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    The Scarlet Letter:  The Transformation of Rev. Dimmesdale "Life is hard, but accepting that fact makes it easier." This common phrase clearly states a harsh fact that Rev. Dimmesdale, a character in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, had to face. In this story of deception and adultery set in the Puritan era, Hawthorne introduces Dimmesdale as a weak and cowardly man who refuses to take responsibility for his actions.  The Rev. Dimmesdale is a transitional character in that he is, at

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    The Scarlet Letter:  The Cowardly and Weak Dimmesdale In the book The Scarlet Letter, the character Reverend Dimmesdale, a very religious man, committed adultery, which was a sin in the Puritan community. Of course, this sin could not be committed alone. His partner was Hester Prynne. Hester was caught with the sinning only because she had a child named Pearl. Dimmesdale was broken down by Roger Chillinsworth, Hester Prynne’s real husband, and by his own self-guilt. Dimmesdale would later confess

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    The Scarlet Letter:  Dimmesdale – Purification Through Death Although Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter is primarily the story of an adulteress atoning for her sin and conquering the insignia which brings torment to her spirit, the quest of the partner in her sin, Arthur Dimmesdale, is no less important and even more painful.  His quest, simply phrased, is to glorify God through his priesthood and expiate his sin of adultery - to save his soul -  while protecting his reputation.  To do

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    The Effects of Sin Upon Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter Hawthorn shows sins of several different kinds in numerous people, as well as the consequences and remedies of their sins. Three main characters; Hester Prynne, Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale, and Roger Chillingworth bare the most of these sins. Arthur Dimmesdale, however, bares the most brutal effects of such sin. This is due to several reasons. The most observable reason for his eventual breakdown is the fact that he keeps his sin a secret

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    The Scarlet Letter: Dimmesdale the Wuss "But (Hester) is not the protagonist; the chief actor, and the tragedy of The Scarlet Letter is not her tragedy, but Dimmesdales. He it was whom the sorrows of death encompassed_. His public confession is one of the noblest climaxes of tragic literature." This statement by Randall Stewart does not contain the same ideas that I believe were contained within The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne. I, on the contrary to Stewart's statement, think Dimmesdale

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    Langston Hughes' "On the Road" In Langston Hughes, "On the Road" the Sargeant is a homeless Black man that is desperate for food and shelter. In his desperation, Sargeant goes to the church to refuge, but there is no one at the Church to help him get refuge. Although Sargent is living in a time where the depression is in existence amongst all people, Black and White, he finds no one to help him. Sargent goes to the Church because the Church helps people. However, because Sargeant is Black and

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    The Character of Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter In Hawthorne's classic, The Scarlet Letter, the pathetic, Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale is fully aware of the means by which he must liberate his soul from his grave sin. Yet, throughout the story his confession remains an impediment, constraining him, from then onwards, to a life of atonement. Reverend Dimmesdale attempts to divest himself of his guilt by revealing it to his parishioners during services, but somehow never manages to accomplish

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    The Character of Arthur Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter In The Scarlet Letter, Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale is considered a very honorable person by almost everyone in the Puritan town. Practically no one would believe that he would have the ability to do any evil, much less the sin of adultery. On the contrary, Dimmesdale feels that he is a terrible person for committing this sin and not admitting it to the townspeople. This fact affects him greatly yet unexpectedly increases his popularity

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    Dimmesdale and Hester’s Quest for Identity in The Scarlet Letter While allegory is an explicit and tempting reading of Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, I see in this novel also the potential of a psychological reading, interpreting it as a search for one’s own self. Both Arthur Dimmesdale and Hester Prynne goes through this process and finally succeeded in finding the duality of one's personality, and the impossibility of complementing the split between individual and community identity. However

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    Week 9 Paper

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    speech got canceled in the first place. The author of the article claims that “according to a group of alumni, the Rev. Kevin Johnson, senior pastor of Bright Hope Baptist Church in North Philadelphia, was disinvited from speaking at Morehouse College because he wrote a newspaper column critical of President Obama's administration” (McClatchy –Tribune Business News, 2013). I believe Rev. Kevin Johnson is being attacked for criticizing the Obama administration of not having enough African Americans

