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    Significance of Repetition in Our Town Wilder was born in Madison, Wisconsin in 1897 to Amos Parker Wilder and Isabella Wilder.  In 1906, Amos Wilder was appointed American Consul General, and his family moved with him to Hong Kong.  Thornton Wilder only lived in Hong Kong for 6 months, moved back to the United States with his mother, and then in 1911 rejoined his father in Shanghai for a year.  Wilder attended Oberlin College for two years, moved with his family to New Haven, Connecticut, and

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    Use of Repetition, Word Choice, and Imagery in Neuromancer While reading "Neuromancer", one may become extremely baffled if he or she cannot interpret the terminology used or the framework in which the book is written. Hence, the use of the formalistic approach is necessary in order for the reader to actually understand the concepts trying to be declared by Gibson. Through the formalistic approach one can begin to see that Gibson uses repetition, and specific word choice to set the tone for the

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    Characterization, Symbolism, and Repetition in One Hundred Years of Solitude The names of characters often suggest something about their personalities, either straightforwardly or ironically. Garcia Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, Prudencio Aguilar is neither "prudent" nor "eagle-like" (aguila means "eagle" in Spanish).  Repetition of names and behaviors is another technique of characterization. Certain character types, e.g., the contemplative, stubborn man, or the impetuous, forceful

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    Repetition, Diction, and Simile in Cormac McCarthy’s The Crossing In Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Crossing, there is a dramatic sequence described by the narrator.  The author uses many different techniques to convey the impact of the experience on the narrator.  Some of these such techniques are: repetition, diction, and simile. Of the aforementioned techniques, the most obvious is repetition.  The author uses the word “and” a total of thirty-three times.  However, the simple usage of the

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    Metaphors and Repetition in Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night In Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night," the speaker is a son talking to his aging father and pleading with him to fight against death. The son knows that death is the inevitable end to every life, but feels one should not give up to death too easily. By using metaphor, imagery, and repetition, Thomas reinforces the son's message that aging men see their lives with sudden clarity and realize how they might have

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    some things are easy for me to learn, and some things are not. But there I go again, simplifying the matter. My learning experience throughout grade school was cast in the Traditional method, employing rote, reward-and-punishment, and repetition, repetition, repetition. It was a one-size-fits-all approach, intended to instill good behavior as much as to instruct in the rudiments of reading, writing and arithmetic. We were not encouraged to participate in the process, unless, of course, we raised our

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    cover

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    In the world of high level sports, superstitious rituals and habits are an integral part of every game. From the basketball player who bounces the ball a set number of times before taking each free throw to the baseball player kissing his religious necklace before getting into batting position. These actions have no direct bearing on the game itself; however, they are meticulously performed nonetheless. Although a lay person might view these rituals as a simple waste of time, to the athletes, they

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    works, was met by scornful criticism and unyielding admiration. However, many literary critics also marveled at Salinger's use of language, which was used to make Holden Caulfield, the main character, extremely realistic. Such language includes both repetition of phrases and blatant cursing, in order to capture the informal speech of the average, northeastern American adolescent. Through Holden's thoughts and dialogues, Salinger successfully created a teenage boy. The language used in The Catcher in

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    should still make a stand at the end. Different men approach death in different ways, but no matter what their approach, they should fight against loss itself. Stanza analysis Stanza 1 Line 1 is a repetition of the title of the poem - a line which is repeated four times in the poem. The repetition is functional as it emphasises the theme of the poem: not to accept death without fighting it as long as possible. In stanza 1 three different phrases are used to denote the idea of death namely good

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    Teletubbies

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    "Teletubbies" makes use of bright colors, music, repetition, and a slow pace, because this is how young children learn, according to the current research on education. Michael Brunton, in an article in Time, said that "people are missing the point" when they criticize the repetition and hear the baby-talk of the teletubbies. "Teletubbies is in fact closely modeled around the latest theories of speech that identify patterns of movement, a sing-song voice,...repetition and social interaction as key building

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