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    The Religious Right and The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is set in the near future in the Republic of Gilead, formerly the United States. A religious extremist right-wing movement assassinated the president and congress and took complete control of the government. The constitution was suspended and liberties revoked. Women found themselves completely subordinated in the new regime, generally assigned to the legal care of a male "guardian." Offred, the main character of

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    The Religious Right and the Crusade to Preserve Religion This paper was written for my Writing 209 class. For the assignment ,Donna Marsh, asked us to find an article in a periodical that dealt with an issue in our American culture. We were then told to express our opinion on the topic discussed in the article and to analyze the argument presented in the article. I chose the topic of school prayer because I believe strongly in the separation of church and state that exists in our country. This

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    Religious Musings on The Turner Diaries: Reading the Bible of the Racist Right Domestic religious terrorism doesn't figure very strongly in the modern American consciousness. However, this may be more of an embarrassing oversight than an encouraging reflection of reality. Juergensmeyer did me quite a service by starting out his forceful documentation and analysis by looking at the actions of the American religious right. Though he focused on those responsible for the attacks against abortion clinics

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    Rhetoric of the Religious Right One hundred and fifty-six years ago, in 1848, when the first Women’s Rights Convention was held in the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, the concept that women were entitled to fully enfranchised citizenship was a completely foreign concept. Ideas expressed and rights demanded at that convention, and at early feminist conventions organized throughout the next seventy years, were considered ridiculous. Suffrage rights, divorce rights, women’s property rights, and married

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    By exploring the Religious Right, its foundation, purposes, and influences can be gleaned. Although it is currently commonly referenced, the Religious Right as a concept can be traced back to the earliest decades of the 20th century. Once the introduction of evolutionism teaching in schools and freedom of sexual information became ostensibly common, the earliest forces that would turn to be the Religious Right emerged. Conservative Christian values and general morality were no longer considered to

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    How does one define religious freedom and prisoner rights? Religious freedom is defined in the First Amendment “to practice his or her own religious, or no religion at all”. Religious Freedom was established to help individuals express and/or practice their own beliefs without anyone having to say what they can’t believe in or practice. Prisoner rights under the eighth amendment, paraphrase Prisoners do not have full Constitutional rights as anyone else but they do have protection Constitution’s

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    The Religious Right

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    The Religious Right "We want to be, and will be free, to practice as we believe". This sentiment resonated throughout the colonies approximately two and one half centuries ago. The colonists suffered religious restrictions placed upon them by their ruling monarchy. The struggle to become independent had started. A war for independence ensued, then eventual victory and then the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights includes amendments 1-10 (initially) and the first amendment states, "Congress shall

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    Lucretia Coffin was born on January 3, 1793 in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Lucretia was a women’s rights activist and was opposed to slavery. Lucretia grew up to be a women’s rights activist, religious reformer, and abolitionist. She was strongly opposed to slavery and was devoted to her work as an abolitionist. As she became older, word spread that she could speak in such a way that could convince her audience to join her anti-slavery boycott; however, there were people that were against the idea

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    The Religious Right Movement

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    The book, Jerry Falwell and the Rise of the Religious Right by Matthew Avery Sutton portrays the historical background behind Jerry Falwell and traditional Christian beliefs. Some of the issues and events that drove Falwell and other conservative Christians to new forms of political activism in the second half of the twentieth century are: sex education, abortion and homosexuality. In 1961, Evangelist and pastor Tim LaHaye worked on informing and ridding public schools of sex education programs.

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    Arguably, citizens of the United States of American are endowed with “certain unalienable rights.” Our forefathers fought to establish a government that would enable its citizens to protect these rights should they be challenged. Recently the rights of two different groups have been called into question surrounding the Contraception Mandate, which is part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), signed into law by President Obama on March 23rd 2010. The mandate states that employers

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