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    Persistent Resistant Germs

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    Persistent Resistant Germs "At the dawn of a new millennium, humanity is faced with another crisis. Formerly curable diseases... are now arrayed in the increasingly impenetrable armour of antimicrobial resistance." Director General of World Health Organization1 The statement above was made in a report on infectious diseases in 2002. It seems these days that people everywhere are getting sick and are even dying due to infectious diseases; many of which used to be easily cured by antibiotics

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    Earthquake Loads & Earthquake Resistant Design of Buildings 1.     1 2.     Summary     2 3.     Earthquake Design - A Conceptual Review     2 4.     Earthquake Resisting Performance Expectations     3 5.     Key Material Parameters for Effective Earthquake Resistant Design     3 6.     Earthquake Design Level Ground Motion     4 6.1.     Elastic Response Spectra     4 6.2.     Relative Seismicity     5 6.3.     Soil amplification     6 7.     Derivation of Ductile Design Response Spectra     7

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    odds with bacteria, but we just can't kill them all.  If we try, we could see our plans backfire and send ourselves into a new and precarious future of disease.  To understand how, we simply need to take a look at how bacteria have become rapidly resistant to antibiotics, and we see a story unfolding that begins with penicillin as an attack on disease and now has become a Frankenstein's monster of sorts. Since the 1950s, antibiotics have been widely available and frequently prescribed, and consequently

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    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Part 1: Person, Place, Time Inside the U.S. Disease/Condition Topic Selection Research by Pantosti and Venditti (2009) supports that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or better known as MRSA, is an infectious disease that is spread through skin-to-skin contact (touching). It is highly spread within a hospital environment in which most patients that are susceptible to the “staph” germ have come to seek treatment for something else or for the infection

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    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

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    Shinkai, 2011). It can also cause post-operative infections at the wounds site, necrotizing pneumonia, and bacteraemia (Deurenberg et al., 2006). Resistance to methicillin is one of the major subtypes of this bacterium. It is then called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (Hansra & Shinkai, 2011). MRSA is usually considered to be a nosocomial infection (Witte, 2009), which means that it came from the hospital environment. The mecA gene determines methicillin resistance (Gordon & Lowy,

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    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

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    Often called a “superbug” due to its strong antibiotic resistance, Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most pathogenic of all staphylococci. It has been found to be responsible for a large number of infections that are difficult to treat and is a growing concern in the health care system. At any given time, approximately 20% to 30% of individuals in the community are colonized with staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and are persistent carriers, up to 50% are intermittent carriers

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    LITERATURE REVIEW MRSA (Meticillin-Resistant staphylococcus aureus) is a bacterial infection that infected different parts of the body, for example, the nares and throats, skin as well as wounds. It carried in the nares of 30% of healthy adults. In hospitalized patients, this infection can colonize different parts of the body, depending on the site infection, it can be mild such as having sores or boils on the skin or life threatening, like blood poisoning. It is also known as a superbug due to the

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    Stop Getting Sick at the Hospital: Preventing the Spread of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in U.S. Hospitals Information/Preliminary Issues Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to treatment by typical antibiotics. The most common kind is hospital-acquired (HAI), nosocomial, or healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA). People who undergo invasive medical procedures, who have compromised immune systems, or are being

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    Introduction of Paper Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a very serious infection that affects the health of the public. The purpose of this paper is to give the public/reader a better understanding of what MRSA really is. This paper will include the different disease characteristics that come with the infection. Also, it will explain the most recent disease statistics; identify a person’s risk of contracting the disease, methods used to control the spread of the disease, and explain

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    Staphylococcus aureus to MRSA Abstract I investigated the difference between Staphylococcus aureas and its super bacteria form of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureas. I used books, websites, and scholarly projects to understand the topic at a molecular level. After researching penicillin, Staphylococcus aureas, and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureas, I found that both the drug and the bacteria use enzymes as their defense and attack mechanism. Penicillin uses a ß-lactam

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