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    American Religious Movements

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    American Religious Movements: Fundamentalism and Its’ Influence on Evangelicalism American fundamentalism and American evangelicalism seem to go hand in hand. Evangelicalism and fundamentalism both stress life based on the bible, repentance, and a personal relationship with God. No one would deny the massive influence that fundamentalism had on evangelicalism or the similarities between the two. Although some historians would suggest that evangelicalism was experiential and sectarian while fundamentalism

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    New Religious Movements

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    Dawson (2010) Lorne Dawson presents a unique perspective on the similarities between New Religious Movements (NRM), which are also known as cults, and radical Islamic groups. Dawson (2010) questions why no dialogue has occurred because of the similarities between the two types of movements. Dawson (2010) stated that individuals that join Islamic extremist groups have the same issues of NRM members who experience a source of deprivation or alienation from the secular world. As with both groups, Dawson

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    Modern New Religious Movements (NRMs) have been around since the turn of the nineteenth century. Today there are some serious NRMs out there and then some that may just be the fad of the moment . . . like the hemline with not much of a personal commitment. Britannica defines NRMs as “the generally accepted term for what is sometimes called, often with pejorative connotations, a “cult.” The term new religious movement has been applied to all new faiths that have arisen worldwide over the past several

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    New Religious Movements and the Biased Media

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    New Religious Movements and the Biased Media What happened in Jonestown? How could “sensible people” follow the “rantings of a crazed lunatic?” The questions and the simplified answers that are provided by the media coverage of Jonestown and Heaven’s Gate perhaps contributed to their downfall. The feeling of public persecution is a central theme of many new religious movements, and the negative publicity of suicide cults only fuels the fear of other like-minded religious groups. The misleading

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    The power of the media is paramount. More so than chief political leaders, major religious leaders or organisations. It is a bold statement to make, but one that is hard to argue against, especially in a day and age where everything is instant. This essay critically examines the role the media plays in the public’s perception of New Religious Movements. It shall examine how the media portrays New Religious Movements, the techniques used in this portrayal, examples of events that the media have covered

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    Introduction The 1970’s brought with it an unexpected rise of new religions movements and most of these had links with Eastern origins. These religions operated on the fringes of the traditional religious institutions were immediately controversial. This controversiality combined with the interest shown in them by especially the educated youth, as well their subsequent conversion to these new alternate religious movements, raised serious concerns with the stalwarts of the traditional value systems

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    John Saliba’s approach to new religious movements is secular (despite his position as a Jesuit Priest) and well rounded. He begins by exploring how new religious movements are viewed today, how they have been reacted to in the past and why that may be. He examines the original definition of the word “cult” as well as the modern derivations of it and how it affects these new religious movements. By considering multiple opinions on new religious movements as well as looking at the historical, psychological

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    View that Deprivation is the Main Reason for the New Religious Movements Membership of established mainstream churches has dropped dramatically. However affiliation with other religious organisations (including penticostal, Seventh-Day Adventists and Christian sects) has risen just as noticeably. It is estimated that there may now be as many as 25,000 new religious groups n Europe alone. In attempting to classify new religious movements, Wallis identified three main kinds of NRM. World rejecting

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    to follow, two opposing mass movements manifested: the LGBT movement and the Religious Right movement. The LGBT movement aimed to get equal rights for homosexuals. The Religious Right focused on stopping the perceived moral decay of America and protecting children from lesbians and gays. While these movements had polar opposite goals, they used surprisingly similar methods to get their messages across. Politicians Both the LGBT movement and the Religious Right movement attempted to make their mark

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    This work investigates the implications of theories of global change for the study of religion generally and, through a series of case studies, applications of those theories to specific religious movements. In particular, Beyer is interested in the seeming contradiction of the persistence of conflict between social units within a globalizing world that is more and more becoming a "single place." The first half of his book, the introduction and four chapters, is taken up with theoretical definitions

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