. Hamlet provides his own self-torture and does fall victim to melancholia and grief

    • 1356 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sane Hamlet and Mad Ophelia In Hamlet, Shakespeare incorporates a theme of madness with two characters: one truly mad, and one only acting mad to serve a motive. The madness of Hamlet is frequently disputed. This paper argues that the contrapuntal character in the play, namely Ophelia, acts as a balancing argument to the other character's madness or sanity.  Shakespeare creates a contrasting relationship between the breakdown of Ophelia and the "north-north-west" brand of insanity used by Hamlet

    • 1496 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Madness of Ophelia

    • 1914 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    like he is "mad north-northwest", but it is his lover, Ophelia, who is truly mad.  Both lose their fathers at the hands of others and both have loved ones that seem to have turned against them.  Unlike Hamlet, who has revenge, Ophelia ends up having nothing to hold onto.  Her sanity breaks and sends her into a downward spiral, while Hamlet's remains intact.  In this paper, I will show that it is the manipulation by and loss of the two men Ophelia loved most-Hamlet and her father, Polonius-which leads

    • 1914 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ophelia - The Innocent Victim in Shakespeare's Hamlet Poor Ophelia, she lost her lover, her father, her mind, and, posthumously, her brother. Ophelia is the only truly innocent victim in Hamlet. This essay will examine Ophelia's downward spiral from a chaste maiden to nervous wreck. From the beginning of the play, in Act I Scene iii, Laertes and Polonius are trying to convince her that Hamlet does not love her and only is interested in her so he can sleep with her. Laertes says "Perhaps he

    • 834 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Ophelia

    • 1496 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Ophelia A play with great value and quality would best describe one of Shakespeare’s intriguing plays, Hamlet. Events, dilemmas, action, and the characters all contribute greatly to make the play interesting and appealing. Every event that occurs leads to the outcome of dilemmas and action. The characters personalities is what makes the action is even more exciting. Each character has got their own special significance in the roles they play. However Ophelia, the daughter of the Lord Chamberlain

    • 1496 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Analysis of Ophelia from Hamlet Ophelia is gentle, loving and beautiful. She is also obedient to her father and loyal to her family and it is this which draws her into the circle of disaster and leads to her "untimely death". She is deeply in love with Hamlet and believes his "tenders" to be sincere, but her obedience to both her father and her brother must come first. Laertes tells her to beware of Hamlet's interest as it is driven by lust, not love. He also points out the difference in their

    • 5116 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    ophelia

    • 547 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Hurricane Ophelia was downgraded to a tropical storm again Monday as the indecisive weather system moved slowly off the coast, its outer bands of rain not quite reaching land. Despite Ophelia’s waxing and waning strength and slow progress, residents’ attention had been focused by the devastation caused elsewhere by Hurricane Katrina. That was on the mind of Steve King as he grudgingly skipped a football game on television to move his sea kayak out of harm’s way. “They keep saying this storm is

    • 547 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    to an ending in which almost every major character is dead. Two of these maddened characters are Hamlet and Ophelia, who also share a love for each other. But though their irrational behavior is often similar and their fates alike, one is truly mad while the other is not. Both Hamlet and Ophelia act very strangely. Hamlet, the prince of Denmark, insults everyone around him. He tells Ophelia he never loved her, calls her father a fishmonger, and in subtle ways calls his mother a whore and her new

    • 508 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hamlet -- Comparison of Gertrude and Ophelia Gertrude and Ophelia occupy the leading roles for females in the Shakespearean drama Hamlet. As women they share many things in common: attitudes from others, shallow or simple minds and outlooks, etc. This essay will delve into what they have in common. The protagonist’s negative attitude toward both women is an obvious starting point. John Dover Wilson explains in What Happens in Hamlet how the prince holds both of the women in disgust: The

    • 3020 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 14 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Tragedy of Ophelia in Hamlet

    • 946 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    The Tragedy of Ophelia in Hamlet Sweet and innocent, faithful and obedient, Ophelia is the truly tragic figure in William Shakespeare's Hamlet. "Her nature invites us to pity her misfortune caused not by any of her own self-initiated deeds or strategies"(Lidz 138). Laertes tells us convincingly how young and vulnerable Ophelia is, (act I. iii.10) likening her budding womanhood's destruction from Hamlet to a process as "the canker galls the infants of the spring,/ Too oft before their buttons

    • 946 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays