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    Religious Tradition view of Euthanasia State One Religious Traditions View Of Euthanasia Euthanasia is described by the Oxford English Dictionary as ‘The bringing about of a gentle and easy death, especially in the case of incurable and painful diseases’ . The Christian view of Euthanasia is that it is wrong. They understand, the pain and emotional suffering, caused in the case of terminally ill, but believe that a hospice is a better solution and that to commit Euthanasia is murder and

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    Hindu Religious Traditions

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    Hindu Religious Traditions Most people in the world derive their religious beliefs and traditions from their parents and peer influences. From a religious point of view, “There are many definitions for the term ‘religion’ in common usage. [Broadly defined], in order to include the greatest number of belief systems: ‘Religion is any specific system of belief about deity, often involving rituals, a code of ethics, and a philosophy of life’” (Robinson, 1996). However, in examining Hinduism, it is

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    Renunciation in Indian Religious Traditions World renunciation is a major theme in Indian civilization, seen by the fact that all major Indic Religions deal with it in one way or another. The ancient Vedic texts laid out a cosmic and social hierarchy – a conception of ‘the world’ – and taught people how to act in accordance with their varna in a way that kept the world in harmony and kept the gods appeased. In the 6th century BCE, world renunciation emerged as a component of religious teachings that

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    just war

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    One of the oldest traditions in religious ethics is that of the just war. The "Just War Theory" specifies under which conditions war is just. Opposition based on the Just War Theory differs from that of pacifists. Oppositionists oppose particular wars but not all war. Their opposition is based on principals of justice rather than principles of pacifism (Becker 926). In the monotheistic religious traditions of Christianity and Islam, one role of God (or Allah) is to limit or control aggressions among

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    Chinese Religious Traditions

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    a single organization, and an emphasis of belief over practice. However, Chinese religious traditions challenge this conception of religion. It is shown in this paper that the Chinese traditional religion challenges the existence of a supreme being as the center of religion. It also contests the concept of religion as a membership in a single religious organization that emphasizes religious beliefs more than religious practices. This paper reviews the existence of religion in China prior to their

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    In all religions, there are some basic traditions. Religion traditions are intertwined with culture, economics, politics, and modern social relationships on every dimension. Whether you attend a cathedral, a synagogue, or a mosque, habitually, intermittently, or abstain entirely, you simply cannot escape religion. The traditions and rituals only strengthen the bonds in many religious communities. The term religious community is used in a wider sense and a distinctive narrower sense. In the wider

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    Religious Traditions of Weddings

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    revolve around the traditions of a certain religion, and each religion has its own way of conducting such a ceremony. Each one can be very different or can be similar. In the cases of Buddhism and Muslim traditions, weddings are differing when it comes to the actual ceremony. Buddhist weddings on not entirely focused on religious traditions. Although it is based on the couples’ preferences, most Buddhist wedding ceremonies are based more on faith and beliefs rather than any religious foundations. The

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    Background of the Catholic Church

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    reverberated traditions of the Catholic Church as well as the evolving Protestant sects. In consequence of increases in technology and science, modern society has redefined its acceptable and moral behavioral standards within a social setting, whereas, the Catholic Church stands firm in its doctrines despite social and moral movements in the twentieth century. Except for the Second Vatican Council and the Council of Trent, the Roman Catholic Church has not worked to revise its religious traditions in response

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    standard forms of invocation, sacraments or rites of initiation); and a moral code. Religious Traditions In Canada the principal religion is Christianity; as recently as the 1971 census, almost 90 per cent of the population claimed adherence.

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    have migrated to the United States. Some form subcultures or communities while others are dispersed and isolated. Over time, many of the ceremonies and traditions, such as funerals, associated with a particular culture have been influenced by or mingled with Euro-American customs, causing people to loose touch with the context of their own traditions. For example, some conform to American burial customs and adopt secular attitudes about bereavement, which tend to underestimate the power of grief and

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