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    Dimmesdale's Double-talk in The Scarlet Letter Abstract: Critics of Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'The Scarlet Letter' are wrong to attribute to Hester the means of persuading Dimmesdale to elope with her and their child. It is Dimmesdale who uses his rhetorical mastery to talk Hester into talking him into eloping. An analysis of his conversation with Hester in the forest in comparison with his sermons shows that he is using the same discursive strategy he employs to convince his parishioners that

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    Ray Anderson

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    Rev. Dr. William J. Barber. The Rev. William Barber walks with a cane but he is making big strides for justice and equality through his organizing of “Moral Mondays” protests, which first started in North Carolina. The protests started as a response to the “mean-spirited quadruple attack” on the most vulnerable members of our society. In the tradition of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Rev. Barber is fighting restrictions on voting and for improvements

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    Comparing the Film and Novel Versions of Sam Hanna Bell’s December Bride If the movie based on Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride is considered to be good, it is only because the novel itself is nothing short of great. Having viewed the movie on two separate occasions, some four months apart, this writer found herself to still be somewhat bewildered by a few of the events portrayed. The novel clears the Irish fog swirling around those events creating a much more solidly constructed story

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    Revo Of 1905

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    At the turn of the twentieth century, Russia was a curious society, still stratified into nobility and peasantry. The Russian people seemed to be as immovable as the dark ground which they farmed, welded to the ground by centuries of struggle. While the Europeans fought political battles, the Russians wrestled against the cold and starvation. Four decades earlier, Czar Alexander II signed the ``Emancipation Manifesto'' which freed the serfs from ownership by the nobles.1 He had hoped to finally bring

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    Similarities in The Miller's Tale and The Reve's Tale "The Miller's Tale" and "The Reve's Tale" from The Canterbury Tales are very closely related. They both deal with the relationship between a jealous man, his wife, and a young scholar(s), and they both are immoral stories that contain sex and violence. This proves that the Miller and the Reeve are two very corrupt individuals. However, these tales also share some differences. For instance, the main character in "The Reeve's

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    Dunny Takes The Fifth

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    Dunny Takes The Fifth The roles which, being neither those of Hero nor Heroine, Confidante nor Villian, but which were none-theless essential to bring about the Recognition or the denoument...Fifth Business, as defined in the book. The book Fifth Business is testimony of events in the life of the main character Dunstable (later renamed Dunstan) Ramsay. Dunstan feels that his whole life has been spent as the "fifth business" in the lives of others. There is a lot of truth and relevence to this

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    The Reality of Beauty

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    “All shine, no substance” (110), describes Drummond’s rocking horse, the Golden Dancer- a symbol of the world and individuals who are blindfolded to the reality of the truth. Drummond is a defender for Cates, a law breaker during a Scopes trial (creation vs evolution). The rocking horse displays a glistening beauty on the outside; however, on the inside it is poorly manufactured, “The wood was rotten, the whole thing was put together with spit and sealing wax” (109). The Golden Dancer, a perfection

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    There is little that a person sympathizes with more, and gives a greater reaction to, then someone else’s suffering. Reverend Barton and Reverend Tryan are perfect representations of this idea. In “The Sad Fortunes of the Reverend Amos Barton,” Reverend Barton is newer to the town of Shepperton, and the townsfolk aren’t especially happy with his performance so far. The gossiping women gathered at Mrs Patten’s farm say things such as that he’s “Rather a low-bred fellow” and that “Our parson’s no gift

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    It is the complexity of the main characters and their interactions that make A Streetcar Named Desire such a successful and challenging play. The play A Streetcar Named Desire made playwright Tennessee William's name and has deservedly since had over half a century of success. This remarkable success can be credited to the intricate characters and their interactions with each other. Sisters, Stella and Blanche have had an enjoyable upbringing on the family plantation, "Belle Reve". As the name suggests

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    Humanity enjoys structure, from the streets with numeric organization, the times we wake up and go to sleep, to when we eat certain foods; if order is disturbed then people feel threatened and unsure of what to do. The twentieth century, with its chaotically quick changes, often made people uncertain about basic principles. To combat chaos, society had imposed a strict structure for people to follow. Society expected women to be in the kitchen, blacks to be servants to whites, the only love possible

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